Publications by authors named "Deepak Kumar Bhasin"

100 Publications

Frequency & predictors of pancreatitis in symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism.

Indian J Med Res 2018 Dec;148(6):721-727

Department of Endocrinology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India.

Background & Objectives: The frequency and predictors of pancreatitis in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are not well understood. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of pancreatitis in patients with PHPT and its association with clinical and biochemical parameters of the disease.

Methods: In this retrospective study all consecutive patients with PHPT registered in the PHPT registry (www.indianphptregistry.com) from the year 2004 to 2013 were included. The clinical, biochemical and radiological parameters related to pancreatitis were evaluated in histologically proven PHPT patients.

Results: A total of 218 patients (63 men; mean age: 40.6±14.4 yr) underwent surgery for PHPT during the study. Pancreatitis occurred in 35 [16%, 18 acute and 17 chronic pancreatitis (CP)] patients and male:female ratio was 1:0.94. Skeletal manifestations were seen less frequently in PHPT with pancreatitis as compared to that of PHPT without pancreatitis. PHPT with pancreatitis had significantly higher serum calcium (12.4±2.0 vs. 11.7±1.5 mg/dl, P <0.05) in comparison to PHPT without pancreatitis. PHPT with acute pancreatitis (AP) had higher serum calcium (P <0.05) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) (P <0.05) levels than PHPT with CP. Curative parathyroidectomy improved the symptoms associated with pancreatitis as there was no recurrence in AP group, whereas recurrence was observed only in about 10 per cent patients of the CP group.

Interpretation & Conclusions: Pancreatitis was observed in 16 per cent of PHPT patients with male predominance in the study population. No recurrence of AP was observed after curative surgery. It may be proposed that serum amylase with calcium and PTH should be measured in all patients of PHPT with pain abdomen to rule out pancreatitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_353_16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6396558PMC
December 2018

Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography performs better than contrast-enhanced computed tomography for metastasis evaluation in the initial staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

Ann Nucl Med 2017 Oct 8;31(8):575-581. Epub 2017 Jul 8.

Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 160012, India.

Objective: To evaluate the additional role of FDG-PET/CT to the conventional multiphasic CECT in the initial staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

Methods: 54 patients diagnosed with pathologically proven pancreatic malignancy underwent FDG-PET/CECT. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of PET/CT and CECT for nodal and metastatic staging were calculated. The statistical difference was calculated by McNemar's test.

Results: Of 54 patients, 15 had distal metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of PET/CT and CECT for nodal staging were 33 vs 89%, 84 vs 100%, 67 vs 100%, 60 vs 90%, and 59 vs 95%, respectively, p < 0.001. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of CECT for metastatic staging were 73, 87, 69, 89, and 83%, whereas the accuracy of PET/CT was 100%, p = 0.01. By correctly characterizing unsuspected distant lesions, PET/CT could change management in 19% of patients.

Conclusion: FDG-PET/CT can contribute to change in the management in almost one of every five patients of PA evaluated with the standard investigations during the initial staging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12149-017-1193-0DOI Listing
October 2017

An unusual neck swelling: Extension of mediastinal pseudocyst into the neck.

Endosc Ultrasound 2017 Jan-Feb;6(1):71-72

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2303-9027.200210DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5331849PMC
February 2017

Capsule endoscopy in small bowel Crohn's disease and Tuberculosis.

Trop Doct 2017 Apr 6;47(2):113-118. Epub 2017 Jan 6.

1 Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.

Differentiation of small bowel tuberculosis (SBTB) from Crohn's disease (CD) is a diagnostic challenge. We studied 52 patients with suspected SBTB or CD with terminal ileal involvement, who were prospectively enrolled. After confirming patency of the gastrointestinal tract, 26 patients underwent capsule endoscopy (CE). A final diagnosis of CD was found in 18 patients and SBTB in eight patients. All SBTB patients had involvment of the ileocecal valve (ICV) with large (n = 6) and aphthous (n = 2) ulcers in the ileal segment. In CD, ICV involvement was seen in five (33%) patients. Large and aphthous ulcers were observed in seven (47%) and 15 (100%) patients, respectively. On comparison with CD, patients with SBTB had increased frequency of ICV involvement ( P = 0.002) and lesser frequency of aphthous ulcers ( P = 0.007). CE can help in differentiating CD from SBTB by the position of its involvement and the type of ulcers present.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0049475516686542DOI Listing
April 2017

Timing of surgical intervention in patients of infected necrotizing pancreatitis not responding to percutaneous catheter drainage.

Pancreatology 2016 Sep-Oct;16(5):778-87. Epub 2016 Aug 13.

Department of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Background: The timing of surgery in patients not responding to percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in infected pancreatic necrosis remains challenging.

Materials And Methods: A randomized controlled trial was designed to establish the optimal timings of surgery following PCD in patients with infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN). Patients who did not improve by day 10 after PCD insertion were included in the present study and were randomized to group A (step-up approach as a bridge to surgery) or group B (step-up approach with intention to avoid surgery). Weekly inflammatory and nutritional markers were monitored in both groups (clinical trials. gov identifier NCT-01527084).

Results: From July 2011 to December 2012, 40 patients underwent treatment with PCD. The first 8 patients were randomized into two groups. The trial was stopped prematurely because of difficulty in accrual and poor progress. All subsequent patients were managed with step-up approach with the intention to avoid surgery. Of 35 patients, 24 patients were managed by PCD alone while 11 patients required surgery. In patients who did not require surgery; levels of serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6(IL6) and prealbumin showed a falling trend. This group also had higher baseline albumin and higher albumin at 4 weeks.

Conclusion: During the present study, randomization into surgery at a predetermined time in step-up approach was discontinued due to poor progress. Step-up approach with the intention to avoid surgery led to a success rate of 68.5%. The present study failed to predict the optimal timing of surgery after PCD. Patients who needed surgery were sicker at the time of admission, had higher incidence of organ failure, and spent more time in the ICU compared to patients who did not need surgery. In future, inflammatory and nutritional markers may be useful to identify patients who are unlikely to respond to PCD and may help determine the timing of surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pan.2016.08.006DOI Listing
March 2017

Opium-related sphincter of Oddi dysfunction causing double duct sign.

Endosc Ultrasound 2016 Jul-Aug;5(4):269-71

Department of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Double duct sign where there is a simultaneous dilatation of both the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct is usually associated with sinister causes like malignancies of pancreatic head or ampulla. Occasionally, benign causes like chronic pancreatitis or sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) may cause double duct sign. Chronic opium abuse is a rare cause of the double duct sign, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings of this rare entity have been occasionally reported. We report about a 54-year-old male with a history of chronic alcohol and opioid abuse evaluated for episodes of abdominal pain and found to have opioid-related SOD and improved with biliary sphincterotomy. EUS was done to rule out malignancy and revealed hypoechoic prominence around terminal CBD suggestive of hypertrophied muscle.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2303-9027.187892DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4989410PMC
August 2016

Endoscopic management of splenic pseudocysts associated with acute and chronic pancreatitis.

Ann Gastroenterol 2016 Jul-Sep;29(3):373-7. Epub 2016 Apr 25.

Department of Gastroenterology (Surinder Singh Rana, Ravi Sharma, Puneet Chhabra, Vishal Sharma, Deepak Kumar Bhasin), India; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fortis Hospital, Mohali, Punjab (Puneet Chhabra, Deepak Kumar Bhasin), India.

Background: Splenic pseudocysts (SP) are a rare consequence of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Surgery has been conventional treatment for SP and literature on role of endoscopic treatment is scant. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated SP clinical and radiological characteristics as well as the outcome following endoscopic drainage.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of SP patients seen at our unit from January 2002 to June 2015. All patients were treated with attempted endoscopic transpapillary drainage with a nasopancreatic drain or stent. Patients not responding underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural or percutaneous radiological drainage.

Results: Eleven patients with SP (all male; mean age: 40.5±8.8 years) were studied. Seven patients had chronic pancreatitis and 4 patients had SP following acute pancreatitis. The majority (10/11; 91%) had alcohol-related acute or chronic pancreatitis with one patient having coexistent pancreas divisum. Seven (64%) patients were treated successfully with transpapillary drainage only; one (9%) patient needed combined transpapillary and transmural drainage; and 3 (27%) patients needed surgery.

Conclusion: Endoscopic transpapillary drainage is an effective treatment for SP especially when it is not infected and with clear contents, and is associated with partial ductal disruption that can be bridged by an endoprosthesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.20524/aog.2016.0038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4923826PMC
July 2016

Prevention of recurrence of fluid collections in walled off pancreatic necrosis and disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome: Comparative study of one versus two long term transmural stents.

Pancreatology 2016 Jul-Aug;16(4):687-8. Epub 2016 May 24.

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Sector 12, Chandigarh, 160012, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pan.2016.05.009DOI Listing
March 2017

Gastrointestinal bleeding in the tropics: Look for the hookworm.

Trop Doct 2017 Jan 12;47(1):48-51. Epub 2016 Apr 12.

Director, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fortis Hospital, Mohali.

Hookworms are recognised as a cause of iron-deficiency anaemia in endemic areas. They are, however, often not considered in the differential diagnosis of overt gastrointestinal bleeding. We report the endoscopic diagnosis of hookworms as the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in three patients, two of whom had frank haemorrhage with one presenting in hypovolemic shock. Hookworm infestation is an important treatable cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in tropical countries.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0049475516640192DOI Listing
January 2017

Noninvasive evaluation of active pan-ulcerative colitis with multiple strictures using Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

Indian J Nucl Med 2016 Jan-Mar;31(1):65-6

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease characterized by waxing and waning inflammation that changes in severity and extent and may progress to neoplasia, especially in the presence of strictures. When patients have nonnegotiable strictures or severe inflammation with ulcers, colonoscopy is difficult and carries the risk of perforation. The authors present a patient with pan-UC with multiple strictures, in whom fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography was used to noninvasively evaluate the extent and severity of the disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-3919.172367DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4746848PMC
February 2016

Primary esophageal tuberculosis mimicking esophageal cancer with vascular involvement.

Endosc Ultrasound 2016 Jan-Feb;5(1):61-2

Department of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector 12, Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2303-9027.175924DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4770626PMC
February 2016

An Unusual Cause of Umbilical Nodule.

Am J Gastroenterol 2016 Jan;111(1):24

Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2015.224DOI Listing
January 2016

Gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm resulting from a plastic stent after pseudocyst drainage.

Endoscopy 2015 29;47 Suppl 1:E631-2. Epub 2015 Dec 29.

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1393589DOI Listing
September 2016

Creation of multiple transluminal gateway during endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic necrosis by enlarging tract of impending rupture in duodenum.

Endosc Ultrasound 2015 Jul-Sep;4(3):257-9

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector 12, Chandigarh, India.

Necrotic pancreatic collections are difficult to treat endoscopically due to a concern for inadequate drainage of the necrotic debris. Multiple techniques including the use of metallic stents, endoscopic necrosectomy and use of hybrid approaches utilizing endoscopic and percutaneous approaches have been described for the management of pancreatic necrotic collections. Furthermore, multiple transluminal gateway technique has been used to create endosonography guided multiple tracts to drain a perigastric or periduodenal collection. We hereby report about a patient with walled off necrosis resulting as a complication of alcohol related acute pancreatitis that was drained using endoscopic ultrasound-guided approach. However, a spontaneous cystoduodenal fistula was used to create another tract and place transmural stents resulting in a quick resolution of symptoms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2303-9027.163019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4568641PMC
September 2015

Factors determining recurrence of fluid collections following migration of intended long term transmural stents in patients with walled off pancreatic necrosis and disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome.

Endosc Ultrasound 2015 Jul-Sep;4(3):208-12

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Background And Objectives: Long-term indwelling transmural stents in patients with walled off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) and disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome (DPDS) decreases risk of recurrence of pancreatic fluid collection (PFC). However, stents can spontaneously migrate causing recurrence of PFC in some patients whereas some patients may have asymptomatic migration of stents. We aim to retrospectively evaluate profile of patients with recurrent PFC following migration of transmural stents in patients with WOPN and DPDS and compare it with patients who had asymptomatic migration of stents.

Patients And Methods: Records of consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic transmural drainage of WOPN over last 4 years were analyzed and patients with DPDS identified.

Results: Thirty-five patients (29 M; mean age 37.0 ± 7.6 years) were followed-up for mean of 28.2 ± 14.0 months (range: 6-50 months). Eight patients (22.8%) had spontaneous migration of stents. It led to recurrence of PFC in three patients, whereas in five patients it was asymptomatic. The patients with recurrent PFC had early stent migration (2, 4, and 5 months respectively) whereas patients with asymptomatic migration had their stents migrating >6 months of resolution. Patients with recurrent PFC had duct disruption in pancreatic head (100% vs. 20%), and low frequency of diabetes (nil vs. 40%), steatorrhea (nil vs. 20%) as well as pancreatic atrophy (nil vs. 80%).

Conclusion: Early migration of stents, ductal disruption in pancreatic head as well as absence of diabetes, steatorrhea, and pancreatic atrophy seem to increase risk of recurrent PFC following migration of transmural stents in patients with DPDS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2303-9027.162999DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4568632PMC
September 2015

Prospective comparison of long term outcomes in patients with severe acute pancreatitis managed by operative and non operative measures.

Pancreatology 2015 Sep-Oct;15(5):478-484. Epub 2015 Aug 29.

Department of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Aim: Present study reports the long term functional and morphological changes following severe acute pancreatitis and compares patients managed by operative and non-operative methods. Association between morphological changes and functional parameters were studied.

Materials And Methods: 35 patients with one year of follow up after recovery from attack of acute pancreatitis were evaluated.

Results: Etiology was alcohol in 19, gallstones in 11 and idiopathic in 5. Fourteen patients were managed non-operatively and 21 operatively. Patients in non-operative group had a mean follow-up of 18.4 ± 8.2 months while patients in necrosectomy group had 31.4 ± 20.6 months. 40% patients had exocrine insufficiency (abnormal fecal fat) while 48.5% patients (17/35) had new onset diabetes. 90% patients had morphological changes in pancreas. Exocrine abnormality was significantly higher in necrosectomy group compared to non-operative group (57.2% vs 14.1%, p = 0.01). Patients undergoing necrosectomy had higher incidence of endocrine dysfunction {61.9% in surgery and 28.5% in non-operative group (p = 0.053)}. Operative group had more number of patients with completely non-visualized main pancreatic duct (MPD) (p = 0.028) and non-operative group had significantly higher irregular MPD (p = 0.021). Exocrine dysfunction was more in patients with complete non-visualization of MPD and/or incompletely visualized MPD (p = 0.013).

Conclusion: Patients managed non-operatively had significantly less exocrine and endocrine dysfunction compared to operated patients. Exocrine dysfunction was significantly associated with complete non-visualization of MPD and/or incompletely visualized MPD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pan.2015.08.006DOI Listing
July 2016

Medical management of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

Trop Gastroenterol 2014 Oct-Dec;35(4):205-11

Chronic pancreatitis is a common disorder caused by various etiological factors. It usually manifests with abdominal pain and exocrine (steatorrhea, malnutrition) or endocrine insufficiency (diabetes mellitus). Abdominal pain is the dominant symptom in these patients. Medical, endoscopic and surgical modalities are available for therapy. This review focuses on the pharmacological approaches to manage pancreatic pain. Before embarking on medical management of pain it is prudent to exclude complications like pancreatic cancer, pseudocysts, inflammatory mass, biliary or duodenal obstruction which may contribute to abdominal pain. Pharmacological measures for pain relief include central analgesics, enzyme supplements and antioxidants. Other measures include endoscopic and surgical therapy which are not discussed here. Appropriate management of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and successful control of diabetes are also important in the management of chronic pancreatitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7869/tg.218DOI Listing
October 2015

Nonfluoroscopic endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of pseudocysts: A pictorial technical review.

Endosc Ultrasound 2015 Apr-Jun;4(2):92-7

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Pancreatic pseudocysts (PP) are one of the important local complications of pancreatitis and can be treated by surgical, laparoscopic, percutaneous, or endoscopic methods. The endoscopic methods of drainage include transpapillary or transmural drainage or a combination of these two routes. The transmural drainage can be done using conventional duodenoscope without endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance or under EUS guidance. The EUS-guided transmural drainage of PP is done under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance. We have earlier reported nonfluoroscopic EUS-guided transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis. In this pictorial technical review, we will discuss in detail this method of nonfluoroscopic EUS-guided drainage of PP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2303-9027.156719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4445182PMC
May 2015

Combined endovascular and endoscopic management of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm, mediastinal pseudocyst, and pancreatic pleural effusion due to chronic pancreatitis.

Gastrointest Endosc 2015 ;81(6):1501-2

Department of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2015.01.038DOI Listing
February 2016

Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of calcified pseudocyst in a patient with chronic calcific pancreatitis.

Ann Gastroenterol 2015 Apr-Jun;28(2):290

Department of Gastroenterology (Surinder Singh Rana, Vishal Sharma, Ravi Sharma, Deepak Kumar Bhasin), Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4367225PMC
September 2014

Successful hemostasis of arterial bleeding in chronic pseudocyst by direct endoscopic injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in the pseudoaneurysm.

Gastrointest Endosc 2015 Apr;81(4):1046-7

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2014.09.057DOI Listing
April 2015

Inguinoscrotal region as an unusual site of extra-pancreatic collections in infected pancreatic necrosis.

Gastroenterol Rep (Oxf) 2016 Aug 2;4(3):246-50. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

Surgical Gastroenterology Division, Department of General Surgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Severe acute pancreatitis often leads to pancreatic and peripancreatic collections but, rarely, it can lead to collections at sites remote from the pancreas. Three male patients presented with abdominal pain and inguinoscrotal swelling. They were initially misdiagnosed with obstructed inguinal hernia, epididymo-orchitis and hydrocele, respectively. Later, their diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was revealed on laparotomy in one patient and on computed tomography (CT) in the remaining two patients. All these cases had extensive peripancreatic necrosis and paracolic collections tracking along the psoas muscle, downwards towards the pelvis. These collections were initially managed by percutaneous drainage and saline irrigation as a part of the 'step-up' approach. Two of these patients required open necrosectomy, while all required incision and drainage of inguinoscrotal collections. All the patients were discharged in satisfactory condition. Inguinoscrotal swelling is unusual as a first presentation of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion, with careful study of patient's history and examination along with CT, may provide an accurate diagnosis. Local drainage may be required to control sepsis and also provide an egress route for intra-abdominal collections.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gastro/gou090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4976673PMC
August 2016

Retroperitoneal fibrosis with a complex cystic lesion mimicking an inferior vena cava tumor.

Endoscopy 2015 20;47 Suppl 1 UCTN:E26-7. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1390716DOI Listing
September 2015

Pancreatic tuberculosis: Evaluation of therapeutic response using F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

Indian J Nucl Med 2014 Oct;29(4):257-9

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is a functional imaging technique that monitors glucose metabolism in tissues. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has been reported to show intense uptake of FDG, with a decrease in metabolism of the tuberculous lesions after successful anti-tubercular treatment (ATT). The authors present a patient with pancreatic TB and demonstrate the usefulness of FDG PET/CT in monitoring the response to ATT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-3919.142635DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4228592PMC
October 2014

Pancreatic tuberculosis: look at the kidney!

Dig Liver Dis 2015 Jan 22;47(1):e1. Epub 2014 Sep 22.

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Sector 12, Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2014.08.043DOI Listing
January 2015

An unusual cause of gastric submucosal bulge on endoscopy.

Endosc Ultrasound 2014 Jul;3(3):198-9

Department of Gastroenterology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2303-9027.138798DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4145482PMC
July 2014
-->