Publications by authors named "Darryl Wan"

5 Publications

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Atrial arrhythmias and thromboembolic complications in adults post Fontan surgery.

Open Heart 2020 10;7(2)

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Objective: Patients with Fontan surgery experience late complications in adulthood. We studied the factors associated with the development and maintenance of atrial arrhythmias and thromboembolic complications in an adult population with univentricuar physiology post Fontan surgery.

Methods: Single centre retrospective cohort study of patients ≥18 years of age with Fontan circulation followed at our quaternary care centre for more than 1 year were included. Univariate and multivariate regression models were used where applicable to ascertain clinically significant associations between risk factors and complications.

Results: 93 patients were included (age 30.2±8.8 years, 58% men). 28 (30%) had atriopulmonary Fontan connection, 35 (37.6%) had lateral tunnel Fontan and 29 (31.1%) had extracardiac Fontan pathway. After a mean of 7.27±5.1 years, atrial arrhythmia was noted in 37 patients (39.8%), of which 13 developed had atrial fibrillation (14%). The presence of atrial arrhythmia was associated with the number of prior cardiac surgeries/procedures, increasing age and prior atriopulmonary Fontan operation. Thromboembolic events were present in 31 patients (33%); among them 14 had stroke (45%), 3 had transient ischaemic attack (9.7%), 7 had pulmonary embolism (22.6%) and 5 had atrial thrombus with imaging (16.1%). The presence of thromboembolic events was only associated with age and the presence of cirrhosis in multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: Atrial arrhythmias are common in adults with Fontan circulation at an early age, and are associated with prior surgical history and increasing age. Traditional risk factors may not be associated with atrial arrhythmia or thromboembolism in this cohort.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/openhrt-2019-001224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7566428PMC
October 2020

Driving Restrictions and Early Arrhythmias in Patients Receiving a Primary-Prevention Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (DREAM-ICD) Study.

Can J Cardiol 2020 08 28;36(8):1269-1277. Epub 2020 May 28.

Heart Rhythm Services, Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address:

Background: Current guidelines recommend 4 weeks of private driving restriction after implantation of a primary-prevention implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). These driving restrictions result in significant inconvenience and social implications. Advances in medical treatment and ICD programming have lowered the overall rate of device therapies. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of ICD therapies at 30, 60, and 180 days after implantation.

Methods: Driving Restrictions and Early Arrhythmias in Patients Receiving a Primary-Prevention Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (DREAM-ICD) was a retrospective cohort study conducted at 2 Canadian university centres enrolling patients with new implantation of a primary-prevention ICD. Device programming was standardised according to current guidelines. A total of 803 patients were enrolled.

Results: The cumulative rates of appropriate ICD therapies at 30, 60, and 180 days were 0.12%, 0.50%, and 0.75%, respectively. There was no syncope during the first 6 months. The median duration to the first appropriate ICD therapy was 208 (range 23-1109) days after implantation. The rate of inappropriate ICD therapies at 30 days was only 0.2%. Overall, < 13.6% of all appropriate ICD therapies occurred within the first 6 months after implantation.

Conclusions: The rate of appropriate ICD therapies within the first 30 days after device insertion is extremely low in contemporary primary prevention cohorts with guideline-concordant device programming. There was no increased risk for ventricular arrhythmia early after ICD insertion. The results of DREAM-ICD suggest the need for a revision of the existing driving restrictions for primary-prevention ICD recipients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjca.2020.05.029DOI Listing
August 2020

Insonation versus Auscultation in Valvular Disorders: Is Aortic Stenosis the Exception? A Systematic Review.

Ann Glob Health 2019 07 11;85(1). Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Heart, New York, US.

Background: Handheld echocardiography is being proposed as the fifth pillar of bedside physical cardiovascular examination (PE) and is referred to as insonation. Although there is emerging consensus that insonation is superior to PE for diagnosis of various cardiac conditions, superiority has not been consistently demonstrated for various valvular heart disease (VHD) lesions. The objective of this review is to systematically review the accuracy of insonation and auscultation in published literature for detection of common VHD.

Methods: An extensive literature search across three commonly used public databases allowed comparison of diagnostic characteristics of insonation and auscultation for common VHD including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, aortic regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of insonation and auscultation for the detection of these VHD lesions were extracted for further analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed according to Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology.

Results: Eight hundred eighty studies were screened, and seven observational studies were selected for full analysis. Due to heterogeneity of data, this study was not amenable to meta-analysis. Insonation was superior to auscultation for the detection of all regurgitant lesions, but there was no significant difference in diagnostic ability of the two strategies for detection of aortic stenosis.

Conclusions: Compared to auscultation, insonation, in its currently available form, is a superior diagnostic tool for regurgitant lesions. However, insonation fails to improve upon auscultation for recognition of aortic stenosis. This limitation is likely due to absence of spectral Doppler and inability of HE to assess transvalvular velocity and gradient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/aogh.2489DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6634326PMC
July 2019

Anticoagulation for Thromboembolic Risk Reduction in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

Can J Cardiol 2017 12 19;33(12):1597-1603. Epub 2017 Aug 19.

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address:

Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) represent one of the fastest expanding groups of patients in contemporary practice with unique and often complex management pathways. ACHD have a higher risk of thromboembolism not only from their complex physiology and anatomy but also from substrates such as valvular heart disease, atrial arrhythmias, cyanosis, and ventricular dysfunction, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Thromboembolic event rates in ACHD have been shown to be related to Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age (≥75 years), Diabetes, Stroke/Transient Ischemic Attack, Vascular Disease, Age (65-74 years), Sex (Female) (CHADS-VASc) scores (0.75%, 1.24%, and 2.65% per patient-year for CHADS-VASc scores of 0, 1, and ≥ 2 respectively), but are likely more strongly associated with disease complexity. However, optimum anticoagulation strategies have not been studied extensively in this group, mostly because of their heterogeneity and complex clinical profiles. Individual comorbidities, disease severity, and the presence of prosthetic material must be taken into consideration when determining the ideal anticoagulation strategy in pregnant patients. With improving survival and expanding treatment options, the requirement of thromboprophylaxis is steadily increasing, however, safety, choice, and duration of anticoagulation strategies in this group has not been well studied. In this review we aim to highlight the current understanding of antithrombotic therapy in the ACHD population, with discussion regarding special considerations in unique clinical situations relevant to ACHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjca.2017.08.009DOI Listing
December 2017

Life-threatening outcomes associated with autonomic dysreflexia: a clinical review.

J Spinal Cord Med 2014 Jan 26;37(1):2-10. Epub 2013 Nov 26.

Context Autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is a life-threatening complication of chronic traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective To document and provide insight into the life-threatening sequelae associated with AD. Methods A review was conducted to identify literature which documented cases of AD associated with life-threatening outcomes (and death). The search strategy comprised of a keyword search on the PubMed database as well as manual searches of retrieved articles. Outcomes were categorized into three main classes: central nervous system (CNS), cardiovascular (CV), and pulmonary. Results Thirty-two cases of death or life-threatening complications of AD were found. Twenty-three (72%) cases were CNS-related, seven (22%) cases were CV-related, and two (6%) cases were pulmonary-related. In total, seven (22%) deaths were noted as a direct result of complications following an AD attack. Conclusion AD is a well-known consequence of SCI among individuals with high thoracic and cervical injuries. Many of these individuals experience this condition on a daily basis. Medical personnel, care givers, and individuals with SCI should be aware of the importance of timely diagnosis and management of this life-threatening condition, which can result in a variety of significant complications including stroke, seizures, myocardial ischemia, and death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/2045772313Y.0000000098DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4066548PMC
January 2014