Publications by authors named "Deanna Streck"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Simple Reverse Transcriptase PCR Melting-Temperature Assay To Rapidly Screen for Widely Circulating SARS-CoV-2 Variants.

J Clin Microbiol 2021 Sep 21;59(10):e0084521. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Public Health Research Institute, Center for Emerging Pathogens, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, USA.

The increased transmission of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC), which originated in the United Kingdom (B.1.1.7/alpha), South Africa (B1.351/beta), Brazil (P.1/gamma), the United States (B.1.427/429 or epsilon), and India (B.1.617.2/delta), requires a vigorous public health response, including real-time strain surveillance on a global scale. Although genome sequencing is the gold standard for identifying these VOCs, it is time-consuming and expensive. Here, we describe a simple, rapid, and high-throughput reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) melting-temperature () screening assay that identifies the first three major VOCs. RT-PCR primers and four sloppy molecular beacon (SMB) probes were designed to amplify and detect the SARS-CoV-2 N501Y (A23063T) and E484K (G23012A) mutations and their corresponding wild-type sequences. After RT-PCR, the VOCs were identified by a characteristic of each SMB. Assay optimization and testing was performed with RNA from SARS-CoV-2 USA WA1/2020 (wild type [WT]), B.1.1.7, and B.1.351 variant strains. The assay was then validated using clinical samples. The limit of detection for both the WT and variants was 4 and 10 genomic copies/reaction for the 501- and 484-codon assays, respectively. The assay was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for identifying the N501Y and E484K mutations in cultured virus and in clinical samples, as confirmed by Sanger sequencing. We have developed an RT-PCR melt screening test for the major VOCs that can be used to rapidly screen large numbers of patient samples, providing an early warning for the emergence of these variants and a simple way to track their spread.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00845-21DOI Listing
September 2021

A Simple RT-PCR Melting temperature Assay to Rapidly Screen for Widely Circulating SARS-CoV-2 Variants.

medRxiv 2021 Apr 8. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Public Health Research Institute; Center for Emerging Pathogens, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

Background: The increased transmission of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC) which originated in the United Kingdom (B.1.1.7), South Africa (B1.351), Brazil (P.1) and in United States (B.1.427/429) requires a vigorous public health response, including real time strain surveillance on a global scale. Although genome sequencing is the gold standard for identifying these VOCs, it is time consuming and expensive. Here, we describe a simple, rapid and high-throughput reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) melting temperature (Tm) screening assay that identifies these three major VOCs.

Methods: RT-PCR primers and four sloppy molecular beacon (SMB) probes were designed to amplify and detect the SARS-CoV-2 N501Y (A23063T) and E484K (G23012A) mutations and their corresponding wild type sequences. After RT-PCR, the VOCs were identified by a characteristic Tm of each SMB. Assay optimization and testing was performed with RNA from SARS-CoV-2 USA WA1/2020 (WT), a B.1.17 and a B.1.351 variant strains. The assay was then validated using clinical samples.

Results: The limit of detection (LOD) for both the WT and variants was 4 and 10 genomic copies/reaction for the 501 and 484 codon assays, respectively. The assay was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for identifying the N501Y and E484K mutations in cultured virus and in clinical samples as confirmed by Sanger sequencing.

Conclusion: We have developed an RT-PCR melt screening test for the three major VOCs which can be used to rapidly screen large numbers of patient samples providing an early warning for the emergence of these variants and a simple way to track their spread.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/2021.03.05.21252709DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7987051PMC
April 2021

The Role of Immunological Synapse in Predicting the Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Immunotherapy.

Cell Commun Signal 2020 08 25;18(1):134. Epub 2020 Aug 25.

Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers University- New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, Newark, NJ, 07103, USA.

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) immunotherapy utilizes genetically-engineered immune cells that express a unique cell surface receptor that combines tumor antigen specificity with immune cell activation. In recent clinical trials, the adoptive transfer of CAR-modified immune cells (including CAR-T and CAR-NK cells) into patients has been remarkably successful in treating multiple refractory blood cancers. To improve safety and efficacy, and expand potential applicability to other cancer types, CARs with different target specificities and sequence modifications are being developed and tested by many laboratories. Despite the overall progress in CAR immunotherapy, conventional tools to design and evaluate the efficacy and safety of CAR immunotherapies can be inaccurate, time-consuming, costly, and labor-intensive. Furthermore, existing tools cannot always determine how responsive individual patients will be to a particular CAR immunotherapy. Recent work in our laboratory suggests that the quality of the immunological synapse (IS) can accurately predict CAR-modified cell efficacy (and toxicity) that can correlate with clinical outcomes. Here we review current efforts to develop a Synapse Predicts Efficacy (SPE) system for easy, rapid and cost-effective evaluation of CAR-modified immune cell immunotherapy. Ultimately, we hypothesize the conceptual basis and clinical application of SPE will serve as an important parameter in evaluating CAR immunotherapy and significantly advance precision cancer immunotherapy. Video abstract Graphic abstract for manuscript CCAS-D-20-00136 by Liu, D., et al., 'The Role of Immunological Synapse in Predicting the Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Immunotherapy". The various branches of evaluating cancer immunotherapy metaphorically represented as a Rubik's cube. The development of a novel approach to predict the effectiveness of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-modified cells by quantifying the quality of CAR IS will introduce a new parameter to the rapidly expanding field of cancer immunotherapy. Currently, no single parameter can predict the clinical outcome or efficacy of a specific type of CAR-modified cell. IS quality will serve as a quantifiable measure to evaluate CAR products and can be used in conjunction with other conventional parameters to form a composite clinical predictor. Much like a Rubik's cube has countless configurations, several methods and combinations of clinical metrics have arisen for evaluating the ability of a given immunotherapeutic strategy to treat cancer. The quality of IS depicting cancer immunotherapy is metaphorically expressed as a Rubik's cube. Each face/color represents one aspect of cancer therapy. Each grid in one face indicates one factor within that aspect of cancer therapy. For example, the green color represents the tumor microenvironment, and one out of the nine grids in the green color indicates suppressor cells (suppressors in green). Changes in one factor may completely alter the entire strategy of cancer therapy. However, the quality of IS (illuminated center red grid) makes the effectiveness of CAR immunotherapy predictable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12964-020-00617-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7446110PMC
August 2020

MicroRNA expression changes in association with changes in interleukin-1ß/interleukin10 ratios produced by monocytes in autism spectrum disorders: their association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and comorbid conditions (observational study).

J Neuroinflammation 2017 Nov 25;14(1):229. Epub 2017 Nov 25.

Clinical cytogenetics/Department of Hematopathology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major role in regulating immune responses at post-transcriptional levels. Previously, we have reported fluctuating interlukine-1ß (IL-1ß)/IL-10 ratios produced by peripheral blood monocytes (PBMo) in some patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study examined whether changes in miRNA expression by PBMo are associated with changes in IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios and how such changes are associated with ASD clinical features.

Methods: miRNA expression by purified PBMo from ASD subjects (N = 69) and non-ASD controls (N = 27) were determined by high-throughput sequencing. Cytokine production by PBMo in responses to stimuli of innate immunity, and behavioral symptoms [assessed by aberrant behavioral checklist (ABC)] were also evaluated at the same time of sample obtainment.

Results: As a whole, there was no difference in miRNA expression between ASD and control non-ASD PBMo. However, when ASD cells were subdivided into 3 groups with high, normal, or low IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios as defined in the "Results" section, in comparison with the data obtained from non-ASD controls, we observed marked changes in miRNA expression. Namely, over 3-fold changes in expression of miR-181a, miR-93, miR-223, miR-342, and miR-1248 were observed in ASD PBMo with high or low IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios, but not in ASD PBMo with normal ratios. These miRNAs that had altered in expression are those closely associated with the regulation of key signaling pathways. With changes in IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios, we also observed changes in the production of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-ß) other than IL-1ß/IL-10 by ASD PBMo. The association between behavioral symptoms and cytokine levels was different when ASD cells exhibit high/low IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios vs. when ASD cells exhibited normal ratios. Non-IgE-mediated food allergy was also observed at higher frequency in ASD subjects with high/low IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios than with normal ratios.

Conclusions: Changes in cytokine profiles and miRNA expression by PBMo appear to be associated with changes in ASD behavioral symptoms. miRNAs that are altered in expression in ASD PBMo with high/low IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios are those associated with inflammatory responses. Changes in IL-1ß/IL-10 ratios along with changes in miRNA expression may serve as biomarkers for immune-mediated inflammation in ASD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12974-017-1003-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5702092PMC
November 2017

A multicenter, cross-platform clinical validation study of cancer cytogenomic arrays.

Cancer Genet 2015 Nov 28;208(11):525-36. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.

Cytogenomic microarray analysis (CMA) offers high resolution, genome-wide copy number information and is widely used in clinical laboratories for diagnosis of constitutional abnormalities. The Cancer Genomics Consortium (CGC) conducted a multiplatform, multicenter clinical validation project to compare the reliability and inter- and intralaboratory reproducibility of this technology for clinical oncology applications. Four specimen types were processed on three different microarray platforms-from Affymetrix, Agilent, and Illumina. Each microarray platform was employed at two independent test sites. The results were compared in a blinded manner with current standard methods, including karyotype, FISH, or morphology. Twenty-nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia blood, 34 myelodysplastic syndrome bone marrow, and 30 fresh frozen renal epithelial tumor samples were assessed by all six laboratories. Thirty formalin fixed paraffin embedded renal tumor samples were analyzed at the Affymetrix and Agilent test sites only. All study samples were initial diagnostic samples. Array data were analyzed at each participating site and were submitted to caArray for central analysis. Laboratory interpretive results were submitted to the central analysis team for comparison with the standard-of-care assays and for calculation of intraplatform reproducibility and cross-platform concordance. The results demonstrated that the three microarray platforms 1) detect clinically actionable genomic changes in cancer compatible to standard-of-care methods; 2) further define cytogenetic aberrations; 3) identify submicroscopic alterations and loss of heterozygosity (LOH); and 4) yield consistent results within and between laboratories. Based on this study, the CGC concludes that CMA is a sensitive and reliable technique for copy number and LOH assessment that may be used for clinical oncology genomic analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cancergen.2015.08.002DOI Listing
November 2015

Immunological characterization and transcription profiling of peripheral blood (PB) monocytes in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD): case study.

J Neuroinflammation 2012 Jan 7;9. Epub 2012 Jan 7.

Division of Allergy/Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Department of pediatrics, UMDN-NJMS, 185 South Orange Ave, Newark, NJ 07101-1709, USA.

Introduction: There exists a small subset of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) characterized by fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills following immune insults. Some of these children also exhibit specific polysaccharide antibody deficiency (SPAD), resulting in frequent infection caused by encapsulated organisms, and they often require supplemental intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (ASD/SPAD). This study assessed whether these ASD/SPAD children have distinct immunological findings in comparison with ASD/non-SPAD or non-ASD/SPAD children.

Case Description: We describe 8 ASD/SPAD children with worsening behavioral symptoms/cognitive skills that are triggered by immune insults. These ASD/SPAD children exhibited delayed type food allergy (5/8), treatment-resistant seizure disorders (4/8), and chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (5/8) at high frequencies. Control subjects included ASD children without SPAD (N = 39), normal controls (N = 37), and non-ASD children with SPAD (N = 12).

Discussion And Evaluation: We assessed their innate and adaptive immune responses, by measuring the production of pro-inflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in responses to agonists of toll like receptors (TLR), stimuli of innate immunity, and T cell stimulants. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes was also assessed. ASD/SPAD PBMCs produced less proinflammatory cytokines with agonists of TLR7/8 (IL-6, IL-23), TLR2/6 (IL-6), TLR4 (IL-12p40), and without stimuli (IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α) than normal controls. In addition, cytokine production of ASD/SPAD PBMCs in response to T cell mitogens (IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-12p40) and candida antigen (Ag) (IL-10, IL-12p40) were less than normal controls. ASD/non-SPAD PBMDs revealed similar results as normal controls, while non-ASD/SPAD PBMCs revealed lower production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-23 with a TLR4 agonist. Only common features observed between ASD/SPAD and non-ASD/SPAD children is lower IL-10 production in the absence of stimuli. Transcription profiling of PB monocytes revealed over a 2-fold up (830 and 1250) and down (653 and 1235) regulation of genes in ASD/SPAD children, as compared to normal (N = 26) and ASD/non-SPAD (N = 29) controls, respectively. Enriched gene expression of TGFBR (p < 0.005), Notch (p < 0.01), and EGFR1 (p < 0.02) pathways was found in the ASD/SPAD monocytes as compared to ASD/non-SPAD controls.

Conclusions: The Immunological findings in the ASD/SPAD children who exhibit fluctuating behavioral symptoms and cognitive skills cannot be solely attributed to SPAD. Instead, these findings may be more specific for ASD/SPAD children with the above-described clinical characteristics, indicating a possible role of these immune abnormalities in their neuropsychiatric symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1742-2094-9-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275444PMC
January 2012

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who exhibit chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and marked fluctuation of behavioral symptoms exhibit distinct innate immune abnormalities and transcriptional profiles of peripheral blood (PB) monocytes.

J Neuroimmunol 2011 Sep 30;238(1-2):73-80. Epub 2011 Jul 30.

Division of Allergy/Immunology and Infection Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Ave, Newark, NJ 07101-1709, USA.

Innate/adaptive immune responses and transcript profiles of peripheral blood monocytes were studied in ASD children who exhibit fluctuating behavioral symptoms following infection and other immune insults (ASD/Inf, N=30). The ASD/Inf children with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms (ASD/Inf+GI, N=19), revealed less production of proinflammatory and counter-regulatory cytokines with stimuli of innate immunity and marked changes in transcript profiles of monocytes as compared to ASD/no-Inf (N=28) and normal (N=26) controls. This included a 4-5 fold up-regulation of chemokines (CCL2 and CCL7), consistent with the production of more CCL2 by ASD/Inf+GI cells. These results indicate dysregulated innate immune defense in the ASD/Inf+GI children, rendering them more vulnerable to common microbial infection/dysbiosis and possibly subsequent behavioral changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroim.2011.07.001DOI Listing
September 2011

Molecular and immunohistochemical evidence for the origin of uterine leiomyosarcomas from associated leiomyoma and symplastic leiomyoma-like areas.

Mod Pathol 2009 Oct 24;22(10):1303-11. Epub 2009 Jul 24.

Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, 462 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA.

It is uncertain whether uterine leiomyosarcoma arises de novo or in preexisting leiomyoma. Leiomyoma-like areas can be seen associated with uterine leiomyosarcoma, raising the possibility of precursor lesions for uterine leiomyosarcoma. In this study, we examined cases of uterine leiomyosarcoma associated with leiomyoma-like areas at the histological, immunohistochemical and DNA level to further evaluate if benign-looking leiomyoma-like and uterine leiomyosarcoma areas are related. Cases of uterine leiomyosarcoma observed at the New York University Medical Center from 1994 to 2007 were reviewed for the presence of leiomyoma-like areas. Of the 26 cases of uterine leiomyosarcoma observed during this period, 18 cases had an associated leiomyoma-like area (five cellular leiomyoma, four symplastic leiomyoma, four cellular and symplastic leiomyoma and five usual type leiomyoma). Sixteen of the 18 cases were examined immunohistochemically for Ki-67, for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and for p53. Immunohistochemical profiles were as expected for leiomyoma-like (the mean expression of p53, ER, PR and Ki-67 at 0.3, 63, 75 and 0.6%, respectively), symplastic leiomyoma-like areas (the mean expression of p53, ER, PR and Ki-67 at 0.6, 85, 89 and 5.5%, respectively) and uterine leiomyosarcoma areas (the mean expression of p53, ER, PR and Ki-67 at 52, 38, 39 and 61%, respectively). In six cases, the leiomyoma-like and uterine leiomyosarcoma areas from each case were examined using high-density oligonucleotide array-CGH to determine genetic aberrations in the two areas. Nearly all the genetic aberrations found in leiomyoma-like areas were also found in the corresponding uterine leiomyosarcoma areas. In addition, uterine leiomyosarcoma areas had additional genetic aberrations. The immunohistochemical profiles and genetic aberrations of the examined cases suggest that uterine leiomyosarcoma could arise from the preexisting leiomyoma-like areas that often have a symplastic or cellular morphology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/modpathol.2009.96DOI Listing
October 2009

Genome profiling of chondrosarcoma using oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

Cancer Genet Cytogenet 2009 Jul;192(2):56-9

Institute of Genomic Medicine, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 225 Warren Street, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.

Chondrosarcomas of the bone are malignant hyaline cartilage-forming tumors with an annual incidence rate of 3.6% of all primary bone malignancies in the United States. Specimens of 25 chondrosarcomas (10 grade I, 9 grade II, 1 grade III, and 5 dedifferentiated) from 23 patients were collected from the Department of Pathology at the University Hospital at UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School from 1996 to 2007. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) studies were performed on frozen tumor specimens. Recurrent deletions observed in at least in six tumors were 5q13.2, 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q12 approximately q13, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There was a statistically significant association between high-grade tumor (grade III and dedifferentiated) and the recurrent genetic deletions at 5q14.2 approximately q21.3, 6q16 approximately q25.3, 9p24.2 approximately q12, and 9p21.3. There is consistency between increased levels of aneuploidy and the progression of chondrosarcoma from lower to higher grades.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cancergencyto.2009.03.009DOI Listing
July 2009

Exclusion of APC and VHL gene deletions by array-based comparative hybridization in two patients with microscopically visible chromosomal aberrations.

Cancer Genet Cytogenet 2007 Oct;178(2):151-4

Genetics Service, Department of Pediatrics, Joseph M Sanzari Children's Hospital, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ 07601, USA.

Karyotyping is a major component of the genetic work-up of patients with dysmorphism. Cytogenetic aberrations close to a known tumor suppressor gene raise important clinical issues because deletion of that tumor suppressor gene can cause genetic predisposition to cancer. We present two cancer-free dysmorphic patients with karyotypes of 46,XX,del(5)(q15q22.3) and 46,XX,del(3)(p25.2~pter). These deletions are close to the APC and VHL genes that confer susceptibility to familial Adenomatous polyposis (OMIM #17510) and von-Hippel-Lindau syndrome (OMIM #193300), respectively. The array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis using a custom Agilent 44K oligonucleotide array demonstrated an interstitial 20.7-megabase (Mb) deletion on 5q (chr5: 89,725,638-110,491,345) and a terminal 9.45-Mb deletion on 3p (chr3:pter-9,450,984). According to the March 2006 human reference sequence, the APC gene is located at chr5: 112,101,483-112,209,835 and the VHL gene is located at chr3: 10,158,319-10,168,746. These results indicate that the APC gene is 2,300 kilobases (kb) and the VHL gene is 700 kb away from deleted regions. Southern blot analysis for APC and VHL genes were negative, consistent with array-CGH findings. These results demonstrate the power of array-CCH to assess potential tumor suppressor gene involvement and cancer risk in patients with microscopically visible deletions in areas near tumor suppressors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cancergencyto.2007.07.014DOI Listing
October 2007

Molecular signatures of trauma-hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury: hemorrhage- and injury-associated genes.

Shock 2007 Sep;28(3):360-8

Department of Surgery, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey 07103, USA.

The etiology of trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS)-induced acute lung injury has been difficult to elucidate because of, at least in part, the inability of in vivo studies to separate the noninjurious pulmonary effects of trauma-hemorrhage from the tissue-injurious ones. To circumvent this in vivo limitation, we used a model of T/HS in which T/HS lung injury was abrogated by dividing the mesenteric lymph duct. In this way, it was possible to separate the pulmonary injurious response from the noninjurious systemic response to T/HS by comparing the pulmonary molecular responses of rats subjected to T/HS, which did and did not develop lung injury, with those of nonshocked rats. Using high-density oligonucleotide arrays and treatment group comparisons of whole lung tissue collected at 3 h after the end of the shock or sham-shock period, 139 of 8,799 assessed genes were identified by significant analysis of microarrays. Hemorrhage without the secondary effects of lung injury modulated the expression of 21 genes such as interleukin 1beta, metallothionein-2, and myeloctomatosis oncogene (c-myc). In response to injury, 42 genes were identified to be differentially expressed. Upregulated genes included the L1 retroposon and guanine deaminase, whereas downregulated genes included catalase and superoxide dismutase 1. Real-time polymerase chain reaction confirmed the differential expression for selected genes. PathwayAssist analysis identified interleukin 1beta as a central regulator of two subpathways of stress response-related genes (c-myc and superoxide dismutase 1/catalase) as well as several unrelated genes such as lipoprotein lipase. Our model system provided a unique opportunity to distinguish the molecular changes associated with T/HS-induced acute lung injury from the systemic molecular response to T/HS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/shk.0b013e318048565bDOI Listing
September 2007

Microtransponder-based multiplex assay for genotyping cystic fibrosis.

Clin Chem 2007 Jul 17;53(7):1372-6. Epub 2007 May 17.

PharmaSeq, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852, USA.

Background: We developed and evaluated a genotyping assay for detection of 50 cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations. The assay is based on small (500 microm) electronic chips, radio frequency (RF) microtransponders (MTPs). The chips are analyzed on a unique fluorescence and RF readout instrument.

Methods: We divided the CF assay into 4 panels: core, Hispanic, African-American, and Caucasian. We amplified 18 CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) DNA fragments covering 50 mutations by use of multiplex PCR using 18 CFTR gene-specific primer pairs. PCR was followed by multiplex allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) reactions and hybridization to capture probes synthesized on MTPs. We used 100 ASPE primers and 100 capture probes. We performed fluorescence measurements of hybridized MTP kits and assay analysis using a custom automated bench-top flow instrument.

Results: We validated the system by performing the assay on 23 commercial DNA samples in an internal study and 32 DNA samples in an external study. For internal and external studies, correct calls were 98.8% and 95.7%, false-positive calls 1.1% and 3.9%, and false-negative calls 0.12% and 0.36%, respectively.

Conclusions: The MTP-based multiplex assay and analysis platform can be used for CF genotyping.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2006.081810DOI Listing
July 2007

An oligonucleotide based array-CGH system for detection of genome wide copy number changes including subtelomeric regions for genetic evaluation of mental retardation.

Am J Med Genet A 2007 Apr;143A(8):824-9

Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, UMDNJ, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey 07103, USA.

Developmental delay (DD) and mental retardation (MR) are important child heath issues with a one percent prevalence. Karyotyping with or without subtelomeric FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization), unless the phenotype of the patient suggests a specific aberration for a specific FISH assay, is the most common procedure in cytogenetic evaluation of MR/DD. In addition, there are several platforms utilizing microarray based comparative genomic hybridization technology (array-CGH) for genetic testing. Array-CGH can detect deletions or duplications in very small segments of chromosomes and the use of this technology is expected to increase the diagnostic yield. The major limitation of the current BAC based array technologies is the low resolution ( approximately 1 Mb) of the chip and suboptimal coverage particularly in the subtelomeric regions. Our aim was to design a novel array-CGH chip with high-density of probes in the subtelomeric regions as well as to maintain sufficient density in other regions of the genome to provide comprehensive coverage for DD/MR. For this purpose, we used Human Genome CGH Microarray 44B chip (Agilent) as the template for the novel design. Using e-array 4.0 (Agilent), one third of the probes were randomly removed from the array and replaced by 14,000 subtelomeric probes. The average density of the probe coverage is 125 kb and 250-400 probes interrogate subtelomeric regions. To evaluate the array, we tested 15 samples (including subtelomeric aberrations and other microdeletion syndromes), which were previously analyzed by karyotyping and/or FISH. The concordance rate between array results and previous results is 100%. In addition we detected two novel aberrations that were not detected by karyotyping. These results demonstrate the utility of this format of array-CGH in detecting genome wide submicroscopic copy number changes as well as providing comprehensive coverage of all subteleomeric regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.31656DOI Listing
April 2007

High incidence of two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations (C677T and A1298C) in Hispanics.

Genet Test 2003 ;7(3):255-7

Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics and the Center for Human and Molecular Genetics, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, Newark, NJ 07103, USA.

Mutations in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and coagulation factors II and V genes have been found at high frequencies in European and American Caucasian populations and are associated with increased risk for thrombophilia, premature coronary artery disease, and a variety of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Hispanic populations in the United States exhibit high levels of some of these conditions, so we initiated a population-based study to determine the frequency of these mutations (MTHFR C677T and A1298C, Factor II G20210A and Factor V G1691A) in this group. We find comparable frequencies of the Factors II and V mutations, but a high incidence of the two MTHFR mutations in a diverse sample of American Hispanics compared to those reported in Caucasians. Prospective studies of Hispanic women with these mutations and pregnancy outcomes will establish if there is a causal relationship.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/109065703322537296DOI Listing
June 2004
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