Publications by authors named "Dea Donikian"

5 Publications

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Effect of sample heat inactivation on test levels of HIT-IgG detected by the ACL AcuStar.

Thromb Res 2021 04 18;200:12-15. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW Health Pathology, Randwick, NSW, Australia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2021.01.004DOI Listing
April 2021

A multicenter laboratory assessment of a new automated chemiluminescent assay for ADAMTS13 activity.

J Thromb Haemost 2021 02 21;19(2):417-428. Epub 2020 Nov 21.

Department of Haematology, Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research (ICPMR), NSW Health Pathology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

Background: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare but potentially fatal disorder caused by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) deficiency. Prompt identification/exclusion of TTP can thus be facilitated by rapid ADAMTS13 testing. The most commonly utilized (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]-based) assay takes several hours to perform and so does not generally permit rapid testing.

Objectives: To evaluate the utility of a new automated test for ADAMTS13 activity, the HemosIL AcuStar ADAMTS13 Activity assay, based on chemiluminescence and able to be performed on an ACL AcuStar instrument within 33 minutes.

Patients/methods: This multicenter (n = 8) assessment included testing of more than 700 test samples, with similar numbers of prospective (n = 348) and retrospective (n = 385) samples. The main comparator was the Technozym ADAMTS13 Activity ELISA. We also assessed comparative performance for detection of ADAMTS13 inhibitors using a Bethesda assay.

Results: Overall, the chemiluminescent assay yielded similar results to the comparator ELISA, albeit with slight negative bias. ADAMTS13 inhibitor detection was also comparable, albeit with slight positive bias with the AcuStar assay. Assay precision was similar with both assays, and we also verified assay normal reference ranges.

Conclusions: The HemosIL AcuStar ADAMTS13 Activity assay provided results rapidly, which were largely comparable with the Technozym ADAMTS13 Activity ELISA assay, albeit lower on average. Conversely, inhibitor levels tended to be identified at a higher level on average. Thus, the HemosIL AcuStar ADAMTS13 Activity assay provides a fast and accurate means to quantitate plasma levels of ADAMTS13 for TTP/ADAMTS13 identification/exclusion, and potentially also for other applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.15157DOI Listing
February 2021

A multicentre assessment of contemporary laboratory assays for heparin induced thrombocytopenia.

Pathology 2021 Feb 5;53(2):247-256. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

NSW Health Pathology, NSW, Australia; Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia.

Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of heparin therapy. In some patients, HIT causes platelet activation and thrombosis (sometimes abbreviated HITT), which leads to adverse clinical sequalae ('pathological HIT'). The likelihood of HIT is initially assessed clinically, typically using a scoring system, of which the 4T score is that most utilised. Subsequent laboratory testing to confirm or exclude HIT facilitates exclusion or diagnosis and management. The current investigation comprises a multicentre (n=9) assessment of contemporary laboratory testing for HIT, as performed over the past 1-3 years in each site and comprising testing of over 1200 samples. The primary laboratory test used by study participants (n=8) comprised a chemiluminescence procedure (HIT-IgG) performed on an AcuStar instrument. Additional immunological testing performed by study sites included lateral flow (STiC, Stago), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Asserachrom (HPIA IgG), PaGIA (BioRad), plus functional assays, primarily serotonin release assay (SRA) or platelet aggregation methods. The chemiluminescence procedure yielded a highly sensitive screening method for identifying functional HIT, given high area under the curve (AUC, generally ≥0.9) in a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis against SRA as gold standard. ELISA testing resulted in lower ROC AUC scores (<0.8) and higher levels of false positives. Although there is clear association with the likelihood of HIT, the 4T score had less utility than literature suggests, and was comparable to a previous study reported by some of the authors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pathol.2020.07.012DOI Listing
February 2021

An integrated approach to inherited platelet disorders: results from a research collaborative, the Sydney Platelet Group.

Pathology 2020 Feb 10;52(2):243-255. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Northern Blood Research Centre, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Department of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Inherited disorders of platelet function (IPFD) and/or number (IPND) are heterogeneous conditions that result in variable mucocutaneous bleeding symptoms as a result of deranged primary haemostasis caused by platelet dysfunction or thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis is important to guide post-operative bleeding prophylactic strategies, to avoid treatment with inappropriate medications, and inform prognosis. Achieving an accurate diagnosis has traditionally been hampered by the requirement of multiple, often complex, laboratory tests that are not always available at single centres. To improve the diagnosis of these disorders a research collaborative was established, the Sydney Platelet Group, that explored an integrated approach combining traditional and contemporary platelet phenotypic and genetic diagnostic platforms available at four Sydney tertiary hospitals. Herein we report the outcomes of the first 50 patients evaluated using this approach. The cohort included 22 individuals with suspected IPFD and 28 with thrombocytopenia. Bleeding scores were higher in individuals with IPFD (mean 5.75; SD 4.83) than those with IPNDs (mean 2.14; SD 2.45). In cases with suspected IPFD, diagnosis to the level of the defective pathway was achieved in 71% and four individuals were found not to have a definitive platelet function defect. Dense granule secretion disorders were the most common platelet pathway abnormality detected (n=5). Mean bleeding scores in these individuals were not significantly different to individuals with defects in other commonly detected platelet pathways (dense granules, signal transduction and 'undetermined'). A molecular diagnosis was achieved in 52% of individuals with IPNDs and 5% with IPFD. Likely pathogenic and pathogenic variants detected included variants associated with extra-haematological complications (DIAPH1, MYH9) and potential for malignancy (ANKRD26 and RUNX1). The level of platelet investigation undertaken by this initiative is currently not available elsewhere in Australia and initial results confirm the utility of this integrated phenotypic-genetic approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pathol.2019.10.005DOI Listing
February 2020

HIT or miss? A comprehensive contemporary investigation of laboratory tests for heparin induced thrombocytopenia.

Pathology 2018 Jun 17;50(4):426-436. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Haematology, Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research (ICPMR), Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia; NSW Health Pathology, NSW, Australia; Sydney Centres for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of heparin therapy, which in a proportion of patients causes platelet activation and thrombosis. Initial clinical assessment of the likelihood of HIT is facilitated by laboratory testing to confirm or exclude HIT. This prospective investigation was performed over an 18-month period, and has involved testing of over 300 test samples from over 100 consecutive patients. Clinical assessment by 4T score was supplemented by laboratory tests that comprised both immunological [lateral flow ('STiC'), chemiluminescence (AcuStar; HIT-IgG), ELISA (Asserachrom HPIA IgG)] and functional assays [SRA, platelet aggregation using whole blood ('Multiplate') and platelet rich plasma ('LTA')]. We observed both false positive and false negative test findings with most assays. Overall, the whole blood aggregation method provided a reasonable alternative to SRA for identifying functional HIT. STiC, AcuStar and ELISA procedures were fairly comparable in terms of screening for HIT, although STiC and AcuStar both yielded false negatives, albeit also resulting in fewer false positives than ELISA. The 4T score had less utility in our patient cohort than we were expecting, although there was an association with the likelihood of HIT. Nevertheless, we accept that our observations are based on limited test numbers. In conclusion, no single approach (clinical or laboratory) was associated with optimal sensitivity or specificity of HIT exclusion or identification, and thus, a combination of clinical evaluation and laboratory testing will best ensure the accuracy of diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pathol.2017.11.089DOI Listing
June 2018