Publications by authors named "Daphne Lo"

6 Publications

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Lessons From Learners: Adapting Medical Student Education During and Post-COVID-19.

Acad Med 2021 May 4. Epub 2021 May 4.

M.R.H. Castro is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California; ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2085-4893. L.M. Calthorpe is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California; ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0496-9471. S.E. Fogh is associate professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. S. McAllister is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. C.L Johnson is a third-year medical student, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. E.D. Isaacs is professor of emergency medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. A. Ishizaki is manager, Clinical Microsystems Clerkship, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. A. Kozas is curriculum coordinator, Clinical Microsystems Clerkship, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. D. Lo is assistant professor of medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine; and Department of Geriatrics and Extended Care, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, California. S. Rennke is professor of medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. J. Davis is professor of medicine and associate dean for curriculum, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. A. Chang is professor of medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many medical schools suspended clinical clerkships and implemented newly adapted curricula to facilitate continued educational progress. While the implementation of these new curricula has been described, an understanding of the impact on student learning outcomes is lacking. In 2020, the authors followed Kern's 6-step approach to curricular development to create and evaluate a novel COVID-19 curriculum for medical students at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine and evaluate its learning outcomes. The primary goal of the curriculum was to provide third- and fourth-year medical students an opportunity for workplace learning in the absence of clinical clerkships, specifically for students to develop clerkship-level milestones in the competency domains of practice-based learning and improvement, professionalism, and systems-based practice. The curriculum was designed to match students with faculty-mentored projects occurring primarily in virtual formats. A total of 126 students enrolled in the curriculum and completed a survey about their learning outcomes (100% response rate). Of 35 possible clerkship-level milestones, there were 12 milestones for which over half of students reported development, in competency domains including practice-based learning and improvement, professionalism, and interpersonal and communication skills. Thematic analysis of students' qualitative survey responses demonstrated 2 central motivations for participating in the curriculum: identity as physicians-in-training, and patient engagement. Six central learning areas were developed during the curriculum: interprofessional teamwork, community resources, technology in medicine, skill-building, quality improvement, and specialty-specific learning. This analysis demonstrates that students can develop competencies and achieve rich workplace learning through project-based experiential learning, even in virtual clinical workplaces. Furthermore, knowledge of community resources, technology in medicine, and quality improvement were developed through the curriculum more readily than in traditional clerkships, and could be considered as integral learning objectives in future curricular design.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004148DOI Listing
May 2021

The Adoption of Video Visits During the COVID-19 Pandemic by VA Home Based Primary Care.

J Am Geriatr Soc 2021 02 21;69(2):318-320. Epub 2020 Dec 21.

Geriatrics, Palliative, and Extended Care, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.16982DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8011851PMC
February 2021

Caregiving in heart failure: relationship quality is associated with caregiver benefit finding and caregiver burden.

Heart Lung 2014 Jul-Aug;43(4):306-10

Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine and College of Nursing, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA; Colorado Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (CCOR), Denver, CO, USA.

Objective: To determine whether relationship quality is associated with caregiver benefit or burden and how depression influences these associations.

Background: Caregivers influence outcomes of patients with heart failure (HF). Relationship quality, caregiver benefit and burden are key factors in the caregiving experience.

Methods: Nineteen caregivers of HF outpatients completed measures of relationship quality, caregiver benefit, burden and depression. Associations were assessed using Pearson's correlations.

Results: Relationship quality was positively associated with caregiver benefit (r = 0.45, P = 0.05) and negatively associated with burden (r = -0.80, P < 0.0001) and depression (r = -0.77, P = 0.0001). Relationship quality and burden remained associated after controlling for depression.

Conclusions: In this exploratory study, relationship quality was positively associated with caregiver benefit and negatively associated with burden. Future studies are needed to further understand these key caregiving factors, which may lead to opportunities to help caregivers see benefits and reduce burden.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2014.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5711727PMC
August 2014

Use of memantine for the treatment of dementia.

Expert Rev Neurother 2011 Oct;11(10):1359-70

Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, 1438 S Grand Blvd, St Louis, MO 63104, USA.

The term 'dementia' encompasses a number of neurodegenerative diseases of which Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common. Prior to 2003, cholinesterase inhibitors, such as donezepil, were the only class of drugs approved to treat mild-to-moderate AD. In 2003, memantine became the first drug approved by the US FDA to treat moderate-to-severe AD. Currently, both memantine and donepezil are FDA approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe AD. This article examines the pharmacologic profile of memantine, evidence for memantine's efficacy in moderate-to-severe AD and other dementias, its novel use in other neuropsychiatric disorders and future implications and research directions for memantine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/ern.11.132DOI Listing
October 2011