Publications by authors named "David Perea"

3 Publications

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Peripheral and lung resident memory T cell responses against SARS-CoV-2.

Nat Commun 2021 05 21;12(1):3010. Epub 2021 May 21.

Infectious Diseases Department, Vall d'Hebron Institut de Recerca (VHIR), Vall d'Hebron Hospital Universitari, Vall d'Hebron Barcelona Hospital Campus, Barcelona, Spain.

Resident memory T cells (T) positioned within the respiratory tract are probably required to limit SARS-CoV-2 spread and COVID-19. Importantly, T are mostly non-recirculating, which reduces the window of opportunity to examine these cells in the blood as they move to the lung parenchyma. Here, we identify circulating virus-specific T cell responses during acute infection with functional, migratory and apoptotic patterns modulated by viral proteins and associated with clinical outcome. Disease severity is associated predominantly with IFNγ and IL-4 responses, increased responses against S peptides and apoptosis, whereas non-hospitalized patients have increased IL-12p70 levels, degranulation in response to N peptides and SARS-CoV-2-specific CCR7 T cells secreting IL-10. In convalescent patients, lung-T are frequently detected even 10 months after initial infection, in which contemporaneous blood does not reflect tissue-resident profiles. Our study highlights a balanced anti-inflammatory antiviral response associated with a better outcome and persisting T cells as important for future protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-23333-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8140108PMC
May 2021

Transfer of median and ulnar nerve fascicles for lesions of the posterior cord in infraclavicular brachial plexus injury: report of 2 cases.

J Hand Surg Am 2012 Oct;37(10):1986-9

Upper Limb Unit, Orthopedic Department, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain.

In infraclavicular lesions of brachial plexus, severe lesions of the posterior cord often occur when medial and lateral cord function is preserved to a greater or lesser extent. In these cases, shoulder function may be preserved by activity of the muscles innervated by the suprascapular nerve, but complete paralysis exists in the deltoid, triceps, and brachioradialis, and all wrist and finger extensors. Classical reconstruction procedures consist of nerve grafts, but their results in adults are disappointing. We report an approach transferring: (1) an ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of the long portion of the triceps brachii muscle, (2) a median nerve branch from the pronator teres to the motor branch of the extensor carpi radialis longus, and (3) a median nerve branch from the flexor carpi radialis to the posterior interosseous nerve. We describe the procedure and report 2 clinical cases showing the effectiveness of this technique for restoring extension of the elbow, wrist, and fingers in the common infraclavicular lesions of the brachial plexus affecting the posterior cord.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2012.06.016DOI Listing
October 2012

Transfer of the nerve to the brachioradialis muscle to the anterior interosseous nerve for treatment for lower brachial plexus lesions: case report.

J Hand Surg Am 2011 Mar;36(3):394-7

Upper Limb Unit, Orthopaedic Department, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Spain.

In lower lesions of the brachial plexus (C8-T1) there is good function of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist, although that of the hand is impaired. Reconstruction of finger flexion is generally obtained by tendon transfer. We present a case report involving transfer of the motor nerve branch of the brachioradialis muscle to the anterior interosseous nerve to restore finger flexion in acute lower brachial plexus lesion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2010.11.030DOI Listing
March 2011
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