Publications by authors named "Daryl A Scott"

91 Publications

COPB2 loss of function causes a coatopathy with osteoporosis and developmental delay.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 09 26;108(9):1710-1724. Epub 2021 Aug 26.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Coatomer complexes function in the sorting and trafficking of proteins between subcellular organelles. Pathogenic variants in coatomer subunits or associated factors have been reported in multi-systemic disorders, i.e., coatopathies, that can affect the skeletal and central nervous systems. We have identified loss-of-function variants in COPB2, a component of the coatomer complex I (COPI), in individuals presenting with osteoporosis, fractures, and developmental delay of variable severity. Electron microscopy of COPB2-deficient subjects' fibroblasts showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with granular material, prominent rough ER, and vacuoles, consistent with an intracellular trafficking defect. We studied the effect of COPB2 deficiency on collagen trafficking because of the critical role of collagen secretion in bone biology. COPB2 siRNA-treated fibroblasts showed delayed collagen secretion with retention of type I collagen in the ER and Golgi and altered distribution of Golgi markers. copb2-null zebrafish embryos showed retention of type II collagen, disorganization of the ER and Golgi, and early larval lethality. Copb2 mice exhibited low bone mass, and consistent with the findings in human cells and zebrafish, studies in Copb2 mouse fibroblasts suggest ER stress and a Golgi defect. Interestingly, ascorbic acid treatment partially rescued the zebrafish developmental phenotype and the cellular phenotype in Copb2 mouse fibroblasts. This work identifies a form of coatopathy due to COPB2 haploinsufficiency, explores a potential therapeutic approach for this disorder, and highlights the role of the COPI complex as a regulator of skeletal homeostasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.08.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8456174PMC
September 2021

The frequency and efficacy of genetic testing in individuals with scimitar syndrome.

Cardiol Young 2021 Jul 2:1-8. Epub 2021 Jul 2.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

Background: Scimitar syndrome is a rare CHD composed of partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection from the right lung, via a scimitar vein, to the inferior vena cava rather than the left atrium. Genetic conditions associated with scimitar syndrome have not been well investigated at present.

Methods: Our study included patients with scimitar syndrome diagnosed at Texas Children's Hospital from January 1987 to July 2020. Medical records were evaluated to determine if genetic testing was performed, including chromosomal microarray analysis or whole-exome sequencing. Copy number variants identified as pathogenic/likely pathogenic and variants of unknown significance were collected. Analyses of cardiac and extracardiac findings were performed via chart review.

Results: Ninety-eight patients were identified with scimitar syndrome, 89 of which met inclusion criteria. A chromosome analysis or chromosomal microarray analysis was performed in 18 patients (20%). Whole-exome sequencing was performed in six patients following negative chromosomal microarray analysis testing. A molecular genetic diagnosis was made in 7 of 18 cases (39% of those tested). Ninety-six per cent of the cohort had some type of extracardiac finding, with 43% having asthma and 20% having a gastrointestinal pathology. Of the seven patients with positive genetic testing, all had extracardiac anomalies with all but one having gastrointestinal findings and 30% having congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

Conclusions: Genetic testing revealed an underlying diagnosis in roughly 40% of those tested. Given the relatively high prevalence of pathogenic variants, we recommend chromosomal microarray analysis and whole-exome sequencing for patients with scimitar syndrome and extracardiac defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1047951121002535DOI Listing
July 2021

Birth defect co-occurrence patterns in the Texas Birth Defects Registry.

Pediatr Res 2021 Jun 30. Epub 2021 Jun 30.

Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, UTHealth School of Public Health, Houston, TX, USA.

Background: The population-level landscape of co-occurring birth defects among infants without a syndromic diagnosis is not well understood.

Methods: We analyzed data from 40,771 infants with two or more major birth defects in the Texas Birth Defects Registry (TBDR; 1999-2014). We calculated adjusted observed-to-expected (O/E) ratios for all two, three, four, and five-way combinations of 138 major defects.

Results: Among 530 patterns with the highest adjusted O/E ratios (top 5% of 10,595 patterns), 66% included only defects co-occurring within one organ system and 28% were suggestive of known patterns (e.g., midline developmental defects). Of the remaining patterns, the combination of defects with the highest O/E ratio (193.8) encompassed the diaphragm, spine, spleen, and heart defects. Fourteen patterns involved heart and spine defects with or without rib defects. Ten additional patterns primarily involved two hallmark components of VACTERL association (specifically, vertebral defects, anal atresia, cardiac defects, renal, or limb defects, but not tracheoesophageal fistula).

Conclusions: Our analyses provide a description of the birth defect co-occurrence patterns in a multi-ethnic, population-based sample, and revealed several patterns of interest. This work complements prior work that has suggested etiologic connections between select defects (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia and heart and spleen anomalies; heart and spine defects).

Impact: In this large-scale, population-based study of birth defect co-occurrence patterns, we found several birth defect combinations of potential interest that warrant further investigation: congenital diaphragmatic hernia, heart, spine, and spleen defects and scimitar syndrome with vertebral defects. The majority of patterns of co-occurring defects observed more frequently than expected involved multiple defects within the same system and combinations suggestive of known associations. Nearly all of the top patterns (beyond the same system and those suggestive of known associations) involved organ systems that are components of the VACTERL association, with heart, spine, and rib defect patterns being the most common.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41390-021-01629-wDOI Listing
June 2021

Birth Defect Co-Occurrence Patterns Among Infants With Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2021 Apr 28:10556656211010060. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, UTHealth School of Public Health, Houston, TX, USA.

Objective: To investigate 2- to 5-way patterns of defects co-occurring with orofacial clefts using data from a population-based registry.

Design: We used data from the Texas Birth Defects Registry for deliveries between 1999 and 2014 to Texas residents, including 1884 cases with cleft palate (CP) and 5289 cases with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL±P) without a known syndrome. We identified patterns of defects co-occurring with CP and with CL±P observed more frequently than would be expected if these defects occurred independently. We calculated adjusted observed-to-expected (/) ratios to account for the known tendency of birth defects to cluster nonspecifically.

Results: Among infants without a syndrome, 23% with CP and 21% with CL±P had at least 1 additional congenital anomaly. Several combinations of defects were observed much more often than expected. For example, the combination of CL±P, congenital hydrocephaly, anophthalmia, and other nose anomalies had an / ratio of 605. For both CP and CL±P, co-occurrence patterns with the highest / ratios involved craniofacial and brain abnormalities, and many included the skeletal, cardiovascular, and renal systems.

Conclusions: The patterns of defects we observed co-occurring with clefts more often than expected may help improve our understanding of the relationships between multiple defects. Further work to better understand some of the top defect combinations could reveal new phenotypic subgroups and increase our knowledge of the developmental mechanisms that underlie the respective defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10556656211010060DOI Listing
April 2021

RERE deficiency contributes to the development of orofacial clefts in humans and mice.

Hum Mol Genet 2021 May;30(7):595-602

Department of Molecular & Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Deletions of chromosome 1p36 are the most common telomeric deletions in humans and are associated with an increased risk of orofacial clefting. Deletion/phenotype mapping, combined with data from human and mouse studies, suggests the existence of multiple 1p36 genes associated with orofacial clefting including SKI, PRDM16, PAX7 and GRHL3. The arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide (RE) repeats gene (RERE) is located in the proximal critical region for 1p36 deletion syndrome and encodes a nuclear receptor co-regulator. Pathogenic RERE variants have been shown to cause neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye or heart (NEDBEH). Cleft lip has previously been described in one individual with NEDBEH. Here we report the first individual with NEDBEH to have a cleft palate. We confirm that RERE is broadly expressed in the palate during mouse embryonic development, and we demonstrate that the majority of RERE-deficient mouse embryos on C57BL/6 background have cleft palate. We go on to show that ablation of Rere in cranial neural crest (CNC) cells, mediated by a Wnt1-Cre, leads to delayed elevation of the palatal shelves and cleft palate and that proliferation of mesenchymal cells in the palatal shelves is significantly reduced in Rereflox/flox; Wnt1-Cre embryos. We conclude that loss of RERE function contributes to the development of orofacial clefts in individuals with proximal 1p36 deletions and NEDBEH and that RERE expression in CNC cells and their derivatives is required for normal palatal development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddab084DOI Listing
May 2021

Patterns of congenital anomalies among individuals with trisomy 13 in Texas.

Am J Med Genet A 2021 06 22;185(6):1787-1793. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, UTHealth School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, USA.

Few population-based studies have analyzed patterns of co-occurring birth defects among those with trisomy 13. We evaluated the frequency of all possible combinations of any one, two, three, or four additional co-occurring birth defects among 736 individuals with trisomy 13 using data from the Texas Birth Defects Registry for deliveries during 1999-2014. We calculated the observed-to-expected ratio for each combination, adjusting for the known tendency for birth defects to cluster non-specifically. To address potential ascertainment differences among live births and non-live births, we repeated analyses specifically among live births. The combination of defects with the largest observed-to-expected ratio was microcephalus, reduction deformities of brain (e.g., holoprosencephaly), anomalies of nose, and polydactyly. As expected, most of the highest 30 observed-to-expected ratios involved combinations with documented features of trisomy 13, including defects of the scalp (e.g., aplasia cutis) and heart. Results were similar among sensitivity analyses restricted to live births. Our findings may help further delineate the phenotypic spectrum for trisomy 13 and may inform future research related to improving screening and counseling for the condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.62175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8193718PMC
June 2021

Variants Associated With X-Linked Intellectual Disability and Congenital Malformation.

Front Cell Dev Biol 2021 3;9:631428. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Department of Human Genetics, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.

Background: X-linked intellectual disability (XLID), which occurs predominantly in males, is a relatively common and genetically heterogeneous disorder in which over 100 mutated genes have been reported. The gene at Xp11.23 encodes ovarian tumor deubiquitinase 5 protein, which is a deubiquitinating enzyme member of the ovarian tumor family. LINKage-specific-deubiquitylation-deficiency-induced embryonic defects (LINKED) syndrome, arising from pathogenic variants, was recently reported as a new XLID with additional congenital anomalies.

Methods: We investigated three affected males (49- and 47-year-old brothers [Individuals 1 and 2] and a 2-year-old boy [Individual 3]) from two families who showed developmental delay. Their common clinical features included developmental delay, hypotonia, short stature, and distinctive facial features, such as telecanthus and a depressed nasal bridge. Individuals 1 and 2 showed epilepsy and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a thin corpus callosum and mild ventriculomegaly. Individual 3 showed congenital malformations, including tetralogy of Fallot, hypospadias, and bilateral cryptorchidism. To identify the genetic cause of these features, we performed whole-exome sequencing.

Results: A hemizygous missense variant, c.878A>T, p.Asn293Ile [NM_017602.4], was identified in one family with Individuals 1 and 2, and another missense variant, c.1210 C>T, p.Arg404Trp, in the other family with Individual 3, respectively. The former variant has not been registered in public databases and was predicted to be pathogenic by multiple prediction tools. The latter variant p.Arg404Trp was previously reported as a pathogenic variant, and Individual 3 showed a typical LINKED syndrome phenotype. However, Individuals 1 and 2, with the novel variant (p.Asn293Ile), showed no cardiac or genitourinary malformations.

Conclusions: Unlike previous reports of LINKED syndrome, which described early lethality with congenital cardiac anomalies, our three cases are still alive. Notably, the adult brothers with the novel missense variant have lived into their forties. This may be indicative of a milder phenotype as a possible genotype-phenotype correlation. These findings imply a possible long-term prognosis for individuals with this new XLID syndrome, and a wider phenotypic variation than initially thought.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2021.631428DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7965969PMC
March 2021

RERE deficiency causes retinal and optic nerve atrophy through degeneration of retinal cells.

Dev Dyn 2021 Oct 29;250(10):1398-1409. Epub 2021 Mar 29.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

Background: The arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats gene (RERE) encodes a nuclear receptor coregulator that modulates gene expression through its interaction with transcriptional machinery. In humans, RERE deficiency causes neurodevelopmental disorder with or without structural defects of the brain, eye, heart, and kidney (NEDBEH). Ophthalmological defects are seen in approximately one third of individuals with NEDBEH and in RERE-deficient mice which can serve as a useful animal model.

Results: In mice, RERE is expressed in a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), the lens epithelium, and the ciliary body during the embryonic period. RERE expression expands into the outer nuclear layer and the inner nuclear layer during the postnatal period. RERE-deficient mice have retinal and optic nerve atrophy. We show that RERE deficiency causes progressive loss of retinal cells and apoptosis of retinal cells in the ganglion cell layer as early as E17.5. The number of RGCs is also reduced in RERE-deficient embryos and mice.

Conclusions: We conclude that RERE is required to control the apoptosis of retinal cells in the developing retina, and that RERE deficiency results in the retina atrophy through degeneration of the retinal cells and optic nerve atrophy through the loss of RGCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dvdy.330DOI Listing
October 2021

SPEN haploinsufficiency causes a neurodevelopmental disorder overlapping proximal 1p36 deletion syndrome with an episignature of X chromosomes in females.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 03 16;108(3):502-516. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA.

Deletion 1p36 (del1p36) syndrome is the most common human disorder resulting from a terminal autosomal deletion. This condition is molecularly and clinically heterogeneous. Deletions involving two non-overlapping regions, known as the distal (telomeric) and proximal (centromeric) critical regions, are sufficient to cause the majority of the recurrent clinical features, although with different facial features and dysmorphisms. SPEN encodes a transcriptional repressor commonly deleted in proximal del1p36 syndrome and is located centromeric to the proximal 1p36 critical region. Here, we used clinical data from 34 individuals with truncating variants in SPEN to define a neurodevelopmental disorder presenting with features that overlap considerably with those of proximal del1p36 syndrome. The clinical profile of this disease includes developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, aggressive behavior, attention deficit disorder, hypotonia, brain and spine anomalies, congenital heart defects, high/narrow palate, facial dysmorphisms, and obesity/increased BMI, especially in females. SPEN also emerges as a relevant gene for del1p36 syndrome by co-expression analyses. Finally, we show that haploinsufficiency of SPEN is associated with a distinctive DNA methylation episignature of the X chromosome in affected females, providing further evidence of a specific contribution of the protein to the epigenetic control of this chromosome, and a paradigm of an X chromosome-specific episignature that classifies syndromic traits. We conclude that SPEN is required for multiple developmental processes and SPEN haploinsufficiency is a major contributor to a disorder associated with deletions centromeric to the previously established 1p36 critical regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008487PMC
March 2021

Clinical exome sequencing data reveal high diagnostic yields for congenital diaphragmatic hernia plus (CDH+) and new phenotypic expansions involving CDH.

J Med Genet 2021 Jan 18. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA

Background: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a life-threatening birth defect that often co-occurs with non-hernia-related anomalies (CDH+). While copy number variant (CNV) analysis is often employed as a diagnostic test for CDH+, clinical exome sequencing (ES) has not been universally adopted.

Methods: We analysed a clinical database of ~12 000 test results to determine the diagnostic yields of ES in CDH+ and to identify new phenotypic expansions.

Results: Among the 76 cases with an indication of CDH+, a molecular diagnosis was made in 28 cases for a diagnostic yield of 37% (28/76). A provisional diagnosis was made in seven other cases (9%; 7/76). Four individuals had a diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome caused by frameshift variants in . Putatively deleterious variants in and were each found in two individuals, supporting their role in CDH development. We also identified individuals with de novo pathogenic variants in and , and compound heterozygous pathogenic variants in . The role of these genes in CDH development is supported by the expression of their mouse homologs in the developing diaphragm, their high CDH-specific pathogenicity scores generated using a previously validated algorithm for genome-scale knowledge synthesis and previously published case reports.

Conclusion: We conclude that ES should be ordered in cases of CDH+ when a specific diagnosis is not suspected and CNV analyses are negative. Our results also provide evidence in favour of phenotypic expansions involving CDH for genes associated with -congenital disorder of glycosylation, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Fanconi anaemia, Coffin-Siris syndrome and -related disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107317DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8286264PMC
January 2021

Evidence that FGFRL1 contributes to congenital diaphragmatic hernia development in humans.

Am J Med Genet A 2021 03 14;185(3):836-840. Epub 2021 Jan 14.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

Fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1) encodes a transmembrane protein that is related to fibroblast growth factor receptors but lacks an intercellular tyrosine kinase domain. in vitro studies suggest that FGFRL1 inhibits cell proliferation and promotes cell differentiation and cell adhesion. Mice that lack FGFRL1 die shortly after birth from respiratory distress and have abnormally thin diaphragms whose muscular hypoplasia allows the liver to protrude into the thoracic cavity. Haploinsufficiency of FGFRL1 has been hypothesized to contribute to the development of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. However, data from both humans and mice suggest that disruption of one copy of FGFRL1 alone is insufficient to cause diaphragm defects. Here we report a female fetus with CDH whose 4p16.3 deletion allows us to refine the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome CDH critical region to an approximately 1.9 Mb region that contains FGFRL1. We also report a male infant with isolated left-sided diaphragm agenesis who carried compound heterozygous missense variants in FGFRL1. These cases provide additional evidence that deleterious FGFRL1 variants may contribute to the development of CDH in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.62066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8011624PMC
March 2021

A Comprehensive Assessment of Co-occurring Birth Defects among Infants with Non-Syndromic Anophthalmia or Microphthalmia.

Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2021 10 20;28(5):428-435. Epub 2020 Dec 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Purpose: Infants with anophthalmia or microphthalmia frequently have co-occurring birth defects. Nonetheless, there have been few investigations of birth defect patterns among these children. Such studies may identify novel multiple malformation syndromes, which could inform future research into the developmental processes that lead to anophthalmia/microphthalmia and assist physicians in determining whether further testing is appropriate.

Methods: This study includes cases with anophthalmia/microphthalmia identified by the Texas Birth Defects Registry from 1999 to 2014 without clinical or chromosomal diagnoses of recognized syndromes. We calculated adjusted observed-to-expected ratios for two - through five-way birth defect combinations involving anophthalmia/microphthalmia to estimate whether these combinations co-occur more often than would be expected if they were independent. We report combinations observed in ≥5 cases.

Results: We identified 653 eligible cases with anophthalmia/microphthalmia (514 [79%] with co-occurring birth defects), and 111 birth defect combinations, of which 44 were two-way combinations, 61 were three-way combinations, six were four-way combinations and none were five-way combinations. Combinations with the largest observed-to-expected ratios were those involving central nervous system (CNS) defects, head/neck defects, and orofacial clefts. We also observed multiple combinations involving cardiovascular and musculoskeletal defects.

Conclusion: Consistent with previous reports, we observed that a large proportion of children diagnosed with anophthalmia/microphthalmia have co-occurring birth defects. While some of these defects may be part of a sequence involving anophthalmia/microphthalmia (e.g., CNS defects), other combinations could point to as yet undescribed susceptibility patterns (e.g., musculoskeletal defects). Data from population-based birth defect registries may be useful for accelerating the discovery of previously uncharacterized malformation syndromes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09286586.2020.1862244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8214631PMC
October 2021

Patterns of co-occurring birth defects among infants with hypospadias.

J Pediatr Urol 2021 02 12;17(1):64.e1-64.e8. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, UTHealth School of Public Health, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: Hypospadias, one of the most common male genital birth defects, occurs in 1 out of every 200 male births in the United States and is increasing in prevalence globally.

Objective: This study aimed to characterize the combinations of birth defects that co-occur with hypospadias more often than expected by chance, while accounting for the complex clustering patterns of congenital defects.

Study Design: We analyzed cases with hypospadias and at least one additional co-occurring defect from the Texas Birth Defect Registry born between 1999 and 2014. For each combination, we calculated adjusted observed-to-expected (O/E) ratios, using Co-Occurring Defect Analysis (CODA).

Results: Among 16,442 cases with hypospadias and without known syndromes, 2,084 (12.7%) had at least one additional defect. Many of the birth defect combinations within the highest adjusted O/E ratios included cardiac, musculoskeletal, and additional urogenital defects. For example, a top combination with an adjusted O/E of 139.0 included renal agenesis and dysgenesis, reduction defects of the upper limb, and other anomalies of upper limb (including shoulder girdle). High adjusted O/E ratios were also observed in combinations that included defects outside of the urogenital developmental field. For instance, the combination with the highest O/E ratio included buphthalmos, and congenital cataract and lens anomalies (adjusted O/E ratio: 192.9). Similar results were obtained when we restricted our analyses to cases with second- or third-degree hypospadias.

Discussion: Many combinations in the top results were expected (e.g., multiple urogenital defects); however, some combinations with seemingly unrelated patterns of defects may suggest the presence of some etiologic mechanisms yet to be identified.

Conclusion: In summary, this study described patterns of co-occurring defect combinations with hypospadias that can inform further study and may provide insights for screening and diagnostic practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2020.11.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7935759PMC
February 2021

BICRA, a SWI/SNF Complex Member, Is Associated with BAF-Disorder Related Phenotypes in Humans and Model Organisms.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 12 23;107(6):1096-1112. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Division of Clinical Genetics, Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.

SWI/SNF-related intellectual disability disorders (SSRIDDs) are rare neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by developmental disability, coarse facial features, and fifth digit/nail hypoplasia that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes that encode for members of the SWI/SNF (or BAF) family of chromatin remodeling complexes. We have identified 12 individuals with rare variants (10 loss-of-function, 2 missense) in the BICRA (BRD4 interacting chromatin remodeling complex-associated protein) gene, also known as GLTSCR1, which encodes a subunit of the non-canonical BAF (ncBAF) complex. These individuals exhibited neurodevelopmental phenotypes that include developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and behavioral abnormalities as well as dysmorphic features. Notably, the majority of individuals lack the fifth digit/nail hypoplasia phenotype, a hallmark of most SSRIDDs. To confirm the role of BICRA in the development of these phenotypes, we performed functional characterization of the zebrafish and Drosophila orthologs of BICRA. In zebrafish, a mutation of bicra that mimics one of the loss-of-function variants leads to craniofacial defects possibly akin to the dysmorphic facial features seen in individuals harboring putatively pathogenic BICRA variants. We further show that Bicra physically binds to other non-canonical ncBAF complex members, including the BRD9/7 ortholog, CG7154, and is the defining member of the ncBAF complex in flies. Like other SWI/SNF complex members, loss of Bicra function in flies acts as a dominant enhancer of position effect variegation but in a more context-specific manner. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of BICRA leads to a unique SSRIDD in humans whose phenotypes overlap with those previously reported.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.11.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7820627PMC
December 2020

Defining the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of X-linked MSL3-related disorder.

Genet Med 2021 02 11;23(2):384-395. Epub 2020 Nov 11.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Genetics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

Purpose: We sought to delineate the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of female and male individuals with X-linked, MSL3-related disorder (Basilicata-Akhtar syndrome).

Methods: Twenty-five individuals (15 males, 10 females) with causative variants in MSL3 were ascertained through exome or genome sequencing at ten different sequencing centers.

Results: We identified multiple variant types in MSL3 (ten nonsense, six frameshift, four splice site, three missense, one in-frame-deletion, one multi-exon deletion), most proven to be de novo, and clustering in the terminal eight exons suggesting that truncating variants in the first five exons might be compensated by an alternative MSL3 transcript. Three-dimensional modeling of missense and splice variants indicated that these have a deleterious effect. The main clinical findings comprised developmental delay and intellectual disability ranging from mild to severe. Autism spectrum disorder, muscle tone abnormalities, and macrocephaly were common as well as hearing impairment and gastrointestinal problems. Hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis emerged as a consistent magnetic resonance image (MRI) finding. Females and males were equally affected. Using facial analysis technology, a recognizable facial gestalt was determined.

Conclusion: Our aggregated data illustrate the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of X-linked, MSL3-related disorder (Basilicata-Akhtar syndrome). Our cohort improves the understanding of disease related morbidity and allows us to propose detailed surveillance guidelines for affected individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-00993-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7862064PMC
February 2021

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia as a prominent feature of a SPECC1L-related syndrome.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 12 21;182(12):2919-2925. Epub 2020 Sep 21.

Division of Human Genetics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH) confer substantial morbidity and mortality. Genetic defects, including chromosomal anomalies, copy number variants, and sequence variants are identified in ~30% of patients with CDH. A genetic etiology is not yet found in 70% of patients, however there is a growing number of genetic syndromes and single gene disorders associated with CDH. While there have been two reported individuals with X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome with MID1 mutations who have CDH as an associated feature, CDH appears to be a much more prominent feature of a SPECC1L-related autosomal dominant Opitz G/BBB syndrome. Features unique to autosomal dominant Opitz G/BBB syndrome include branchial fistulae, omphalocele, and a bicornuate uterus. Here we present one new individual and five previously reported individuals with CDH found to have SPECC1L mutations. These cases provide strong evidence that SPECC1L is a bona fide CDH gene. We conclude that a SPECC1L-related Opitz G/BBB syndrome should be considered in any patient with CDH who has additional features of hypertelorism, a prominent forehead, a broad nasal bridge, anteverted nares, cleft lip/palate, branchial fistulae, omphalocele, and/or bicornuate uterus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61878DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7988837PMC
December 2020

Phenotypic expansion in KIF1A-related dominant disorders: A description of novel variants and review of published cases.

Hum Mutat 2020 12 8;41(12):2094-2104. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

KIF1A is a molecular motor for membrane-bound cargo important to the development and survival of sensory neurons. KIF1A dysfunction has been associated with several Mendelian disorders with a spectrum of overlapping phenotypes, ranging from spastic paraplegia to intellectual disability. We present a novel pathogenic in-frame deletion in the KIF1A molecular motor domain inherited by two affected siblings from an unaffected mother with apparent germline mosaicism. We identified eight additional cases with heterozygous, pathogenic KIF1A variants ascertained from a local data lake. Our data provide evidence for the expansion of KIF1A-associated phenotypes to include hip subluxation and dystonia as well as phenotypes observed in only a single case: gelastic cataplexy, coxa valga, and double collecting system. We review the literature and suggest that KIF1A dysfunction is better understood as a single neuromuscular disorder with variable involvement of other organ systems than a set of discrete disorders converging at a single locus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.24118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7903881PMC
December 2020

Birth defects that co-occur with non-syndromic gastroschisis and omphalocele.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 11 4;182(11):2581-2593. Epub 2020 Sep 4.

Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, UTHealth School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, USA.

Gastroschisis and omphalocele are the two most common abdominal wall birth defects, and epidemiologic characteristics and frequency of occurrence as part of a syndromic condition suggest distinct etiologies between the two defects. We assessed complex patterns of defect co-occurrence with these defects separately using the Texas Birth Defects Registry. We used co-occurring defect analysis (CODA) to compute adjusted observed-to-expected (O/E) ratios for all observed birth defect patterns. There were 2,998 non-syndromic (i.e., no documented syndrome diagnosis identified) cases with gastroschisis and 789 (26%) of these had additional co-occurring defects. There were 720 non-syndromic cases with omphalocele, and 404 (56%) had additional co-occurring defects. Among the top 30 adjusted O/E ratios for gastroschisis, most of the co-occurring defects were related to the gastrointestinal system, though cardiovascular and kidney anomalies were also present. Several of the top 30 combinations co-occurring with omphalocele appeared suggestive of OEIS (omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, spinal defects) complex. After the exclusion of additional cases with features suggestive of OEIS in a post-hoc sensitivity analysis, the top combinations involving defects associated with OEIS (e.g., spina bifida) were no longer present. The remaining top combinations involving omphalocele included cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urogenital defects. In summary, we identified complex patterns of defects that co-occurred more frequently than expected with gastroschisis and omphalocele using a novel software platform. Better understanding differences in the patterns between gastroschisis and omphalocele could lead to additional etiologic insights.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61830DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8259712PMC
November 2020

Variants in SCAF4 Cause a Neurodevelopmental Disorder and Are Associated with Impaired mRNA Processing.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 09 29;107(3):544-554. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

University of South Dakota, Sanford School of Medicine, Sioux Falls, SD 57105, USA.

RNA polymerase II interacts with various other complexes and factors to ensure correct initiation, elongation, and termination of mRNA transcription. One of these proteins is SR-related CTD-associated factor 4 (SCAF4), which is important for correct usage of polyA sites for mRNA termination. Using exome sequencing and international matchmaking, we identified nine likely pathogenic germline variants in SCAF4 including two splice-site and seven truncating variants, all residing in the N-terminal two thirds of the protein. Eight of these variants occurred de novo, and one was inherited. Affected individuals demonstrated a variable neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mild intellectual disability, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, and various skeletal and structural anomalies. Paired-end RNA sequencing on blood lymphocytes of SCAF4-deficient individuals revealed a broad deregulation of more than 9,000 genes and significant differential splicing of more than 2,900 genes, indicating an important role of SCAF4 in mRNA processing. Knockdown of the SCAF4 ortholog CG4266 in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster resulted in impaired locomotor function, learning, and short-term memory. Furthermore, we observed an increased number of active zones in larval neuromuscular junctions, representing large glutamatergic synapses. These observations indicate a role of CG4266 in nervous system development and function and support the implication of SCAF4 in neurodevelopmental phenotypes. In summary, our data show that heterozygous, likely gene-disrupting variants in SCAF4 are causative for a variable neurodevelopmental disorder associated with impaired mRNA processing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.06.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7477272PMC
September 2020

mitochondrial disease: new patients and review of the genetic and clinical spectrum.

J Med Genet 2021 05 9;58(5):314-325. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Population Bio, Inc, New York, New York, USA

Background: The nucleotide binding protein-like () gene was first reported as a cause of mitochondrial complex I deficiency (MIM 613621, 618242) in 2010. To date, only eight patients have been reported with this mitochondrial disorder. Five other patients were recently reported to have disease but their clinical picture was different from the first eight patients. Here, we report clinical and genetic findings in five additional patients (four families).

Methods: Whole exome sequencing was used to identify patients with compound heterozygous variants. Functional studies included RNA-Seq transcript analyses, missense variant biochemical analyses in a yeast model () and mitochondrial respiration experiments on patient fibroblasts.

Results: The previously reported c.815-27T>C branch-site mutation was found in all four families. In prior patients, c.166G>A [p.G56R] was always found with c.815-27T>C, but only two of four families had both variants. The second variant found with c.815-27T>C in each family was: c.311T>C [p.L104P] in three patients, c.693+1G>A in one patient and c.545T>C [p.V182A] in one patient. Complex I function in the yeast model was impacted by p.L104P but not p.V182A. Clinical features include onset of neurological symptoms at 3-18 months, global developmental delay, cerebellar dysfunction (including ataxia, dysarthria, nystagmus and tremor) and spasticity. Brain MRI showed cerebellar atrophy. Mitochondrial function studies on patient fibroblasts showed significantly reduced spare respiratory capacity.

Conclusion: We report on five new patients with disease, adding to the number and phenotypic variability of patients diagnosed worldwide, and review prior reported patients with pathogenic variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-106846DOI Listing
May 2021

Recessive ACO2 variants as a cause of isolated ophthalmologic phenotypes.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 08 25;182(8):1960-1966. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.

The mitochondrial aconitase gene (ACO2) encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of citrate to isocitrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Biallelic variants in ACO2 are purported to cause two distinct disorders: infantile cerebellar-retinal degeneration (ICRD) which is characterized by CNS abnormalities, neurodevelopmental phenotypes, optic atrophy and retinal degeneration; and optic atrophy 9 (OPA9), characterized by isolated ophthalmologic phenotypes including optic atrophy and low vision. However, some doubt remains as to whether biallelic ACO2 variants can cause isolated ophthalmologic phenotypes. A review of the literature revealed five individuals from three families who carry biallelic ACO2 variants whose phenotypes are consistent with OPA9. Here, we describe a brother and sister with OPA9 who are compound heterozygous for novel missense variants in ACO2; c.[487G>T];[1894G>A], p.[(Val163Leu)];[(Val632Met)]. A review of pathogenic ACO2 variants revealed that those associated with OPA9 are distinct from those associated with ICRD. Missense variants associated with either OPA9 or ICRD do not cluster in distinct ACO2 domains, making it difficult to predict the severity of a variant based on position alone. We conclude that biallelic variants in ACO2 can cause the milder OPA9 phenotype, and that the OPA9-related ACO2 variants identified to date are distinct from those that cause ICRD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61634DOI Listing
August 2020

BAZ2B haploinsufficiency as a cause of developmental delay, intellectual disability, and autism spectrum disorder.

Hum Mutat 2020 05 7;41(5):921-925. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

The bromodomain adjacent to zinc finger 2B gene (BAZ2B) encodes a protein involved in chromatin remodeling. Loss of BAZ2B function has been postulated to cause neurodevelopmental disorders. To determine whether BAZ2B deficiency is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of these disorders, we performed bioinformatics analyses that demonstrated a high level of functional convergence during fetal cortical development between BAZ2B and genes known to cause autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and neurodevelopmental disorder. We also found an excess of de novo BAZ2B loss-of-function variants in exome sequencing data from previously published cohorts of individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. We subsequently identified seven additional individuals with heterozygous deletions, stop-gain, or de novo missense variants affecting BAZ2B. All of these individuals have developmental delay (DD), intellectual disability (ID), and/or ASD. Taken together, our findings suggest that haploinsufficiency of BAZ2B causes a neurodevelopmental disorder, whose cardinal features include DD, ID, and ASD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23992DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7262739PMC
May 2020

Further delineation of the phenotypic spectrum associated with hemizygous loss-of-function variants in NONO.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 04 28;182(4):652-658. Epub 2019 Dec 28.

Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas.

The non-POU domain containing, octamer-binding gene, NONO, is located on chromosome Xq13.1 and encodes a member of a small family of RNA and DNA binding proteins that perform a variety of tasks involved in RNA synthesis, transcriptional regulation and DNA repair. Hemizygous loss-of-function variants in NONO have been shown to cause mental retardation, X-linked, syndromic 34 in males. Features of this disorder can include a range of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), congenital heart defects, and CNS anomalies. To date only eight cases have been described in the literature. Here we report two unrelated patients and a miscarried fetus with loss-of-function variants in NONO. Their phenotypes, and a review of previously reported cases, demonstrate that hemizygous loss-of-function variants in NONO cause a recognizable genetic syndrome. The cardinal features of this condition include developmental delay, intellectual disability, hypotonia, macrocephaly, structural abnormalities affecting the corpus callosum and/or cerebellum, LVNC, congenital heart defects, and gastrointestinal/feeding issues. This syndrome also carries an increased risk for strabismus and cryptorchidism and is associated with dysmorphic features that include an elongated face, up/down-slanted palpebral fissures, frontal bossing, and malar hypoplasia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61466DOI Listing
April 2020

Novel Missense Variants in ADAT3 as a Cause of Syndromic Intellectual Disability.

J Pediatr Genet 2019 Dec 9;8(4):244-251. Epub 2019 Jul 9.

Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States.

Autosomal recessive variants in the adenosine deaminase, tRNA specific 3 ( ) gene cause a syndromic form of intellectual disability due to a loss of ADAT3 function. This disorder is characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech delay, abnormal brain structure, strabismus, microcephaly, and failure to thrive. A small subset of individuals with ADAT3 deficiency have other structural birth defects including atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, and micropenis. Here, we report a sibling pair with novel compound heterozygous missense variants that affect a conserved amino acid in the deaminase domain of ADAT3. These siblings have many of the features characteristic of this syndrome, including, intellectual disability, hypotonia, esotropia, failure to thrive, and microcephaly. Both had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), feeding problems, and aspiration requiring thickening of feeds. Although they have no words, their communication abilities progressed rapidly when they began to use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices. One of these siblings was born with an anterior congenital diaphragmatic hernia, which has not been reported previously in association with ADAT3 deficiency. We conclude that individuals with ADAT3 deficiency should be monitored for GERD, feeding problems, and aspiration in infancy. They may also benefit from the use of AAC devices and individualized educational programs that take into account their capacity for nonverbal language development. Additional studies in humans or animal models will be needed to determine if ADAT3 deficiency predisposes to the development of structural birth defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0039-1693151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824885PMC
December 2019

Disruption of PHF21A causes syndromic intellectual disability with craniofacial anomalies, epilepsy, hypotonia, and neurobehavioral problems including autism.

Mol Autism 2019 22;10:35. Epub 2019 Oct 22.

21Department of Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Korea.

Background: has been associated with intellectual disability and craniofacial anomalies based on its deletion in the Potocki-Shaffer syndrome region at 11p11.2 and its disruption in three patients with balanced translocations. In addition, three patients with de novo truncating mutations in were reported recently. Here, we analyze genomic data from seven unrelated individuals with mutations in and provide detailed clinical descriptions, further expanding the phenotype associated with PHF21A haploinsufficiency.

Methods: Diagnostic trio whole exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing, use of GeneMatcher, targeted gene panel sequencing, and MiSeq sequencing techniques were used to identify and confirm variants. RT-qPCR was used to measure the normal expression pattern of in multiple human tissues including 13 different brain tissues. Protein-DNA modeling was performed to substantiate the pathogenicity of the missense mutation.

Results: We have identified seven heterozygous coding mutations, among which six are de novo (not maternal in one). Mutations include four frameshifts, one nonsense mutation in two patients, and one heterozygous missense mutation in the AT Hook domain, predicted to be deleterious and likely to cause loss of PHF21A function. We also found a new C-terminal domain composed of an intrinsically disordered region. This domain is truncated in six patients and thus likely to play an important role in the function of PHF21A, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the likely underlying mechanism in the phenotype of seven patients. Our results extend the phenotypic spectrum of mutations by adding autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, hypotonia, and neurobehavioral problems. Furthermore, is highly expressed in the human fetal brain, which is consistent with the neurodevelopmental phenotype.

Conclusion: Deleterious nonsense, frameshift, and missense mutations disrupting the AT Hook domain and/or an intrinsically disordered region in PHF21A were found to be associated with autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, hypotonia, neurobehavioral problems, tapering fingers, clinodactyly, and syndactyly, in addition to intellectual disability and craniofacial anomalies. This suggests that is involved in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, and its haploinsufficiency causes a diverse neurological phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13229-019-0286-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6805429PMC
June 2020

Clinical spectrum of individuals with pathogenic NF1 missense variants affecting p.Met1149, p.Arg1276, and p.Lys1423: genotype-phenotype study in neurofibromatosis type 1.

Hum Mutat 2020 01 26;41(1):299-315. Epub 2019 Oct 26.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

We report 281 individuals carrying a pathogenic recurrent NF1 missense variant at p.Met1149, p.Arg1276, or p.Lys1423, representing three nontruncating NF1 hotspots in the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) cohort, together identified in 1.8% of unrelated NF1 individuals. About 25% (95% confidence interval: 20.5-31.2%) of individuals heterozygous for a pathogenic NF1 p.Met1149, p.Arg1276, or p.Lys1423 missense variant had a Noonan-like phenotype, which is significantly more compared with the "classic" NF1-affected cohorts (all p < .0001). Furthermore, p.Arg1276 and p.Lys1423 pathogenic missense variants were associated with a high prevalence of cardiovascular abnormalities, including pulmonic stenosis (all p < .0001), while p.Arg1276 variants had a high prevalence of symptomatic spinal neurofibromas (p < .0001) compared with "classic" NF1-affected cohorts. However, p.Met1149-positive individuals had a mild phenotype, characterized mainly by pigmentary manifestations without externally visible plexiform neurofibromas, symptomatic spinal neurofibromas or symptomatic optic pathway gliomas. As up to 0.4% of unrelated individuals in the UAB cohort carries a p.Met1149 missense variant, this finding will contribute to more accurate stratification of a significant number of NF1 individuals. Although clinically relevant genotype-phenotype correlations are rare in NF1, each affecting only a small percentage of individuals, together they impact counseling and management of a significant number of the NF1 population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23929DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6973139PMC
January 2020

Disruptive variants of associate with autism and interfere with neuronal development and synaptic transmission.

Sci Adv 2019 09 25;5(9):eaax2166. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

Center for Medical Genetics and Hunan Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China.

RNA binding proteins are key players in posttranscriptional regulation and have been implicated in neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we report a significant burden of heterozygous, likely gene-disrupting variants in (encoding a highly constrained RNA binding protein) among patients with autism and related neurodevelopmental disabilities. Analysis of 17 patients identifies common phenotypes including autism, intellectual disability, language and motor delay, seizures, macrocephaly, and variable ocular abnormalities. HITS-CLIP revealed that Csde1-binding targets are enriched in autism-associated gene sets, especially FMRP targets, and in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity-related pathways. Csde1 knockdown in primary mouse cortical neurons leads to an overgrowth of the neurites and abnormal dendritic spine morphology/synapse formation and impaired synaptic transmission, whereas mutant and knockdown experiments in result in defects in synapse growth and synaptic transmission. Our study defines a new autism-related syndrome and highlights the functional role of CSDE1 in synapse development and synaptic transmission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aax2166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6760934PMC
September 2019

Widening of the genetic and clinical spectrum of Lamb-Shaffer syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder due to SOX5 haploinsufficiency.

Genet Med 2020 03 3;22(3):524-537. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

CHU de Rennes, service de génétique clinique, Rennes, France.

Purpose: Lamb-Shaffer syndrome (LAMSHF) is a neurodevelopmental disorder described in just over two dozen patients with heterozygous genetic alterations involving SOX5, a gene encoding a transcription factor regulating cell fate and differentiation in neurogenesis and other discrete developmental processes. The genetic alterations described so far are mainly microdeletions. The present study was aimed at increasing our understanding of LAMSHF, its clinical and genetic spectrum, and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved.

Methods: Clinical and genetic data were collected through GeneMatcher and clinical or genetic networks for 41 novel patients harboring various types ofSOX5 alterations. Functional consequences of selected substitutions were investigated.

Results: Microdeletions and truncating variants occurred throughout SOX5. In contrast, most missense variants clustered in the pivotal SOX-specific high-mobility-group domain. The latter variants prevented SOX5 from binding DNA and promoting transactivation in vitro, whereas missense variants located outside the high-mobility-group domain did not. Clinical manifestations and severity varied among patients. No clear genotype-phenotype correlations were found, except that missense variants outside the high-mobility-group domain were generally better tolerated.

Conclusions: This study extends the clinical and genetic spectrum associated with LAMSHF and consolidates evidence that SOX5 haploinsufficiency leads to variable degrees of intellectual disability, language delay, and other clinical features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0657-0DOI Listing
March 2020
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