Publications by authors named "David Ramos-Vicente"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

AMPA receptor auxiliary subunits emerged during early vertebrate evolution by neo/subfunctionalization of unrelated proteins.

Open Biol 2020 10 28;10(10):200234. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

Molecular Physiology of the Synapse Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.

In mammalian synapses, the function of ionotropic glutamate receptors is critically modulated by auxiliary subunits. Most of these specifically regulate the synaptic localization and electrophysiological properties of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). Here, we comprehensively investigated the animal evolution of the protein families that contain AMPAR auxiliary subunits (ARASs). We observed that, on average, vertebrates have four times more ARASs than other animal species. We also demonstrated that ARASs belong to four unrelated protein families: CACNG-GSG1, cornichon, shisa and Dispanin C. Our study demonstrates that, despite the ancient origin of these four protein families, the majority of ARASs emerged during vertebrate evolution by independent but convergent processes of neo/subfunctionalization that resulted in the multiple ARASs found in present vertebrate genomes. Importantly, although AMPARs appeared and diversified in the ancestor of bilateral animals, the ARAS expansion did not occur until much later, in early vertebrate evolution. We propose that the surge in ARASs and consequent increase in AMPAR functionalities, contributed to the increased complexity of vertebrate brains and cognitive functions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsob.200234DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7653359PMC
October 2020

L-Serine dietary supplementation is associated with clinical improvement of loss-of-function -related pediatric encephalopathy.

Sci Signal 2019 06 18;12(586). Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL)-Unit of Neuropharmacology and Pain, University of Barcelona, Barcelona 08908, Spain.

Autosomal dominant mutations in are associated with severe encephalopathy, but little is known about the pathophysiological outcomes and any potential therapeutic interventions. Genetic studies have described the association between de novo mutations of genes encoding the subunits of the -methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and severe neurological conditions. Here, we evaluated a missense mutation in , causing a proline-to-threonine switch (P553T) in the GluN2B subunit of NMDAR, which was found in a 5-year-old patient with Rett-like syndrome with severe encephalopathy. Structural molecular modeling predicted a reduced pore size of the mutant GluN2B-containing NMDARs. Electrophysiological recordings in a HEK-293T cell line expressing the mutated subunit confirmed this prediction and showed an associated reduced glutamate affinity. Moreover, GluN2B(P553T)-expressing primary murine hippocampal neurons showed decreased spine density, concomitant with reduced NMDA-evoked currents and impaired NMDAR-dependent insertion of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 at stimulated synapses. Furthermore, the naturally occurring coagonist d-serine restored function to GluN2B(P553T)-containing NMDARs. l-Serine dietary supplementation of the patient was hence initiated, resulting in the increased abundance of d-serine in the plasma and brain. The patient has shown notable improvements in motor and cognitive performance and communication after 11 and 17 months of l-serine dietary supplementation. Our data suggest that l-serine supplementation might ameliorate -related severe encephalopathy and other neurological conditions caused by glutamatergic signaling deficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.aaw0936DOI Listing
June 2019

Metazoan evolution of glutamate receptors reveals unreported phylogenetic groups and divergent lineage-specific events.

Elife 2018 11 22;7. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Molecular Physiology of the Synapse Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.

Glutamate receptors are divided in two unrelated families: ionotropic (iGluR), driving synaptic transmission, and metabotropic (mGluR), which modulate synaptic strength. The present classification of GluRs is based on vertebrate proteins and has remained unchanged for over two decades. Here we report an exhaustive phylogenetic study of GluRs in metazoans. Importantly, we demonstrate that GluRs have followed different evolutionary histories in separated animal lineages. Our analysis reveals that the present organization of iGluRs into six classes does not capture the full complexity of their evolution. Instead, we propose an organization into four subfamilies and ten classes, four of which have never been previously described. Furthermore, we report a sister class to mGluR classes I-III, class IV. We show that many unreported proteins are expressed in the nervous system, and that new Epsilon receptors form functional ligand-gated ion channels. We propose an updated classification of glutamate receptors that includes our findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.35774DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6307864PMC
November 2018

Characterization of the TLR Family in and Discovery of a Novel TLR22-Like Involved in dsRNA Recognition in Amphioxus.

Front Immunol 2018 2;9:2525. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

Department of Cell Biology, Animal Physiology and Immunology, Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain.

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important for raising innate immune responses in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Amphioxus belongs to an ancient chordate lineage which shares key features with vertebrates. The genomic research on TLR genes in and reveals the expansion of TLRs in amphioxus. However, the repertoire of TLRs in has not been studied and the functionality of amphioxus TLRs has not been reported. We have identified from transcriptomic data 30 new putative TLRs in and all of them are transcribed in adult amphioxus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the repertoire of TLRs consists of both non-vertebrate and vertebrate-like TLRs. It also indicated a lineage-specific expansion in orthologous clusters of the vertebrate TLR11 family. We did not detect any representatives of the vertebrate TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR7 families. To gain insight into these TLRs, we studied in depth a particular TLR highly similar to a gene annotated as bbtTLR1. The phylogenetic analysis of this novel BlTLR showed that it clusters with the vertebrate TLR11 family and it might be more related to TLR13 subfamily according to similar domain architecture. Transient and stable expression in HEK293 cells showed that the BlTLR localizes on the plasma membrane, but it did not respond to the most common mammalian TLR ligands. However, when the ectodomain of BlTLR is fused to the TIR domain of human TLR2, the chimeric protein could indeed induce NF-κB transactivation in response to the viral ligand Poly I:C, also indicating that in amphioxus, specific accessory proteins are needed for downstream activation. Based on the phylogenetic, subcellular localization and functional analysis, we propose that the novel BlTLR might be classified as an antiviral receptor sharing at least partly the functions performed by vertebrate TLR22. TLR22 is thought to be viral teleost-specific TLR but here we demonstrate that teleosts and amphioxus TLR22-like probably shared a common ancestor. Additional functional studies with other lancelet TLR genes will enrich our understanding of the immune response in amphioxus and will provide a unique perspective on the evolution of the immune system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.02525DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6224433PMC
October 2019

Rett-like Severe Encephalopathy Caused by a De Novo GRIN2B Mutation Is Attenuated by D-serine Dietary Supplement.

Biol Psychiatry 2018 Jan 16;83(2):160-172. Epub 2017 Jun 16.

Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute-Unit of Neuropharmacology and Pain Group, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

Background: N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play pivotal roles in synaptic development, plasticity, neural survival, and cognition. Despite recent reports describing the genetic association between de novo mutations of NMDAR subunits and severe psychiatric diseases, little is known about their pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutic interventions. Here we report a case study of a 4-year-old Rett-like patient with severe encephalopathy carrying a missense de novo mutation in GRIN2B(p.P553T) coding for the GluN2B subunit of NMDAR.

Methods: We generated a dynamic molecular model of mutant GluN2B-containing NMDARs. We expressed the mutation in cell lines and primary cultures, and we evaluated the putative morphological, electrophysiological, and synaptic plasticity alterations. Finally, we evaluated D-serine administration as a therapeutic strategy and translated it to the clinical practice.

Results: Structural molecular modeling predicted a reduced pore size of mutant NMDARs. Electrophysiological recordings confirmed this prediction and also showed gating alterations, a reduced glutamate affinity associated with a strong decrease of NMDA-evoked currents. Moreover, GluN2B(P553T)-expressing neurons showed decreased spine density, concomitant with reduced NMDA-evoked currents and impaired NMDAR-dependent insertion of GluA1 at stimulated synapses. Notably, the naturally occurring coagonist D-serine was able to attenuate hypofunction of GluN2B(p.P553T)-containing NMDARs. Hence, D-serine dietary supplementation was initiated. Importantly, the patient has shown remarkable motor, cognitive, and communication improvements after 17 months of D-serine dietary supplementation.

Conclusions: Our data suggest that hypofunctional NMDARs containing GluN2B(p.P553T) can contribute to Rett-like encephalopathy and that their potentiation by D-serine treatment may underlie the associated clinical improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.05.028DOI Listing
January 2018