Publications by authors named "David Denney"

9 Publications

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Physical activity status and quality of life in patients with epilepsy - Survey from level four epilepsy monitoring units.

Epilepsy Res 2021 Jul 9;173:106639. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, TX, 75390, USA. Electronic address:

Purpose: People with epilepsy (PWE) tend to have sedentary lifestyles which may predispose them to a lower perceived quality of life (QOL). Moreover, the relationship between physical activity (PA) and QOL in populations of PWE with high disease burden has been under-studied. The goal of this study was to evaluate PA level and its impact on health-related QOL in PWE who were admitted to Level-4 epilepsy monitoring units (EMU).

Methods: In this prospective observational study, 200 patients from two EMUs in Dallas, Texas completed the following standard surveys: Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity (RAPA), the Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-31), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) questionnaire. Information on self-reported epilepsy history, severity of disease, and socioeconomic status were also collected. The diagnosis of epilepsy was confirmed by video-EEG monitoring.

Results: Among the 200 who completed the survey, 113 had a diagnosis of epilepsy and 109 of them completed the RAPA. Ninety-two (84 %) of these PWE reported a sedentary level of physical activity (RAPA < 6) and 16 % reported an active level (RAPA ≥ 6). Self-reported QOL was slightly higher in PWE with an active level of PA compared to PWE with a sedentary level of PA (63.8 ± 15.0 vs 53.7 ± 17.9, p = 0.07), even though there was no difference in the severity of self-reported mood symptoms. After controlling for employment and seizure frequency, physical activity level measured by RAPA score was also positively related to QOL (r = 0.39, p = 0.01) and negatively correlated with anxiety symptoms (r = -0.28, p = 0.02) and depression symptoms (r = -0.25, p = 0.04).

Conclusion: The majority of PWE in this survey reported sedentary lifestyles despite most of them being young to middle-aged adults. Higher PA level was associated with fewer self-reported mood symptoms and higher QOL. In conjunction with the literature, these results suggest that PWE with a wide range of disease burden should be encouraged to participate in regular exercise to potentially improve QOL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2021.106639DOI Listing
July 2021

Perceptions of the effectiveness of health care for probationers.

Int J Prison Health 2020 04;16(2):123-134

Department of Criminology and Sociology, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, UK.

Purpose: This study aims to investigate the views of commissioners, providers and criminal justice staff on how effective current health-care provision is at meeting the health needs of people on probation. Understanding perceptions of what constitutes effective provision, where barriers are encountered and where improvements could be made is an important step towards improving access to care for this hard-to-reach group.

Design/methodology/approach: The research was part of a wider study. This paper focusses on findings from case studies conducted via semi-structured telephone interviews with 24 stakeholders in a purposive sample from six geographical areas of England. Interviews were conducted by researchers from a variety of backgrounds and an individual with lived experience of the criminal justice system. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings: Participants provided examples of effective health-care provision, which largely involved multi-agency partnership working. It was apparent that there are many barriers to providing appropriate health-care provision to people on probation, which are underpinned by the complexity of this population's health-care needs, the complexity of the health-care landscape and problematic commissioning processes.

Practical Implications: Improvements are needed to provide appropriate and accessible health care that meets the needs of people on probation, thereby reducing health inequalities. These include shared targets, improved funding, clearer pathways into care and giving probation a voice in commissioning.

Originality/value: To the best of authors' knowledge, this is the first study of commissioner, provider and criminal justice staffs' views on the effectiveness of current health-care provision at meeting the health needs of people on probation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJPH-01-2020-0004DOI Listing
April 2020

Comparison of psychiatric comorbidities and impact on quality of life in patients with epilepsy or psychogenic nonepileptic spells.

Epilepsy Behav 2020 01 20;102:106649. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, TX 75390, USA. Electronic address:

Objectives: Psychiatric comorbidity is common in people with epilepsy (PWE) and psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNES). These comorbidities can be detrimental to quality of life (QOL) and are often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Some types of epilepsy, such as focal temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), have been associated with higher rates of psychiatric comorbidity. This study examined the impact of psychiatric comorbidity on QOL in patients admitted to two level 4 epilepsy monitoring units (EMUs).

Methods: In this prospective observational study, 200 patients admitted to two level 4 EMUs completed standardized surveys including the Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-31-P), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Hierarchal multiple regression was performed to assess impact on QOL.

Results: Of the 200 participants, 113 had a diagnosis of epilepsy, 36 had a diagnosis of PNES, and 51 were excluded for nondiagnostic evaluation or dual diagnosis. Of those with epilepsy, 65 had TLE, 28 had focal extratemporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE), and 20 had nonfocal epilepsy. Patients with PNES had higher self-reported anxiety and depression levels (GAD-7: p = 0.04, PHQ-9: p < 0.01; BDI-II: p < 0.01) but similar QOL to PWE (p = 0.78). Using hierarchal multiple regression, symptoms of anxiety and depression were significant predictors of lower QOL in PWE but not in patients with PNES. There was no difference in QOL in those with ETLE and TLE.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that self-reported anxiety and depression symptoms are common in patients admitted to level 4 EMUs regardless of diagnosis and play an important role in predicting QOL in PWE. Our findings emphasize the importance of routinely screening all EMU patients for psychiatric comorbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.106649DOI Listing
January 2020

NHS commissioning in probation in England - Still on a wing and a prayer.

Health Soc Care Community 2019 09 17;27(5):e697-e704. Epub 2019 Jun 17.

School of Law, Royal Holloway, Egham, UK.

Policy reforms in England and Wales mean that all individuals released from prison will have some contact with probation services, either serving a community sentence, or being on licence post-release. Despite often having complex health needs, including a higher prevalence of mental health problems, substance misuse problems and physical health problems than the general population, this socially excluded group of people often do not access healthcare until crisis point. This is partly due to service-level barriers such as a lack of appropriate and accessible healthcare provision. We conducted a national survey of all Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs, n = 210) and Mental Health Trusts (MHTs, n = 56) in England to systematically map healthcare provision for this group. We compared findings with similar surveys conducted in 2013 and 2014. We had excellent response rates, with the data analysed here representing responses from 75% of CCGs and 52% of MHTs in England. We found that just 4.5% (n = 7) of CCG responses described commissioning a service specifically for probation service clients, and 7.6% (n = 12) described probation-specific elements within their mainstream service provision. Responses from 19.7% of CCGs providing data (n = 31) incorrectly suggested that NHS England are responsible for commissioning healthcare for probation clients rather than CCGs. Responses from 69% (n = 20) of MHTs described providing services specifically for probation service clients, and 17.2% (n = 5) described probation-specific elements within their mainstream service provision. This points to a need for an overarching health and justice strategy that emphasises organisational responsibilities in relation to commissioning healthcare for people in contact with probation services to ensure that there is appropriate healthcare provision for this group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12789DOI Listing
September 2019

Subjective ratings of cognitive and emotional functioning in patients with mild cognitive impairment and patients with subjective memory complaints but normal cognitive functioning.

J Clin Exp Neuropsychol 2019 08 8;41(6):565-575. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

b Department of Clinical Neuropsychology , Barrow Neurological Institute , Phoenix , AZ , USA.

In a retrospective chart review, 39 patients referred for a clinical neuropsychological examination were identified as showing either mild cognitive impairment of the amnestic type (MCI-A;  = 21) or subjective memory complaints but with normal memory function (SMC;  = 18). During the clinical interview, patients and informants were routinely asked to make subjective ratings regarding the patient's cognitive and affective functioning in everyday life. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these two patient groups (and their informants) significantly differed in their subjective reports about level of cognitive and affective difficulties. It was predicted that SMC patients would report higher levels of cognitive and emotional dysfunction than MCI-A patients. It was further predicted that MCI-A patients would underreport cognitive difficulties (compared to informant reports); SMC patients would demonstrate the opposite pattern. Results supported these predictions and suggest that routine assessment of subjective experiences of patients in conjunction with informant ratings may aid clinical diagnosis, particularly when the primary complaint is a decline in memory.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13803395.2019.1588229DOI Listing
August 2019

Self-Reported Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Cognitive Impairment: Increased Risk and Earlier Age of Diagnosis.

J Alzheimers Dis 2016 ;51(3):727-36

Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

This study examined whether history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with increased risk and earlier onset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Subjects with MCI (n = 3,187) and normal cognition (n = 3,244) were obtained from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database. TBI was categorized based on lifetime reported TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) without chronic deficit. Logistic regression was used to examine TBI history as a predictor of MCI, adjusted for demographics, apolipoprotein E-ɛ4 (ApoE4), a composite vascular risk score, and history of psychiatric factors. ANCOVA was used to examine whether age at MCI diagnosis and estimated age of onset differed between those with (TBI+) and without (TBI-) a history of TBI. TBI history was a significant predictor (p <  0.01) and associated with increased odds of MCI diagnosis in unadjusted (OR = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.05-1.49) and adjusted models, accounting for age, education, ApoE4, and a composite vascular score (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.10-1.58). This association, however, was largely attenuated (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 0.94-1.37; p = 0.18) after adjustment for reported history of depression. MCI was diagnosed a mean of 2.3 years earlier (p <  0.001) in the TBI+ group, and although TBI+ subjects had an estimated mean of decline 1.7 years earlier, clinician-estimated age of onset failed to differ (p = 0.13) when gender and psychiatric factors were controlled. This is the first report of a possible role for TBI as a risk factor in MCI, but its association may be related to other factors such as gender and depression and requires further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-150895DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4853649PMC
December 2016

NHS commissioning in probation in England - on a wing and a prayer.

Health Soc Care Community 2017 01 1;25(1):137-144. Epub 2015 Oct 1.

School of Law, Royal Holloway, University of London, Surrey, UK.

National guidance in England exhorts Clinical Commissioning Groups [groups of general practices established to organise delivery of National Health Service (NHS) care in their local area (CCGs)] to commission healthcare for those living in the community who are serving non-custodial sentences called 'community orders'. This includes 'approved premises' - accommodation providing enhanced supervision for offenders and individuals on bail who may present a high risk of harm to the public. In this national survey of CCGs in England, we compared the extent to which healthcare services were commissioned for probationers in 2014 with similar data we collected in 2013. A freedom of information (FOI) request was sent to all CCGs (n = 212) and Mental Health Trusts (organisations commissioned to provide health and social care services to individuals with mental health disorders) (n = 53) in England. Mental Health Trusts were included as they were known to fund mental health services for probation as part of their block funding allocations. A small number of basic questions were asked. The response rate was good with 65% of CCGs (n = 137) and 68% (n = 36) of Mental Health Trusts responding. The findings show that the proportion of CCGs commissioning healthcare for probation reduced from 7% to 1%, with 20% of CCGs stating that funding healthcare for this group was the responsibility of the NHS England Area Teams. There was also a reduction in the proportion of Mental Health Trusts funding healthcare for probation but from a much higher baseline, that is from 70% to 61%. The prevalence of mental health disorders in probation is high, so it was of concern that only 12% of Mental Health Trusts provided a service to support approved premises and just 32% provided clinics in probation. The results are discussed within the context of the NHS reforms and the government's plans in England to reform probation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12283DOI Listing
January 2017

Dyadic Short Forms of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV.

Arch Clin Neuropsychol 2015 Aug 8;30(5):404-12. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA

Full Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) administration can be time-consuming and may not be necessary when intelligence quotient estimates will suffice. Estimated Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) and General Ability Index (GAI) scores were derived from nine dyadic short forms using individual regression equations based on data from a clinical sample (n = 113) that was then cross validated in a separate clinical sample (n = 50). Derived scores accounted for 70%-83% of the variance in FSIQ and 77%-88% of the variance in GAI. Predicted FSIQs were strongly associated with actual FSIQ (rs = .73-.88), as were predicted and actual GAIs (rs = .80-.93). Each of the nine dyadic short forms of the WAIS-IV was a good predictor of FSIQ and GAI in the validation sample. These data support the validity of WAIS-IV short forms when time is limited or lengthier batteries cannot be tolerated by patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/arclin/acv035DOI Listing
August 2015

Dyadic Short Forms of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV.

Arch Clin Neuropsychol 2015 Aug 8;30(5):404-12. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA

Full Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) administration can be time-consuming and may not be necessary when intelligence quotient estimates will suffice. Estimated Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) and General Ability Index (GAI) scores were derived from nine dyadic short forms using individual regression equations based on data from a clinical sample (n = 113) that was then cross validated in a separate clinical sample (n = 50). Derived scores accounted for 70%-83% of the variance in FSIQ and 77%-88% of the variance in GAI. Predicted FSIQs were strongly associated with actual FSIQ (rs = .73-.88), as were predicted and actual GAIs (rs = .80-.93). Each of the nine dyadic short forms of the WAIS-IV was a good predictor of FSIQ and GAI in the validation sample. These data support the validity of WAIS-IV short forms when time is limited or lengthier batteries cannot be tolerated by patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/arclin/acv035DOI Listing
August 2015