Publications by authors named "Dario Gastaldi"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Development of a micro-scale method to assess the effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of a biodegradable Fe-316L stent material.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2021 02 1;114:104173. Epub 2020 Nov 1.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, 817 Sherbrooke St. West, Room 270, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 0C3, Canada; Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger Street, Montreal, Quebec, H1T 1C8, Canada. Electronic address:

The application of biodegradable materials to stent design has the potential to transform coronary artery disease treatment. It is critical that biodegradable stents have sustained strength during degradation and vessel healing to prevent re-occlusion. Proper assessment of the impact of corrosion on the mechanical behaviour of potential biomaterials is important. Investigations within literature frequently implement simplified testing conditions to understand this behaviour and fail to consider size effects associated with strut thickness, or the increase in corrosion due to blood flow, both of which can impact material properties. A protocol was developed that utilizes micro-scale specimens, in conjunction with dynamic degradation, to assess the effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of a novel Fe-316L material. Dynamic degradation led to increased specimen corrosion, resulting in a greater reduction in strength after 48 h of degradation in comparison to samples statically corroded. It was found that thicker micro-tensile samples (h > 200 μm) had a greater loss of strength in comparison to its thinner counterpart (h < 200 μm), due to increased corrosion of the thicker samples (203 MPa versus 260 MPa after 48 h, p = 0.0017). This investigation emphasizes the necessity of implementing physiologically relevant testing conditions, including dynamic corrosion and stent strut thickness, when evaluating potential biomaterials for biodegradable stent application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2020.104173DOI Listing
February 2021

An experimental procedure to perform mechanical characterization of small-sized bone specimens from thin femoral cortical wall.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2020 12 1;112:104046. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering Giulio Natta, Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics (LaBS) - Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133, Milano, Italy. Electronic address:

The cortical shell of the femoral neck plays a role in determining the overall neck strength. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the mechanical properties of cortical tissue of the femoral neck due to challenges in implementing accurate testing protocols for the thin shell. Indeed, mechanical properties are commonly derived from mechanical testing performed on tissue samples extracted from the femoral diaphysis, i.e. assuming tissue homogeneity along the femur. The aim of this work was to set up a reliable methodology to determine mechanical properties of bone samples extracted from thin cortical shell of the femoral neck. A three-point bending test was used to determine elastic and post-elastic properties of cortical bone samples extracted from the inferior and superior femoral neck. An optical system was used to monitor the sample deflection. Accuracy was preliminarily evaluated by determining the elastic modulus of an aluminium alloy. A good intra- and inter-sample variability was found on determining aluminium elastic modulus: 1.6% and 3.6%, respectively. Additionally, aluminium elastic modulus value was underestimated by less than 1%. A pilot trial was performed on a human femoral neck to assess the procedure feasibility. A total of 22 samples were extracted from the inferior and superior femoral neck and successfully tested. Preliminary results suggest that mechanical properties of cortical bone tissue extracted from human femoral neck might be side dependent, the superior tissue seems to exhibit better mechanical properties than the inferior one, at least in terms of yield stress and maximum strain. This supposedly different mechanical competence must be further investigated. The proposed procedure makes it feasible to carry out such studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2020.104046DOI Listing
December 2020

Biomimetic engineering of the cardiac tissue through processing, functionalization, and biological characterization of polyester urethanes.

Biomed Mater 2018 07 3;13(5):055006. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Institute of Clinical Physiology, IFC-CNR, Via Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.

Three-dimensional (3D) tissue models offer new tools in the study of diseases. In the case of the engineering of cardiac muscle, a realistic goal would be the design of a scaffold able to replicate the tissue-specific architecture, mechanical properties, and chemical composition, so that it recapitulates the main functions of the tissue. This work is focused on the design and preliminary biological validation of an innovative polyester urethane (PUR) scaffold mimicking cardiac tissue properties. The porous scaffold was fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butanediisocyanate, and l-lysine ethyl ester. Morphological and mechanical scaffolds characterization was accomplished by confocal microscopy, and micro-tensile and compression techniques. Scaffolds were then functionalized with fibronectin by plasma treatment, and the surface treatment was studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra, and contact angle measurements. Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were seeded on scaffolds, and their colonization, survival, and beating activity were analyzed for 14 days. Signal transduction pathways and apoptosis involved in cells, the structural development of the heart, and its metabolism were analyzed. PUR scaffolds showed a porous-aligned structure and mechanical properties consistent with that of the myocardial tissue. Cardiomyocytes plated on the scaffolds showed a high survival rate and a stable beating activity. Serine/threonine kinase (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation was higher in cardiomyocytes cultured on the PUR scaffold compared to those on tissue culture plates. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed a significant modulation at 14 days of cardiac muscle (MYH7, prepro-ET-1), hypertrophy-specific (CTGF), and metabolism-related (SLC2a1, PFKL) genes in PUR scaffolds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-605X/aaca5bDOI Listing
July 2018

Micro-CT based finite element models for elastic properties of glass-ceramic scaffolds.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2017 01 23;65:248-255. Epub 2016 Aug 23.

Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics (LaBS) - Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy; I.R.C.C.S., Via R. Galeazzi 4, 20161 Milano, Italy. Electronic address:

In this study, the mechanical properties of porous glass-ceramic scaffolds are investigated by means of three-dimensional finite element models based on micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scan data. In particular, the quantitative relationship between the morpho-architectural features of the obtained scaffolds, such as macroscopic porosity and strut thickness, and elastic properties, is sought. The macroscopic elastic properties of the scaffolds have been obtained through numerical homogenization approaches using the mechanical characteristics of the solid walls of the scaffolds (assessed through nanoindentation) as input parameters for the numerical simulations. Anisotropic mechanical properties of the produced scaffolds have also been investigated by defining a suitable anisotropy index. A comparison with morphological data obtained through the micro-CT scans is also presented. The proposed study shows that the produced glass-ceramic scaffolds exhibited a macroscopic porosity ranging between 29% and 97% which corresponds to an average stiffness ranging between 42.4GPa and 36MPa. A quantitative estimation of the isotropy of the macroscopic elastic properties has been performed showing that the samples with higher solid fractions were those closest to an isotropic material.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2016.08.020DOI Listing
January 2017

Repair of osteochondral defects in the minipig model by OPF hydrogel loaded with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

Regen Med 2015 ;10(2):135-51

IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi; Via R. Galeazzi 4, 20161 Milano, Italy.

Aim: Critical knee osteochondral defects in seven adult minipigs were treated with oligo(polyethylene glycol)fumarate (OPF) hydrogel combined with autologous or human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), and evaluated after 6 months.

Methods: Four defects were made on the peripheral part of right trochleas (n = 28), and treated with OPF scaffold alone or pre-seeded with ASCs.

Results: A better quality cartilage tissue characterized by improved biomechanical properties and higher collagen type II expression was observed in the defects treated by autologous or human ASC-loaded OPF; similarly this approach induced the regeneration of more mature bone with upregulation of collagen type I expression.

Conclusion: This study provides the evidence that both porcine and human adipose-derived stem cells associated to OPF hydrogel allow improving osteochondral defect regeneration in a minipig model.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/rme.14.77DOI Listing
January 2016

A quantitative interpretation of the response of articular cartilage to atomic force microscopy-based dynamic nanoindentation tests.

J Biomech Eng 2015 Jul 2;137(7). Epub 2015 Jun 2.

In this paper, a quantitative interpretation for atomic force microscopy-based dynamic nanoindentation (AFM-DN) tests on the superficial layers of bovine articular cartilage (AC) is provided. The relevant constitutive parameters of the tissue are estimated by fitting experimental results with a finite element model in the frequency domain. Such model comprises a poroelastic stress-strain relationship for a fibril reinforced tissue constitution, assuming a continuous distribution of the collagen network orientations. The identification procedure was first validated using a simplified transversely isotropic constitutive relationship; then, the experimental data were manually fitted by using the continuous distribution fibril model. Tissue permeability is derived from the maximum value of the phase shift between the input harmonic loading and the harmonic tissue response. Tissue parameters related to the stiffness are obtained from the frequency response of the experimental storage modulus and phase shift. With this procedure, an axial to transverse stiffness ratio (anisotropy ratio) of about 0.15 is estimated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/1.4030175DOI Listing
July 2015

Experimental data confirm numerical modeling of the degradation process of magnesium alloys stents.

Acta Biomater 2013 Nov 2;9(10):8730-9. Epub 2012 Nov 2.

Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

Biodegradable magnesium alloy stents (MAS) could present improved long-term clinical performances over commercial bare metal or drug-eluting stents. However, MAS were found to show limited mechanical support for diseased vessels due to fast degradation. Optimizing stent design through finite element analysis (FEA) is an efficient way to improve such properties. Following previous FEA works on design optimization and degradation modeling of MAS, this work carried out an experimental validation for the developed FEA model, thus proving its practical applicability of simulating MAS degradation. Twelve stent samples of AZ31B were manufactured according to two MAS designs (an optimized one and a conventional one), with six samples of each design. All the samples were balloon expanded and subsequently immersed in D-Hanks' solution for a degradation test lasting 14 days. The experimental results showed that the samples of the optimized design had better corrosion resistance than those of the conventional design. Furthermore, the degradation process of the samples was dominated by uniform and stress corrosion. With the good match between the simulation and the experimental results, the work shows that the FEA numerical modeling constitutes an effective tool for design and thus the improvement of novel biodegradable MAS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2012.10.035DOI Listing
November 2013

Sequential structural and fluid dynamic numerical simulations of a stented bifurcated coronary artery.

J Biomech Eng 2011 Dec;133(12):121010

Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy.

Despite their success, stenting procedures are still associated to some clinical problems like sub-acute thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Several clinical studies associate these phenomena to a combination of both structural and hemodynamic alterations caused by stent implantation. Recently, numerical models have been widely used in the literature to investigate stenting procedures but always from either a purely structural or fluid dynamic point of view. The aim of this work is the implementation of sequential structural and fluid dynamic numerical models to provide a better understanding of stenting procedures in coronary bifurcations. In particular, the realistic geometrical configurations obtained with structural simulations were used to create the fluid domains employed within transient fluid dynamic analyses. This sequential approach was applied to investigate the final kissing balloon (FKB) inflation during the provisional side branch technique. Mechanical stresses in the arterial wall and the stent as well as wall shear stresses along the arterial wall were examined before and after the FKB deployment. FKB provoked average mechanical stresses in the arterial wall almost 2.5 times higher with respect to those induced by inflation of the stent in the main branch only. Results also enlightened FKB benefits in terms of improved local blood flow pattern for the side branch access. As a drawback, the FKB generates a larger region of low wall shear stress. In particular, after FKB the percentage of area characterized by wall shear stresses lower than 0.5 Pa was 79.0%, while before the FKB it was 62.3%. For these reasons, a new tapered balloon dedicated to bifurcations was proposed. The inclusion of the modified balloon has reduced the mechanical stresses in the proximal arterial vessel to 40% and the low wall shear stress coverage area to 71.3%. In conclusion, these results show the relevance of the adopted sequential approach to study the wall mechanics and the hemodynamics created by stent deployment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/1.4005476DOI Listing
December 2011

Predicting fatigue life of a PMMA based knee spacer using a multiaxial fatigue criterion.

J Appl Biomater Biomech 2011 Sep-Dec;9(3):185-92

Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Italy.

Purpose: Experimental tests have played a major role in the assessment of fatigue endurance of orthopedic prostheses; however, cyclic tests on devices entail high costs. Here, a multiaxial fatigue criterion coupled with computational simulations and material properties measurements has been employed to predict fatigue life of the tibial component of a polymeric PMMA spacer. The ultimate aim is to obtain valid information on fatigue behavior avoiding fatigue tests on the device.

Methods: First, an accurate measurement of the static and fatigue properties of PMMA samples is performed. Then, numeric simulations of the fatigue behavior of the PMMA spacer reproducing the experimental test conditions according to ISO 14879-1 were carried out in order to calculate the stress field throughout the device. Finally, a Risk Index was calculated by using a proper multiaxial fatigue criterion for brittle materials (Kakuno-Kawada) for the assessment of the device fatigue behavior by predicting the F-N curves.

Results: The numeric results were validated by comparing the predictions against experimental data already published by our group. The multiaxial fatigue criterion was able to predict the most critical point on the spacer upper surface and the fatigue behavior of the device that nicely matched the experimental curves.

Conclusions: This approach represents a valuable tool to investigate the mechanical reliability of implantable devices; nevertheless, the use of advanced and specific failure criteria coupled with accurate data of the device’s material is mandatory to represent a real alternative to the experimental approach in fatigue life prediction.??Key words: Acrylic bone cement, Fatigue endurance, Finite element analyses, Knee spacer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/JABB.2011.8917DOI Listing
May 2012

Role of damage mechanics in nanoindentation of lamellar bone at multiple sizes: experiments and numerical modeling.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2011 Nov 12;4(8):1852-63. Epub 2011 Jun 12.

Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics (LaBS), Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.

The aim of this paper is to show that damage mechanisms can account for the response of lamellar bone to nanoindentation tests, with particular regards to the decrease of indentation stiffness with increasing penetration depth and to the loss of contact stiffness during the unloading phase of the test. For this purpose, indentation experiments on bovine cortical bone samples along axial and transverse directions have been carried out at five penetration depths from 50 to 450 nm; furthermore, a continuum damage model has been implemented into finite element analyses, which are able to simulate indentation experiments. Experiments along the axial direction have shown a decrease of about 20% of the indentation modulus with indentation depth; a similar trend was found along the transverse direction. All unloading branches of the force-displacement indentation curves exhibited relevant stiffness loss (curve concavity). The numerical model with damage was able to correctly predict the indentation stiffness and hardness at 300 nm penetration depth along both axial and transverse directions. Furthermore, stiffness loss during unloading was simulated with both qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments. A final validation has been provided by simulating axial indentation experiments at the remaining penetration depths using the same set of constitutive parameters as those used to simulate the experiments at 300 nm depth. These results support the hypothesis that damage plays a relevant role in the mechanics of lamellar bone and should be taken into account when studying bone mechanical properties at multiple scales.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2011.06.002DOI Listing
November 2011

Trends in biomedical engineering: focus on Patient Specific Modeling and Life Support Systems.

J Appl Biomater Biomech 2011 May-Aug;9(2):109-17

Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy.

Over the last twenty years major advancements have taken place in the design of medical devices and personalized therapies. They have paralleled the impressive evolution of three-dimensional, non invasive, medical imaging techniques and have been continuously fuelled by increasing computing power and the emergence of novel and sophisticated software tools. This paper aims to showcase a number of major contributions to the advancements of modeling of surgical and interventional procedures and to the design of life support systems. The selected examples will span from pediatric cardiac surgery procedures to valve and ventricle repair techniques, from stent design and endovascular procedures to life support systems and innovative ventilation techniques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/JABB.2011.8585DOI Listing
March 2013

Trends in biomedical engineering: focus on Smart Bio-Materials and Drug Delivery.

J Appl Biomater Biomech 2011 May-Aug;9(2):87-97

Bioengineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy.

The present article reviews on different research lines, namely: drug and gene delivery, surface modification/modeling, design of advanced materials (shape memory polymers and biodegradable stents), presently developed at Politecnico di Milano, Italy. For gene delivery, non-viral polycationic-branched polyethylenimine (b-PEI) polyplexes are coated with pectin, an anionic polysaccharide, to enhance the polyplex stability and decrease b-PEI cytotoxicity. Perfluorinated materials, specifically perfluoroether, and perfluoro-polyether fluids are proposed as ultrasound contrast agents and smart agents for drug delivery. Non-fouling, self-assembled PEG-based monolayers are developed on titanium surfaces with the aim of drastically reducing cariogenic bacteria adhesion on dental implants. Femtosecond laser microfabrication is used for selectively and spatially tuning the wettability of polymeric biomaterials and the effects of femtosecond laser ablation on the surface properties of polymethylmethacrylate are studied. Innovative functionally graded Alumina-Ti coatings for wear resistant articulating surfaces are deposited with PLD and characterized by means of a combined experimental and computational approach. Protein adsorption on biomaterials surfaces with an unlike wettability and surface-modification induced by pre-adsorbed proteins are studied by atomistic computer simulations. A study was performed on the fabrication of porous Shape Memory Polymeric structures and on the assessment of their potential application in minimally invasive surgical procedures. A model of magnesium (alloys) degradation, in a finite element framework analysis, and a bottom-up multiscale analysis for modeling the degradation mechanism of PLA matrices was developed, with the aim of providing valuable tools for the design of bioresorbable stents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/JABB.2011.8563DOI Listing
March 2013

Computational finite element model of cardiac torsion.

Int J Artif Organs 2011 Jan;34(1):44-53

Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Milan - Italy.

Purpose: A novel finite-element model of ventricular torsion for the analysis of the twisting behavior of the left human ventricle was developed, in order to investigate the influence of various biomechanical parameters on cardiac kinematics.

Methods: The ventricle was simulated as a thick-walled ellipsoid composed of nine concentric layers. Arrays of reinforcement bars were embedded in each layer to mimic physiological myocardial anisotropy. The reinforcement bars were activated through an artificial combination of thermal and mechanical effects in order to obtain a contractile behavior which is similar to that of myocardial fibers. The presence of an incompressible fluid inside the ventricular cavity was also simulated and the ventricle was combined with simple lumped-parameter hydraulic circuits reproducing preload and afterload. Changes to a number of cardiac parameters, such as preload, afterload and fiber angle orientation were introduced, in order to study the effects of these changes on cardiac torsion.

Results: The model is able to reproduce a similar torsional behavior to that of a physiological heart. The results of the simulations showed that there was sound correspondence between the model outcomes and available data from the literature. Results confirmed the importance of symmetric transmural patterns for fiber orientation.

Conclusions: This model represents an important step on the path towards unveiling the complexity of cardiac torsion. It proves to be a practical and versatile tool which could assist clinicians and researchers by providing them with easily-accessible, detailed data on cardiac kinematics for future diagnostic and surgical purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/ijao.2011.6313DOI Listing
January 2011

Modelling of the provisional side-branch stenting approach for the treatment of atherosclerotic coronary bifurcations: effects of stent positioning.

Biomech Model Mechanobiol 2010 Oct 14;9(5):551-61. Epub 2010 Feb 14.

Structural Engineering Department, Politecnico di Milano, Italy.

The most common approach to treat atherosclerosis in coronary bifurcations is the provisional side-branch (PSB) stenting, which consists sequentially of the insertion of a stent in the main branch (MB) of the bifurcation and a dilatation of the side branch (SB) passing through the struts of the stent at the bifurcation. This approach can be followed by a redilatation of the MB only or by a Final Kissing Balloon (FKB) inflation, both strategies leading to a minor stent distortion in the MB. The positioning of the stent struts in the bifurcation and the stresses generated in the stent and vessel wall are worthy of investigation for a better understanding of the mechanobiology of the system. For this purpose, a computer model of an atherosclerotic coronary bifurcation based on the finite element method was developed; the effects of performing the final redilatation with the two strategies utilising one or two balloons and those created by a different stent strut positioning around the SB were investigated. Results correlate well with previous experimental tests regarding the deformation following balloon expansion. Furthermore, results confirm firstly that the re-establishment of an optimal spatial configuration of the stent after the PSB approach is achieved with both strategies; secondly, results show that case of stent positioning with one cell placed centrally (with regard to the SB) should be preferred, avoiding the presence of struts inside the vessel lumen, which may reduce hemodynamic disturbances. The central positioning also resulted in a better solution in terms of lower stresses in the stent struts and, more importantly, in the vascular tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10237-010-0196-8DOI Listing
October 2010

A finite element model of the L4-L5 spinal motion segment: biomechanical compatibility of an interspinous device.

Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 2005 Feb;8(1):7-16

Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, 32-20133 Milano, Italy.

The biomechanical compatibility of an interspinous device, used for the "dynamic stabilization" of a diseased spinal motion segment, was investigated. The behaviour of an implant made of titanium based alloy (Ti6Al4V) and that of an implant made of a super-elastic alloy (Ni-Ti) have been compared. The assessment of the biomechanical compatibility was achieved by means of the finite element method, in which suitable constitutive laws have been adopted for the annulus fibrosus and for the metal alloys. The model was aimed at simulating the healthy, the nucleotomized and the treated L4-L5 lumbar segment, subjected to compressive force and flexion-extension as well as lateral flexion moments. The computational model has shown that both the implants were able to achieve their main design purpose, which is to diminish the forces acting on the apophyseal joints. Nevertheless, the Ni-Ti implant has shown a more physiological flexural stiffness with respect to the Ti6Al4V implant, which exhibited an excessive stiffness and permanent strains (plastic strains), even under physiological loads. The computational models presented in this paper seems to be a promising tool able to predict the effectiveness of a biomedical device and to select the materials to be used for the implant manufacturing, within an engineering approach to the clinical problem of the spinal diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10255840500062914DOI Listing
February 2005

The effect of fixture neck design in a realistic model of dental implant: a finite element approach.

Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin 2003 Oct-Dec;6(5-6):289-97

The aim of this work is to develop an accurate finite element model able to reproduce a standard experimental set-up for the evaluation of mechanical failure of a dental implant system. The considered system is composed of a fixture, an abutment and a connecting screw. We analysed the behaviour of the implant system considering three different designs of the fixture, in order to establish which one provides the better mechanical behaviour. After the definition of the numerical models, loading conditions were selected in order to reproduce the same stress state found in previous mechanical failure tests. Preloading and functional loading conditions were simulated. The analysis of the numerical results shows that the structure yielding is due to the fixture neck plastic deformation, that increases the load eccentricity and then the bending stress on the connecting screw. Only slight differences were found between the three implant systems in the amount and distribution of stress. The model reproduces properly the implant systems and the experimental set-up. The goodness of the model can be summarised as: realistic geometrical structure, elastoplastic model for the material description, correct definition of the contacts and the existing tolerance among the different system components, reproduction of the preloading stress condition. The present study permitted to define a valid procedure for the realization of numerical models of implant systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10255840310001646301DOI Listing
August 2004

Contact stresses and fatigue life in a knee prosthesis: comparison between in vitro measurements and computational simulations.

J Biomech 2004 Jan;37(1):45-53

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Strutturale and Dipartimento di Bioingegneria, Laboratory of Biological Structure Mechanics, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milano 20133, Italy.

The evaluation of contact areas and pressures in total knee prosthesis is a key issue to prevent early failure. The first part of this study is based on the hypothesis that the patterns of contact stresses on the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis at different stages of the gait cycle could be an indicator of the wear performances of a knee prosthesis. Contact stresses were calculated for a mobile bearing knee prosthesis by means of finite element method (FEM). Contact areas and stresses were also measured through in vitro tests using Fuji Prescale film in order to support the FEM findings. The second part of this study addresses the long-term structural integrity of metal tibial components in terms of fatigue life by means of experimental tests and FEM simulations. Fatigue experimental evaluations were performed on Cr-Co alloy tibial tray, based on ISO standards. FEM models were used to calculate the stress patterns. The failure risk was estimated with a standard fatigue criterion on the basis of the results obtained from the FEM calculations. Experimental and computational results showed a positive matching.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0021-9290(03)00255-0DOI Listing
January 2004
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