Publications by authors named "Deborah Devor-Henneman"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Postnatal expansion of the pancreatic beta-cell mass is dependent on survivin.

Diabetes 2008 Oct 3;57(10):2718-27. Epub 2008 Jul 3.

The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Objective: Diabetes results from a deficiency of functional beta-cells due to both an increase in beta-cell death and an inhibition of beta-cell replication. The molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects in susceptible individuals are mostly unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether a gene critical for cell division and cell survival in cancer cells, survivin, might also be important for beta-cells.

Research Design And Methods: We generated mice harboring a conditional deletion of survivin in pancreatic endocrine cells using mice with a Pax-6-Cre transgene promoter construct driving tissue-specific expression of Cre-recombinase in these cells. We performed metabolic studies and immunohistochemical analyses to determine the effects of a mono- and biallelic deletion of survivin.

Results: Selective deletion of survivin in pancreatic endocrine cells in the mouse had no discernible effects during embryogenesis but was associated with striking decreases in beta-cell number after birth, leading to hyperglycemia and early-onset diabetes by 4 weeks of age. Serum insulin levels were significantly decreased in animals lacking endocrine cell survivin, with relative stability of other hormones. Exogenous expression of survivin in mature beta-cells lacking endogenous survivin completely rescued the hyperglycemic phenotype and the decrease in beta-cell mass, confirming the specificity of the survivin effect in these cells.

Conclusions: Our findings implicate survivin in the maintenance of beta-cell mass through both replication and antiapoptotic mechanisms. Given the widespread involvement of survivin in cancer, a novel role for survivin may well be exploited in beta-cell regulation in diseased states, such as diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db08-0170DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2551682PMC
October 2008

Fibro-osseous (FOL) and degenerative joint lesions in female outbred NIH Black Swiss mice.

Toxicol Pathol 2008 Feb 24;36(2):362-5. Epub 2008 Mar 24.

College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA.

A review of spontaneous bone and joint lesions in female aging NIH Black Swiss mice (Cr:NIH BL[S]) revealed a high incidence of fibro-osseous lesions (FOL; 89%) and degenerative joint lesions (90%). FOL was characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrovascular tissue and was first seen at 59 weeks of age, most commonly in the nasal bone, femur, and tibia. FOL in female Black Swiss was often accompanied by reproductive-tract lesions, including ovarian atrophy and uterine cervical dysplasia with hydrometra. Mild degenerative femorotibial joint lesions developed by 59 weeks and progressed to full-thickness articular cartilage ulceration and osteophyte development by 75 weeks; joint inflammation was minimal. Although the underlying etiology of FOL remains unknown, an accurate assessment of FOL and degenerative joint disease as background lesions in this stock is necessary to interpret lesions in genetically engineered mice produced from this outbred line.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0192623307312697DOI Listing
February 2008

Cerebellar ataxia, seizures, premature death, and cardiac abnormalities in mice with targeted disruption of the Cacna2d2 gene.

Am J Pathol 2004 Sep;165(3):1007-18

Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, USA.

CACNA2D2 is a putative tumor suppressor gene located in the human chromosome 3p21.3 region that shows frequent allelic imbalances in lung, breast, and other cancers. The alpha2delta-2 protein encoded by the gene is a regulatory subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels and is expressed in brain, heart, and other tissues. Here we report that mice homozygous for targeted disruption of the Cacna2d2 gene exhibit growth retardation, reduced life span, ataxic gait with apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells followed by Purkinje cell depletion, enhanced susceptibility to seizures, and cardiac abnormalities. The Cacna2d2(tm1NCIF) null phenotype has much in common with that of Cacna1a mutants, such as cerebellar neuro-degeneration associated with ataxia, seizures, and premature death. A tendency to bradycardia and limited response of null mutants to isoflurane implicate alpha2delta-2 in sympathetic regulation of cardiac function. In summary, our findings provide genetic evidence that the alpha2delta-2 subunit serves in vivo as a component of P/Q-type calcium channels, is indispensable for the central nervous system function, and may be involved in hereditary cerebellar ataxias and epileptic disorders in humans.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1618598PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9440(10)63362-7DOI Listing
September 2004

Mouse models of human familial cancer syndromes.

Toxicol Pathol 2004 Mar-Apr;32 Suppl 1:90-8

Veterinary and Tumor Pathology Section, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201, USA.

As many as 5% of human cancers appear to be of hereditable etiology. Of the more than 50 characterized familial cancer syndromes, most involve disease affecting multiple organs and many can be traced to one or more abnormalities in specific genes. Studying these syndromes in humans is a difficult task, especially when it comes to genes that may manifest themselves early in gestation. It has been made somewhat easier with the development of genetically engineered mice (GEM) that phenotypically mimic many of these inheritable human cancers. The past 15 years has seen the establishment of mouse lines heterozygous or homozygous null for genes known or suspected of being involved in human cancer syndromes, including APC, ATM, BLM, BRCA1, BRCA2, LKB1, MEN1, MLH, MSH, NF1, TP53, PTEN, RB1, TSC1, TSC2, VHL, and XPA. These lines not only provide models for clinical disease and pathology, but also provide avenues to investigate molecular pathology, gene-gene and protein-tissue interaction, and, ultimately, therapeutic intervention. Possibly of even greater importance, they provide a means of looking at placental and fetal tissues, where genetic abnormalities are often first detected and where they may be most easily corrected. We will review these mouse models, examine their usefulness in medical research, and furnish sources of animals and references.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01926230490424680DOI Listing
October 2004

Hematopoietic, angiogenic and eye defects in Meis1 mutant animals.

EMBO J 2004 Jan 8;23(2):450-9. Epub 2004 Jan 8.

Center for Cancer Research, Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD, USA.

Meis1 and Hoxa9 expression is upregulated by retroviral integration in murine myeloid leukemias and in human leukemias carrying MLL translocations. Both genes also cooperate to induce leukemia in a mouse leukemia acceleration assay, which can be explained, in part, by their physical interaction with each other as well as the PBX family of homeodomain proteins. Here we show that Meis1-deficient embryos have partially duplicated retinas and smaller lenses than normal. They also fail to produce megakaryocytes, display extensive hemorrhaging, and die by embryonic day 14.5. In addition, Meis1-deficient embryos lack well-formed capillaries, although larger blood vessels are normal. Definitive myeloerythroid lineages are present in the mutant embryos, but the total numbers of colony-forming cells are dramatically reduced. Mutant fetal liver cells also fail to radioprotect lethally irradiated animals and they compete poorly in repopulation assays even though they can repopulate all hematopoietic lineages. These and other studies showing that Meis1 is expressed at high levels in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) suggest that Meis1 may also be required for the proliferation/self-renewal of the HSC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.emboj.7600038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1271748PMC
January 2004