Publications by authors named "Danielle White"

16 Publications

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Healthy Uses for Garlic.

Authors:
Danielle White

Nurs Clin North Am 2021 03;56(1):153-156

School of Nursing, Austin Peay State University, McCord, Room 218, P.O. Box 4658, Clarksville, TN 37044, USA. Electronic address:

Garlic originated in West China and has been used for its health qualities since 2600 bc. Garlic was brought to Great Britain in 1548 from the Mediterranean Sea. Early uses of garlic were to treat gastric infections, fevers, and diarrhea. Fresh garlic has the most health benefits through the compound allicin. Health benefits of garlic include the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, antioxidant effects, antimicrobial effects, and reduction of cancer risks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2020.12.001DOI Listing
March 2021

Embedding public health advocacy into the role of school-based nurses: addressing the health inequities confronted by vulnerable Australian children and adolescent populations.

Aust J Prim Health 2020 Dec 3. Epub 2020 Dec 3.

There has been a growth in Australian school-based nurses to address the inequities confronted by vulnerable students and school populations. Failure to address inequities can be evidenced in intergenerational poverty, poorer health and educational attainment and diminished life opportunities. School-based nurses are ideally located to advocate for public health policies and programs that address social determinants that detrimentally affect the health of school populations. However, school-based nurses can confront professional and speciality challenges in extending their efforts beyond individual student advocacy to effect change at the school population level. Guidance is required to redress this situation. This paper describes public health advocacy, the professional and speciality advocacy roles of school-based nurses and the barriers they confront in advocating for the health of school populations and strategies that can be used by key stakeholders to enhance school-based nursing public health advocacy efforts. School-based nurses who are competent, enabled and supported public health advocates are required if we are to achieve substantial and sustained health equity and social justice outcomes for vulnerable school populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY20155DOI Listing
December 2020

The case for integrated health and community literacy to achieve transformational community engagement and improved health outcomes: an inclusive approach to addressing rural and remote health inequities and community healthcare expectations.

Prim Health Care Res Dev 2020 12 2;21:e57. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Team Leader, Coomealla Health Aboriginal Corporation, Coomealla, Australia.

Context: Despite the substantial investment by Australian health authorities to improve the health of rural and remote communities, rural residents continue to experience health care access challenges and poorer health outcomes. Health literacy and community engagement are both considered critical in addressing these health inequities. However, the current focus on health literacy can place undue burdens of responsibility for healthcare on individuals from disadvantaged communities whilst not taking due account of broader community needs and healthcare expectations. This can also marginalize the influence of community solidarity and mobilization in effecting healthcare improvements.

Objective: The objective is to present a conceptual framework that describes community literacy, its alignment with health literacy, and its relationship to concepts of community engaged healthcare.

Findings: Community literacy aims to integrate community knowledge, skills and resources into the design, delivery and adaptation of healthcare policies, and services at regional and local levels, with the provision of primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare that aligns to individual community contexts. A set of principles is proposed to support the development of community literacy. Three levels of community literacy education for health personnel have been described that align with those applied to health literacy for consumers. It is proposed that community literacy education can facilitate transformational community engagement. Skills acquired by health personnel from senior executives to frontline clinical staff, can also lead to enhanced opportunities to promote health literacy for individuals.

Conclusions: The integration of health and community literacy provides a holistic framework that has the potential to effectively respond to the diversity of rural and remote Australian communities and their healthcare needs and expectations. Further research is required to develop, validate, and evaluate the three levels of community literacy education and alignment to health policy, prior to promoting its uptake more widely.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1463423620000481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7737170PMC
December 2020

Bleeding diathesis in the older population.

Age Ageing 2021 02;50(2):595

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afaa216DOI Listing
February 2021

Evaluation of COVID-19 coagulopathy; laboratory characterization using thrombin generation and nonconventional haemostasis assays.

Int J Lab Hematol 2021 Feb 5;43(1):123-130. Epub 2020 Sep 5.

Department of Haematology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, UK.

Introduction: Patients with COVID-19 are known to have a coagulopathy with a thrombosis risk. It is unknown whether this is due to a generalized humoral prothrombotic state or endothelial factors such as inflammation and dysfunction. The aim was to further characterize thrombin generation using a novel analyser (ST Genesia, Diagnostica Stago, Asnières, France) and a panel of haematological analytes in patients with COVID-19.

Methods: Platelet poor plasma of 34 patients with noncritical COVID-19 was compared with 75 patients with critical COVID-19 (as defined by WHO criteria) in a retrospective study by calibrated automated thrombography and ELISA. Patients were matched for baseline characteristics of age and gender.

Results: Critical patients had significantly increased fibrinogen, CRP, interleukin-6 and D-dimer compared to noncritical patients. Thrombin generation, in critical patients, was right shifted without significant differences in peak, velocity index or endogenous thrombin potential. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly increased in the critical versus noncritical patients. Critically ill patients were on haemodiafiltration (31%; heparin used in the circuit) or often received escalated prophylactic low-molecular weight heparin.

Conclusion: These results confirm increased fibrinogen and D-dimer in critical COVID-19-infected patients. Importantly, disease severity did not increase thrombin generation (including thrombin-antithrombin complexes and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2) when comparing both cohorts; counter-intuitively critical patients were hypocoaguable. tPA, TFPI and VEGF were increased in critical patients, which are hypothesized to reflect endothelial dysfunction and/or contribution of heparin (which may cause endothelial TFPI/tPA release).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijlh.13329DOI Listing
February 2021

Diagnostic work up of patients with increased bleeding tendency: Comment.

Haemophilia 2020 Jul 20;26(4):e209-e210. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Haemostasis and Thrombosis Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hae.13989DOI Listing
July 2020

Investigation of patients with unclassified bleeding disorder and abnormal thrombin generation for physiological coagulation inhibitors reveals multiple abnormalities and a subset of patients with increased tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity.

Int J Lab Hematol 2020 Jun 31;42(3):246-255. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Department of Haematology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.

Introduction: We have routinely used thrombin generation to investigate patients with unclassified bleeding disorder (UBD).

Aims: To investigate haemostatic abnormalities in patients with UBD that had abnormal thrombin generation on at least one occasion.

Methods: Investigation of 13 known UBD patients with thrombin generation and detailed haemostatic testing was undertaken including TFPI assays but also thrombomodulin and fibrinogen-γ.

Results: 12 females and 1 male were included. No patient had a platelet function disorder or coagulation factor deficiency that explained the bleeding phenotype, though 2 patients had factor deficiencies; a factor X of 0.41 IU/mL and a factor XI of 0.51 IU/mL. ThromboGenomics revealed variants for these factors but no other abnormalities. Patients were included who previously had either prolonged lag time or decreased endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) via high dose tissue factor (5 pmol/L) or low dose tissue factor (1.5 pmol/L) with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI). Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) activity was significantly increased (P < .001; increased in 8 patients) compared with controls and abnormalities in soluble thrombomodulin (2 patients), fibrinogen-γ (1 patient) and tPA (4 patients for each) were seen. Total and free TFPI levels were not increased. Mixing studies of patient plasma with 50:50 normal plasma for thrombin generation via low dose tissue factor failed to correct the ETP consistent with ongoing inhibition. Addition of an anti-TFPI antibody partially corrected thrombin generation to normal levels. TFPI sequencing was unremarkable.

Conclusion: TFPI activity may be increased in a subset of UBD patients. Further research studies are warranted in UBD patients for coagulation inhibitor abnormalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijlh.13155DOI Listing
June 2020

Eμ-TCL1xMyc: A Novel Mouse Model for Concurrent CLL and B-Cell Lymphoma.

Clin Cancer Res 2019 10 11;25(20):6260-6273. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Division of Hematology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Purpose: Aberrant Myc expression is a major factor in the pathogenesis of aggressive lymphoma, and these lymphomas, while clinically heterogeneous, often are resistant to currently available treatments and have poor survival. Myc expression can also be seen in aggressive lymphomas that are observed in the context of CLL, and we sought to develop a mouse model that could be used to study therapeutic strategies for aggressive lymphoma in the context of CLL.

Experimental Design: We crossed the Eμ-TCL1 mouse model with the Eμ-Myc mouse model to investigate the clinical phenotype associated with B-cell-restricted expression of these oncogenes. The resulting malignancy was then extensively characterized, from both a clinical and biologic perspective.

Results: Eμ-TCL1xMyc mice uniformly developed highly aggressive lymphoid disease with histologically, immunophenotypically, and molecularly distinct concurrent CLL and B-cell lymphoma, leading to a significantly reduced lifespan. Injection of cells from diseased Eμ-TCL1xMyc into WT mice established a disease similar to that in the double-transgenic mice. Both Eμ-TCL1xMyc mice and mice with disease after adoptive transfer failed to respond to ibrutinib. Effective and durable disease control was, however, observed by selective inhibition of nuclear export protein exportin-1 (XPO1) using a compound currently in clinical development for relapsed/refractory malignancies, including CLL and lymphoma.

Conclusions: The Eμ-TCL1xMyc mouse is a new preclinical tool for testing experimental drugs for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, including in the context of CLL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-19-0273DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6801062PMC
October 2019

Pharmacologic Interventions for Pain Management.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2017 Dec 5;29(4):427-447. Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Austin Peay State University, School of Nursing, PO Box 4658, Clarksville, TN 37043, USA.

Serious life-threatening respiratory depression may occur with pharmacologic pain intervention. The nurse has an ethical and legal duty to provide safe, quality, and accountable pain management. The nurse must acquire self-efficacy for the administration of pain medications for critically ill patients to prevent serious side effects and adverse reactions. This article presents a clinical toolkit for acute pain pharmacologic management by presenting professional guidelines, evidence-based pain assessment tools, common pain medication therapy, and focused monitoring specific to the drug. Medical adjustments owing to special populations is also discussed. Case reports demonstrate application of clinical reasoning skills needed for pain management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2017.08.004DOI Listing
December 2017

Coaching in self-efficacy improves care responses, health and well-being in dementia carers: a pre/post-test/follow-up study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2016 05 4;16:166. Epub 2016 May 4.

Westmead Hospital, 166-174 Darcy Road, Westmead, NSW, 2145, Australia.

Background: Maintaining the health and well-being of family carers of people with dementia is vital, given their potential for experiencing burden associated with the role. The study aimed to help dementia carers develop self-efficacy, be less hassled by the caring role and improve their health and well-being with goal-directed behaviour, by participating in an eight module carer coaching program.

Methods: The study used mixed methods in a pre/post-test/follow-up design over 24 months, with assignment of consented dementia carers to either individualised (n = 16) or group coaching (n = 32), or usual carer support services (n = 43), depending on preference. Care-giving self-efficacy and hassles, carer health, well-being and goal-directed behaviours were assessed over time. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to compare changes over time and the effects of coaching on carer self-efficacy, hassles and health, using the Univariate General Linear Model (GLM).

Results: All carers were hassled by many aspects of caring at baseline. Participants receiving coaching reported non-significant improvements in most areas of self-efficacy for caring, hassles associated with caring and self-reported health at post-test and follow-up, than did carers receiving usual carer support. Group coaching had greater success in helping carers to achieve their goals and to seek help from informal and formal support networks and services.

Conclusion: The study outcomes were generally positive, but need to be interpreted cautiously, given some methodological limitations. It has been shown, however, that health staff can assist dementia carers to develop self-efficacy in better managing their family member's limitations and behaviour, seek help from others and attend to their health. Teaching carers to use goal-directed behaviour may help them achieve these outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-016-1410-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4855813PMC
May 2016

Aging population.

Nurs Clin North Am 2015 Mar;50(1):185-213

School of Nursing, Austin Peay State University, PO Box 4658, Clarksville, TN 37044, USA.

Our aging population is rapidly growing and accounts for 46% of critical care patients and 60% of medical-surgical patients in the hospital. These acutely ill patients are challenging to frontline nurses because they frequently have multiple chronic conditions. This article provides a tool kit of resources and clinical skills to develop safe, quality, and accountable care plans for positive patient outcomes; it presents several resources to assist in individualized care, the complexity of care, and the issues of transitions of care. This article empowers frontline nurses to develop gerontological skills and meet the unique needs of our aging population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2014.10.014DOI Listing
March 2015

Interprofessional collaborative care skills for the frontline nurse.

Nurs Clin North Am 2015 Mar 23;50(1):59-73. Epub 2014 Dec 23.

School of Nursing, Austin Peay State University, 601 College Street, Clarksville, TN 37044, USA.

Patients in the hospital setting are acutely ill and many have complications from chronic illnesses. Their care is complex and reimbursed on a value-based payment system. Quality indicators for reimbursement are evidence-based benchmarks that must be met for full financial reimbursement. High-functioning interprofessional collaborative care is required for patients to have positive outcomes and for achievement of high scores on patient satisfaction surveys. This article overviews the charge for transformation, explains the concept of interprofessional collaborative care, provides examples of interdisciplinary teams in practice for application, and provides resources to improve collaborative care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2014.10.005DOI Listing
March 2015

Real-time resolution of point mutations that cause phenovariance in mice.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2015 Feb 20;112(5):E440-9. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Center for the Genetics of Host Defense, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390;

With the wide availability of massively parallel sequencing technologies, genetic mapping has become the rate limiting step in mammalian forward genetics. Here we introduce a method for real-time identification of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutations that cause phenotypes in mice. All mutations are identified by whole exome G1 progenitor sequencing and their zygosity is established in G2/G3 mice before phenotypic assessment. Quantitative and qualitative traits, including lethal effects, in single or multiple combined pedigrees are then analyzed with Linkage Analyzer, a software program that detects significant linkage between individual mutations and aberrant phenotypic scores and presents processed data as Manhattan plots. As multiple alleles of genes are acquired through mutagenesis, pooled "superpedigrees" are created to analyze the effects. Our method is distinguished from conventional forward genetic methods because it permits (1) unbiased declaration of mappable phenotypes, including those that are incompletely penetrant (2), automated identification of causative mutations concurrent with phenotypic screening, without the need to outcross mutant mice to another strain and backcross them, and (3) exclusion of genes not involved in phenotypes of interest. We validated our approach and Linkage Analyzer for the identification of 47 mutations in 45 previously known genes causative for adaptive immune phenotypes; our analysis also implicated 474 genes not previously associated with immune function. The method described here permits forward genetic analysis in mice, limited only by the rates of mutant production and screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1423216112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321302PMC
February 2015

p38(MAPK): stress responses from molecular mechanisms to therapeutics.

Trends Mol Med 2009 Aug 6;15(8):369-79. Epub 2009 Aug 6.

NIHR - Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, LS9 7TF, UK.

The p38(MAPK) protein kinases affect a variety of intracellular responses, with well-recognized roles in inflammation, cell-cycle regulation, cell death, development, differentiation, senescence and tumorigenesis. In this review, we examine the regulatory and effector components of this pathway, focusing on their emerging roles in biological processes involved in different pathologies. We summarize how this pathway has been exploited for the development of therapeutics and discuss the potential obstacles of targeting this promiscuous protein kinase pathway for the treatment of different diseases. Furthermore, we discuss how the p38(MAPK) pathway might be best exploited for the development of more effective therapeutics with minimal side effects in a range of specific disease settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molmed.2009.06.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3016890PMC
August 2009

BAY 11-7082 induces cell death through NF-kappaB-independent mechanisms in the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours.

Cancer Lett 2008 Sep 8;268(2):212-24. Epub 2008 May 8.

Candlelighter's Children's Cancer Research Group, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK.

The role of NF-kappaB in the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT) and their response to fenretinide has been investigated. Basal levels of phosphorylated NF-kappaB were low in all ESFT cells. BAY 11-7082 decreased cell viability, which was accompanied by caspase-3 cleavage. This was independent of the increase in reactive oxygen species, p38(MAPK) phosphorylation and expression of NF-kappaB target proteins. NF-kappaB knockdown did not induce death under normal growth conditions, but did reduce TNFalpha-dependent cell survival. Fenretinide-induced apoptosis was independent of NF-kappaB. BAY 11-7082-induced cell death through an NF-kappaB-independent mechanism and enhanced cell death when combined with fenretinide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2008.03.045DOI Listing
September 2008

The role of plasma fatty acid composition in endogenous glucose production in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Metabolism 2002 Nov;51(11):1471-7

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

Hepatic insulin resistance and increased endogenous glucose production (EGP) are associated with increased plasma free fatty acids (FFA). However, the contribution of FFA composition to the regulation of EGP is not known. Six obese nondiabetic subjects and 6 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) were studied after an overnight and a 3-day fast. Plasma insulin concentrations after an overnight fast were similar in the DM2 and nondiabetic patients (88.8 +/- 26.4 v 57.6 +/- 12.6 pmol/L, not significant [NS]) despite increased plasma glucose (9.9 +/- 1.8 v 5.1 +/- 0.1 mmol/L, P <.01) and EGP (510.3 +/- 77.7 v 298.3 +/- 18.3 micromol x m(-2) x min(-1), P <.05) in the patients with DM2. Absolute rates of gluconeogenesis using the heavy water method were also increased in the patients with DM2 (346.8 +/- 74.9 v 198.8 +/- 16.4 micromol x m(-2). min(-1), P <.05). No differences were observed in plasma polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) between the diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. However, total saturated fatty acid (SFA) concentrations (350 +/- 37.4 v 230.9 +/- 33.3 micromol/L, P <.02) were significantly increased in the diabetic subjects. Rates of EGP were correlated with total plasma FFA concentration (r =.71, P <.01) and the concentration of SFA (r =.71, P <.01), but not monounsaturated fatty acids or PUFA. Rates of gluconeogenesis were also correlated with plasma FFA (r =.64, P <.05) and SFA (r =.67, P <.05). We observed no relationship between EGP and either total FFA or fatty acid composition after a 3-day fast. We conclude that increases in EGP are associated with concentrations of plasma SFA after an overnight fast.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/meta.2002.35202DOI Listing
November 2002