Publications by authors named "Deborah Moskowitz"

3 Publications

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A comprehensive review of the safety and efficacy of bioidentical hormones for the management of menopause and related health risks.

Altern Med Rev 2006 Sep;11(3):208-23

Numerous forms of estrogens and progestins are utilized for the treatment of menopausal complaints and associated conditions that occur temporally. Although known to be different with respect to molecular structure, receptor affinity, metabolism, and other physiological traits, most have been treated as if they were clinically identical. The majority of these hormone preparations, commonly referred to as hormone replacement therapy (HRT), should perhaps be more aptly referred to as hormone substitution therapy, as most of the therapies utilized do not exactly match those produced in the body. Research indicates these synthetic hormones vary clinically in safety and efficacy. As such, women and their physicians have, in increasing numbers, been opting for the use of bioidentical hormones; i.e., those that match the structure and function of hormones produced in the body. With greater utilization and research surrounding bioidentical hormones, the differences can now begin to be fully assessed and appreciated. This article reviews the disparities between synthetic and bioidentical estrogens and progestins/progesterone with respect to safety and efficacy; special attention is devoted to clinical outcomes in the breast, endometrium, bone, cardiovascular system, and brain. The studies reviewed suggest bioidentical progesterone does not have a negative effect on blood lipids or vasculature as do many synthetic progestins, and may carry less risk with respect to breast cancer incidence. Studies of both bioidentical estrogens and progesterone suggest a reduced risk of blood clots compared to non-bioidentical preparations. Bioidentical hormone preparations have demonstrated effectiveness in addressing menopausal symptoms. The author advocates for continued research on bioidentical hormones and concludes there is currently sufficient evidence to support their preferred use over that of their synthetic cousins.
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September 2006

Comment on "Bioidentical hormone therapy: a review".

Menopause 2004 Nov-Dec;11(6 Pt 1):639; author reply 639-41

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.gme.0000143550.20792.f5DOI Listing
March 2005

Tryptophan, serotonin and human social behavior.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2003 ;527:215-24

Department of Psychology, McGill University, 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1B1.

Animals research suggests that increasing serotonin can decrease aggression, increase affiliative behaviors and increase dominant behaviors. We tested the relevance of these data to humans by giving 100 healthy people tryptophan (1 g after each meal) and placebo, each for 12 days in a double-blind cross-over study. Social behaviors were studied using an event sampling method in which subjects filled in a one page questionnaire about their behaviors after each social interaction lasting at least 5 minutes. Tryptophan caused a significant decrease in quarrelsome behaviors and a significant increase in dominant behaviors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-0135-0_25DOI Listing
September 2004