Publications by authors named "Deepak Dabkara"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Outcomes of metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder.

Ecancermedicalscience 2021 14;15:1174. Epub 2021 Jan 14.

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, India.

Background: Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder (NECGB) is a rare pathological entity. They are found to be aggressive cancers. Treatment strategies are based largely on extrapolation from other small cell cancers. Survival is poor compared to adenocarcinoma. Data from low- and middle-income countries are sparse.

Methods: All patients with metastatic NECGB treated in our centre were identified. Their treatment details were captured from electronic medical records. Baseline characteristics were noted and survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meir method.

Results: A total of 15 patients were included. The median age was 55 years. Large cell comprises 2/15 and small cell was found in 13/15 patients. Chemotherapy was platinum-based in 12 patients. The response to first-line chemotherapy was partial in 3 (20%), stable disease in 2 (13.3%) and progressive disease in 10 (66.6%). After a median duration of follow-up of 12 months, the median progression free survival was 3 months and the median overall survival was 5 months.

Conclusion: The outcomes of small cell gallbladder cancer are dismal, despite good response rate. More prospective data are required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3332/ecancer.2021.1174DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7929769PMC
January 2021

Multimodality treatment outcome in patients with primary malignant mediastinal germ cell tumor in adults.

Cancer Rep (Hoboken) 2021 Feb 8;4(1):e1306. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Department of Radiodiagnosis, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, India.

Background: Malignant mediastinal germ cell tumor (MGCT) is rare and has poor outcomes even after multimodality treatment. Data from resource-poor countries are scarce in the literature.

Aims: To evaluate the clinicopathologic features and treatment outcome of primary malignant MGCT at our center.

Methods And Results: Single institutional data review of patients aged ≥18 years, treated with a diagnosis of malignant MGCT between Nov'2013 and Nov'2019. Risk stratification was done as per International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) classification. Patients were treated with platinum based chemotherapy and surgical resection for the residual disease was performed in non-seminomatous histology.28 patients had MGCT with a median age of 25 years (range:18-36) and all were male. Seven patients had superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO) at diagnosis and pre-treatment histological diagnosis was available in 23 (82%) patients. Seven (25%) patients had seminoma histology, all were of good risk as per IGCCCG risk criteria, whereas others had non-seminoma histology with poor-risk group. Seven patients with seminoma histology achieved a complete response after initial treatment. Six patients with non-seminoma histology underwent complete resection of residual disease post-chemotherapy and five revealed residual viable tumors. After a median follow-up of 10.8 months (range:2.9-75), 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) estimate was 61.2% and 94.7% in the whole cohort, respectively and 3-year PFS and OS estimate was 100% in patients with seminoma histology.

Conclusions: This is the largest data set of MGCT patients' outcomes reported from India with multi-modality treatment. All patients were male and one-fourth had SVCO at presentation. Seminoma histology patients had a 100% outcome after initial platinum based chemotherapy. But, those with non-seminoma histology had a poor outcome even with chemotherapy and surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cnr2.1306DOI Listing
February 2021

Perspective of Oncology Patients During COVID-19 Pandemic: A Prospective Observational Study From India.

JCO Glob Oncol 2020 06;6:844-851

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Purpose: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed a unique challenge to oncology patients and their treatment. There is no study related to the patients' preference for systemic therapy during this pandemic. We have conducted a prospective study to analyze that aspect.

Methods: All consecutive patients who visited during the lockdown period from April 1-10, 2020, for systemic chemotherapy were included in the study for a questionnaire-based survey to evaluate the willingness to continue chemotherapy during this pandemic and factors influencing the decisions.

Results: A total of 302 patients were included (median age, 56 years; range, 21-77 years). Most common sites of cancer were breast (n = 114), lung (n = 44), ovary (n = 34), and colon (n = 20). Home address was within the city for 125 patients (42%), outside the city for 138 (46%), and outside the state for 37 (12%). Treatment was curative in 150 patients and palliative in 152. Educational status was primary and above for 231 patients and no formal schooling for 71. A total of 203 patients wanted to continue chemotherapy, 40 wanted to defer, and 56 wanted the physician to decide. Knowledge about COVID-19 strongly correlated with intent of treatment ( = .01), disease status ( = .02), knowledge about immunosuppression ( < .001), home location ( = .02), and education status ( = .003). The worry about catching SARS-CoV-2 was high in those with controlled disease ( = .06) and knowledge about immunosuppression ( = .02). Worry about disease progression was more with palliative intent ( < .001).

Conclusion: This study shows that oncology patients in our country are more worried about disease progression than the SARS-CoV-2 and wish to continue chemotherapy during this pandemic. The treatment guidelines in the COVID-19 scenario should incorporate patients' perspectives.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/GO.20.00172DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7328097PMC
June 2020

Real world experience of treatment and outcome in ALK-rearranged metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer: A multicenter study from India.

Curr Probl Cancer 2020 06 17;44(3):100571. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, India. Electronic address:

Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearranged metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) comprises 5%-7% of all lung cancer and carries a good prognosis with available ALK-inhibitors. Majority of registration trials in ALK-inhibitors did not include Indian patients. Hence, this study was planned to analyze the outcome of Indian patients treated with ALK-inhibitors and associated challenges.

Methods: This is a multi-center study in 5 major tertiary care cancer centers across India treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients from April 2013 to April 2019. ALK rearrangement was determined by Ventana immunohistochemistry with D5F3 clone and/or by break-apart FISH. Patients treated with ALK-inhibitors in any lines of treatment were included in this study. Patients were evaluated for clinicopathologic features, patterns of ALK-inhibitors use and outcome. Progression free-survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated and data were censored on April 30, 2019.

Results: A total of 274 patients were studied, out of which 250 patients received ALK inhibitor and were analyzed further for outcome. The median age was 50 years (range: 24-82) and male to female ratio of 1.17:1. ALK was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in majority of patients (97%), 3 patients by FISH and 3 more patients were evaluated by both methods. Sixty-five percent (n = 162) of the patients received ALK-inhibitor as first line therapy, 51 patients received ALK-inhibitor as switch maintenance therapy after initial chemotherapy. Crizotinib and Ceritinib were used in 88% and 12%, respectively. One patient received Alectinib. Forty-one percent of patients had CNS progression. After median follow up of 27 months (1-72 months), the median OS was 24.7 months with OS rate of 72%, 51%, and 18% at 1, 2, and 4-years respectively. Median OS was 21.2, 26, and 38 months in the first line ALK-inhibitors use (n = 162), switch maintenance group (n = 51) and second line ALK-inhibitors use (postchemotherapy progression) (n = 33), respectively. No baseline variable predicted PFS. Presence of brain metastasis (P = 0.039) and first line ALK-inhibitors use (P = 0.032) emerged as poor prognostic factor for OS on multivariate analysis. PFS rate was 70%, 47%, and 31% at 6, 12, and 18 months respectively.

Conclusion: This is one of the largest real-world data on outcome of ALK inhibitors in ALK-rearranged NSCLC from Asia. In absence of second line ALK inhibitor, initial chemotherapy followed by ALK-inhibitors (switch maintenance) had better outcome. This fact may be studied in individual patient data meta-analysis. Poor performance status and brain metastases at presentation are poor prognostic factors for overall survival. Second-line ALK inhibitor use crucial for better outcome and access to clinical trials are much needed in Indian patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.currproblcancer.2020.100571DOI Listing
June 2020

Next generation sequencing in lung cancer: An initial experience from India.

Curr Probl Cancer 2020 06 28;44(3):100562. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Molecular Genetics, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Electronic address:

Introduction: Approximately 35% of NSCLC patients in East Asia have EGFR mutations. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides a comprehensive mutational profile in lung cancer patients.

Material And Method: Clinicopathologic characteristics and mutational profiling data was analyzed from nonsmall cell lung carcinoma /Adenocarcinoma over a duration of 42 months (October 2014 to March 2018) using next-generation sequencing Ion Ampliseq Cancer Hotspot panel v2 (Ampliseq, Life Technologies) on the Ion torrent PGM platform.

Results: A total of 154 cases were processed during this period. The average number of mutations/case varied from one to four 72.07% (111/154), of these cases had minimum one genetic alteration. The most common mutated gene was TP53 gene (37.6%, n = 58) followed by EGFR (32.4%, n = 50), KRAS (18.18%, n = 28), ERBB2 (3.2%, n = 5), BRAF (1.94%, n = 3). EGFR positivity was more in females (43.3%) and non-smokers (52.08%) in comparison to males (26.7%) and smokers (16.1%).

Conclusion: In this paper, we have described the comprehensive mutational profiling of a large cohort of advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients from the eastern part of India. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the largest studies from the country describing mutations in BRAF, ERBB2, TP53 genes and their clinicopathologic/histopathologic associations in lung cancers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.currproblcancer.2020.100562DOI Listing
June 2020

Utility and safety of maintenance chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer across various performance status categories: real-world experience.

Curr Probl Cancer 2020 06 5;44(3):100565. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India. Electronic address:

Maintenance chemotherapy (MC) with pemetrexed is a commonly used strategy in nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer. However, most of the available evidence is from subjects with good performance status (PS), while data on the real-world utility and safety of this strategy in subjects with various categories of PS is limited. We performed a retrospective analysis of multicentric data of 3 centers from India. All patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer who received MC with pemetrexed after induction chemotherapy were included. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score before initiation of induction chemotherapy as good PS (<2) and poor PS (≥2). Progression-free survival, overall survival, and toxicity were assessed in the study population. A total of 290 subjects were included in the study, of whom a significant proportion (n = 104, 35.9%) had poor PS. Survival was better in subjects with good PS as compared to those with poor PS (1-year progression-free survival: 43.5% vs 29.8%, P = 0.021; 1-year overall survival: 61.8% vs 48.1%, P = 0.023). Grade 3/4 toxicity was observed in 14.5% of subjects during MC and was not different between both groups (P = 0.287). Renal dysfunction was more common in subjects who received ≥10 cycles of MC (10.7% vs 4.2%, P = 0.040). MC with pemetrexed appeared to be beneficial and safe in the real-world setting regardless of the baseline PS. However, survival benefit was more pronounced in subjects with good PS at baseline. Renal dysfunction was more frequently encountered in subjects who received prolonged MC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.currproblcancer.2020.100565DOI Listing
June 2020

Clinicopathological characteristics and treatment outcome in small cell lung cancer: A single institutional experience from India.

Lung India 2020 Mar-Apr;37(2):134-139

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Background And Objectives: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) constitutes 14%-20% of all lung cancers. Clinical data on SCLC are scarce in literature. To report clinical features and treatment outcome of SCLC treated at our center.

Materials And Methods: This is a single institutional data review of SCLC patients treated between June 2011 and December 2018. Patients were staged as either localized or extensive disease after appropriate staging work-up. Patients with localized disease were treated with concurrent chemoradiation with platinum-based chemotherapy. Those with extensive disease were treated with platinum based palliative chemotherapy. Clinicopathological characteristics, treatment details, and outcome were recorded in this study. Patients who received at least one cycle of chemotherapy were included for survival analysis as intent-to-treat analysis.

Results: A total of 181 were patients registered with a median age of 62 years (range: 35-86 years) and male: female ratio of 166:15. Eighty-seven percent (n = 157) of patients had smoking history and 15% (n = 28) of patients had symptom of superior vena cava obstruction at baseline. Twenty-seven (15%) patients had localized disease at presentation. One hundred and twenty (66%) patients took systemic chemotherapy. Chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin only in 9 (7%), etoposide-carboplatin in 54 (45%), and cisplatin-etoposide in 57 (48%). Patients received median cycle number of 6 (range: 1-6). Of the evaluable 87 (73%) patients, initial response was complete response in 4, partial response in 57, stable disease in 20, and progressive disease in 6. Twenty patients received second-line chemotherapy at time of disease progression. After a median follow-up of 8.8 months (range: 0.3-46.1), median progression-free survival (PFS) of the whole population was 9.3 months.

Conclusions: Small cell carcinoma in our series had a high incidence of advanced stage (85%) and 13% of patients were nonsmoker. Only 66% of patients received palliative chemotherapy and achieved high disease control rate (>75%) in the evaluable patients with median PFS of 9.3 months.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/lungindia.lungindia_370_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7065549PMC
February 2020

Immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A metacentric experience from India.

Curr Probl Cancer 2020 06 23;44(3):100549. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Senior Consultant, Department of Medical Oncology, Chief of Thoracic Medical Services, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, India. Electronic address:

Background: Immune check point inhibitors (ICIs) have changed the treatment paradigm of driver mutation negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and they are increasingly incorporated in first-line treatment. Real-world experience of use of these drugs is limited. We aim to evaluate the real-world experience of use of ICIs in patients with advanced NSCLC.

Patients And Methods: Medical records of patients with NSCLC treated with ICIs at 4 major academic cancer centers in India between January 2016 and December 2018 were analyzed. The type of ICI taken, response rates, survival, and toxicity profiles were analyzed.

Results: The median age at presentation was 60 years (range: 27-79 years). Nivolumab was the most commonly used ICI drug [80%, n = 70] followed by pembrolizumab [10%, n = 9], and atezolizumab [10%, n = 9]. The median number of ICIs cycles received were 4 (range 2-65). Among the evaluable responses in 74 patients, the objective response rates was 25.6% and clinical benefit rate was 46%. Immune related toxicity occurred in 39.9% of patients but, severe toxicity of Grade III and Grade IV occurred in 5 (5.6%) patients. After a median follow-up time of 8.86 months (95%CI 5.2-11.1) the progression-free survival was 4.73 months (95%CI 3.7-8.9), and overall survival was 11.6 months (95%CI 7.33-NR). ECOG PS at the time of start of ICIs was found to be significant determinant of Progression-free survival and overall survival.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of usage of ICIs in advanced NSCLC in Indian setting with acceptable safety profile and comparable responses with the published studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.currproblcancer.2020.100549DOI Listing
June 2020

Radical radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for inoperable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer: Analysis of patient profile, treatment approaches, and outcomes for 213 patients at a tertiary cancer center.

Indian J Cancer 2018 Apr-Jun;55(2):125-133

Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Introduction: Radical radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent, with or without chemotherapy, is the standard treatment for inoperable, locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Materials And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data for all 288 patients who presented with inoperable, locally advanced NSCLC at our institution, between May 2011 and December 2016.

Results: RT alone or sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was used for 213 patients. Median age was 64 years (range: 27-88 years). Stage-III was the biggest stage group with 189 (88.7%) patients. Most patients with performance status (PS) 0 or 1 received CCRT, whereas most patients with PS 2 received RT alone (P < 0.001). CCRT, SCRT, and RT alone were used for 120 (56.3%), 24 (11.3%), and 69 (32.4%) patients, respectively. A third of all patients (32.4%) required either volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) or tomotherapy. Median follow-up was 16 months. The median progression-free survival and median overall survival (OS) were 11 and 20 months, respectively. One-year OS and 2-year OS were 67.9% and 40.7%, respectively. Patients treated using CCRT lived significantly longer with a median survival of 28 months, compared with 13 months using SCRT and RT alone (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, OS was significantly affected by age, stage group, treatment approach, and response to treatment.

Conclusion: RT including CCRT is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in our patient population and results in survival benefits comparable with published literature. CCRT should be considered for all patients with inoperable, locally advanced NSCLC, who are fit and have good PS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijc.IJC_469_17DOI Listing
April 2019

Metronomic therapy in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: Experience from a tertiary cancer care center.

Indian J Cancer 2018 Jan-Mar;55(1):94-97

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Background: Many agents have shown survival advantage in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Despite this improvement, survival is poor, especially in subgroup of elderly patients who are not fit for cytotoxic chemotherapy.

Materials And Methods: This is a single-institutional data review of mCRPC treated between December 2012 and May 2016 with oral cyclophosphamide (50-100 mg/day) ± oral prednisolone. mCRPCs failed or not fit for docetaxel and/or abiraterone were included in this study. Monthly prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was monitored, and toxicity of cyclophosphamide was recorded. PSA response was defined as ≥50% reduction from precyclophosphamide value. The median follow-up was calculated from the day of starting cyclophosphamide and the last date of follow-up or death, whichever is later.

Results: Eighteen patients were included with a median age of 74.5 years (range: 59-83). The site of metastasis was bone in 15, bone and distant lymph nodes in 2, and rectum in 1 patient. The median duration of androgen deprivation was 21 months (range: 3-42.9 months). The median cyclophosphamide exposure was 2 months (range: 0.9-13.5 months) after a median follow-up of 5.8 months. Overall PSA response rate was 44%. The median PSA progression-free survival with cyclophosphamide was 4.7 months (range: 0.9-13.5 months). Five patients had durable PSA response of 9.9, 10.1, 10.5, 12.1, and 13.5 months, respectively. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed with cyclophosphamide.

Conclusion: Oral metronomic cyclophosphamide was found to be an effective and well-tolerated therapy in mCRPC after failure or not fit for docetaxel and/or abiraterone. In few patients, cyclophosphamide induced durable PSA response. This finding needs further evaluation in a prospective manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijc.IJC_346_17DOI Listing
November 2018

Patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor testing across 111 tertiary care centers in India: Result of a questionnaire-based survey.

South Asian J Cancer 2018 Jul-Sep;7(3):203-206

Department of Medical Oncology, RGCI, New Delhi, India.

Background: We conducted a survey of 111 medical oncologists across India to understand the current pattern of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing at their respective centers.

Methods: Medical oncologists from 111 institutes across India were interviewed face to face using a structured questionnaire. They were divided into two groups - Group 1 with in-house EGFR testing and Group 2 who send samples to central/commercial laboratories outside their institutions. Answers of the two groups were analyzed to see the prevailing patterns of EGFR testing and differences between the two groups if any.

Results: Ninety-five percent (105/111) of medical oncologists recommended testing for EGFR mutations in patients with adenocarcinoma histology and 40% (44/111) recommended EGFR testing in squamous cell histology. The average time duration to get EGFR test results was 10 days in Group 1 centers versus 18 days in Group 2 centers. Ninety-six percent (106/111) of the medical oncologists from Group 1 centers requested for factoring additional sample for biomarker testing compared to 69% (77/111) of the oncologists from Group 2 centers. Sixty-nine percent (77/111) of medical oncologists in Group 1 centers would prefer to wait for the test results before initiating treatment compared to 46% (51/111) in Group 2. EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors were used in only approximately 60% of patients with diagnosed EGFR mutation in the first line. For patients in whom chemotherapy was initiated while waiting for test results, 50% (56/111) of medical oncologists would prefer to complete 4-6 cycles before switching to targeted therapy. At the time of progression, rebiopsy was possible in approximately 25% of the patients.

Conclusions: Turnaround time for molecular testing should improve so that eligible patients can benefit from targeted therapies in the first line. There is a need to increase the awareness among pulmonologists, oncologists, and interventional radiologists regarding the importance of adequate samples required for molecular tests.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/sajc.sajc_30_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6069335PMC
August 2018

Metastatic Gastric cancer: Real world scenario from a developing country.

South Asian J Cancer 2018 Jul-Sep;7(3):171-174

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Aim: Data on epidemiology and outcome in metastatic stomach carcinoma patients from India are scarce. We aimed to evaluate clinical features and treatment outcome in patients treated at our center.

Materials And Methods: This is a single institutional review of metastatic gastric carcinoma patients treated between May 2011 and October 2016. Patients who received at least one cycle of chemotherapy were included for modified intent-to-treat survival analysis.

Results: total of 143 patients were diagnosed with metastatic stomach carcinoma with a median age of 56 years (range: 29-86). The most common symptoms were abdominal pain in 112 (78%) patients. The most common site was body in 81 (57%) patients. Common site of metastasis was peritoneum in 86 (60%) and liver in (62%). Seventy-one (50%) patients were eligible for survival analysis. Common chemotherapy regimens were capecitabine-cisplatin in 27 (38%) and EOX in 22 (31%) patients. Survival status could not be assessed in 29 (41%) patients who lost to follow-up. After a median follow-up 9.7 months (range: 0.5-37.7), median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7.9 months (range: 0.5-23.9) and median overall survival (OS) was 12.2 months (range: 0.5-37.7). The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) ≥2 and the presence of linitis plastica showed a trend toward inferior PFS ( = 0.052 and 0.053, respectively) only in univariate analysis. Female sex and ECOG PS ≥2 predicted inferior OS in both univariate and multivariate analysis ( = 0.012, 0.02 and 0.03 and 0.05, respectively).

Conclusions: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy was used in the majority of patients. The overall outcome was comparable to that of the available literature. Female sex and ECOG PS ≥2 predicted the inferior outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/sajc.sajc_2_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6069341PMC
August 2018

In-transit metastases from malignant melanoma.

Natl Med J India 2017 Sep-Oct;30(5):297

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center 14 Major Arterial Road (EW), New Town, Rajarhat, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0970-258X.234405DOI Listing
December 2018

Consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer: When, in whom and how much?

Natl Med J India 2017 Jan-Feb;30(1):26-27

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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October 2019

Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: Is There Sufficient Evidence?

J Clin Oncol 2017 06 4;35(18):2095-2096. Epub 2017 May 4.

Bivas Biswas, Sandip Ganguly, Joydeep Ghosh, Prasad E, and Deepak Dabkara, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2017.72.8600DOI Listing
June 2017

Cytoreductive Nephrectomy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Era of Targeted Therapy: Scientifically Relevant or Natural Selection?

J Clin Oncol 2017 04 6;35(11):1265-1266. Epub 2017 Feb 6.

Bivas Biswas, Deepak Dabkara, Sandip Ganguly, Prasad Eswaran, and Joydeep Ghosh, Tata Medical Center, New Town, Rajarhat, Kolkata, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2016.70.8156DOI Listing
April 2017

Bevacizumab in Advanced Angiosarcoma: What Is the Reality?

J Clin Oncol 2016 Mar 28;34(7):764. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Tata Medical Center, Kolkata, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2015.64.2181DOI Listing
March 2016

Survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer with or without locoregional therapy.

Lancet Oncol 2015 Dec;16(16):e586-7

Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Medical Center, Kolkata 700156, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00453-2DOI Listing
December 2015

Long-term survivor of human immunodeficiency virus-associated plasmablastic lymphoma.

Indian J Med Paediatr Oncol 2013 Apr;34(2):96-8

Department of Medical Oncology, Dr. B. R. A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL) is a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) having a strong association with immunosuppression, especially, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It generally has a poor prognosis with most patients dying within 2 years from initial presentation, and long-term survivors are very few. We report the case of a 10-years-old child, presenting in 2003 with swelling on the right side of the face and fever of 2 months. Evaluation revealed a mass in the right palatal and upper alveolar region with extensive spread and bone destruction, regional adenopathy, mass lesion in the liver and hepatosplenomegaly without bone marrow involvement. Histopathology was suggestive of the PL and patient tested positive for HIV. He was started on high grade NHL chemotherapy protocol along with highly-active anti-retroviral therapy HAART. He responded well and is in complete remission since 8 years of completion of treatment and is on HAART.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0971-5851.116187DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3764752PMC
April 2013