Publications by authors named "Daniele Campa"

143 Publications

Association of Genetic Variants Affecting microRNAs and Pancreatic Cancer Risk.

Front Genet 2021 30;12:693933. Epub 2021 Aug 30.

Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Children's Hospital, Florence, Italy.

Genetic factors play an important role in the susceptibility to pancreatic cancer (PC). However, established loci explain a small proportion of genetic heritability for PC; therefore, more progress is needed to find the missing ones. We aimed at identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting PC risk through effects on micro-RNA (miRNA) function. We searched the genome for SNPs in miRNA seed sequences or 3 prime untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of miRNA target genes. Genome-wide association data of PC cases and controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort (PanScan) Consortium and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortium were re-analyzed for discovery, and genotyping data from two additional consortia (PanGenEU and PANDoRA) were used for replication, for a total of 14,062 cases and 11,261 controls. None of the SNPs reached genome-wide significance in the meta-analysis, but for three of them the associations were in the same direction in all the study populations and showed lower value of in the meta-analyses than in the discovery phase. Specifically, rs7985480 was consistently associated with PC risk (OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.07-1.17, = 3.03 × 10 in the meta-analysis). This SNP is in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs2274048, which modulates binding of various miRNAs to the 3'UTR of , a gene involved in PC progression. In conclusion, our results expand the knowledge of the genetic PC risk through miRNA-related SNPs and show the usefulness of functional prioritization to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with PC risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2021.693933DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8435735PMC
August 2021

Genetic polymorphisms involved in mitochondrial metabolism and pancreatic cancer risk.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 Sep 15. Epub 2021 Sep 15.

Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza.

Background: The mitochondrial metabolism has been associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) risk. Recent evidence also suggests the involvement of the genetic variability of the mitochondrial function in several traits involved in PDAC aetiology. However, a systematic investigation of the genetic variability of mitochondrial genome (mtSNPs) and of all the nuclear genes involved in its functioning (n-mtSNPs) has never been reported.

Methods: We conducted a two-phase association study of mtSNPs and n-mtSNPs to assess their effect on PDAC risk. We analysed 35,297 n-mtSNPs and 101 mtSNPs in up to 55,870 individuals (12,884 PDAC cases and 42,986 controls). In addition, we also conducted a gene-based analysis on 1,588 genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism using MAGMA software.

Results: In the discovery phase we identified 49 n-mtSNPs and no mtSNPs associated with PDAC risk (P <0.05). In the second phase none of the findings were replicated. In the gene-level analysiswe observed that three genes (TERT, SUGCT and SURF1) involved in the mitochondrial metabolismshowed an association below the Bonferroni-corrected threshold of statistical significance (P=0.05/1588=3.1 x10-5).

Conclusions: Even though the mitochondrial metabolism might be involved in PDAC aetiology, our results, obtained in a study with one of the largest sample sizes to date, show that neither n-mtSNPs nor mtSNPs are associated with PDAC risk.

Impact: This large case-control study does not support a role of the genetic variability of the mitochondrial function in PDAC risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-21-0353DOI Listing
September 2021

Association of germline genetic variants with breast cancer-specific survival in patient subgroups defined by clinic-pathological variables related to tumor biology and type of systemic treatment.

Breast Cancer Res 2021 Aug 18;23(1):86. Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Department of Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Background: Given the high heterogeneity among breast tumors, associations between common germline genetic variants and survival that may exist within specific subgroups could go undetected in an unstratified set of breast cancer patients.

Methods: We performed genome-wide association analyses within 15 subgroups of breast cancer patients based on prognostic factors, including hormone receptors, tumor grade, age, and type of systemic treatment. Analyses were based on 91,686 female patients of European ancestry from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, including 7531 breast cancer-specific deaths over a median follow-up of 8.1 years. Cox regression was used to assess associations of common germline variants with 15-year and 5-year breast cancer-specific survival. We assessed the probability of these associations being true positives via the Bayesian false discovery probability (BFDP < 0.15).

Results: Evidence of associations with breast cancer-specific survival was observed in three patient subgroups, with variant rs5934618 in patients with grade 3 tumors (15-year-hazard ratio (HR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] 1.32 [1.20, 1.45], P = 1.4E-08, BFDP = 0.01, per G allele); variant rs4679741 in patients with ER-positive tumors treated with endocrine therapy (15-year-HR [95% CI] 1.18 [1.11, 1.26], P = 1.6E-07, BFDP = 0.09, per G allele); variants rs1106333 (15-year-HR [95% CI] 1.68 [1.39,2.03], P = 5.6E-08, BFDP = 0.12, per A allele) and rs78754389 (5-year-HR [95% CI] 1.79 [1.46,2.20], P = 1.7E-08, BFDP = 0.07, per A allele), in patients with ER-negative tumors treated with chemotherapy.

Conclusions: We found evidence of four loci associated with breast cancer-specific survival within three patient subgroups. There was limited evidence for the existence of associations in other patient subgroups. However, the power for many subgroups is limited due to the low number of events. Even so, our results suggest that the impact of common germline genetic variants on breast cancer-specific survival might be limited.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13058-021-01450-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8371820PMC
August 2021

Mendelian randomisation study of smoking exposure in relation to breast cancer risk.

Br J Cancer 2021 Aug 2. Epub 2021 Aug 2.

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Background: Despite a modest association between tobacco smoking and breast cancer risk reported by recent epidemiological studies, it is still equivocal whether smoking is causally related to breast cancer risk.

Methods: We applied Mendelian randomisation (MR) to evaluate a potential causal effect of cigarette smoking on breast cancer risk. Both individual-level data as well as summary statistics for 164 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reported in genome-wide association studies of lifetime smoking index (LSI) or cigarette per day (CPD) were used to obtain MR effect estimates. Data from 108,420 invasive breast cancer cases and 87,681 controls were used for the LSI analysis and for the CPD analysis conducted among ever-smokers from 26,147 cancer cases and 26,072 controls. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to address pleiotropy.

Results: Genetically predicted LSI was associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR 1.18 per SD, 95% CI: 1.07-1.30, P = 0.11 × 10), but there was no evidence of association for genetically predicted CPD (OR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.78-1.19, P = 0.85). The sensitivity analyses yielded similar results and showed no strong evidence of pleiotropic effect.

Conclusion: Our MR study provides supportive evidence for a potential causal association with breast cancer risk for lifetime smoking exposure but not cigarettes per day among smokers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-021-01432-8DOI Listing
August 2021

Associations between pancreatic expression quantitative traits and risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Carcinogenesis 2021 Aug;42(8):1037-1045

Department of Gastroenterology and Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the most lethal cancers. Its poor prognosis is predominantly due to the fact that most patients remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage, alongside the lack of early markers and screening strategies. A better understanding of PDAC risk factors is essential for the identification of groups at high risk in the population. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a powerful tool for detecting genetic variants associated with complex traits, including pancreatic cancer. By exploiting functional and GWAS data, we investigated the associations between polymorphisms affecting gene function in the pancreas (expression quantitative trait loci, eQTLs) and PDAC risk. In a two-phase approach, we analysed 13 713 PDAC cases and 43 784 controls and identified a genome-wide significant association between the A allele of the rs2035875 polymorphism and increased PDAC risk (P = 7.14 × 10-10). This allele is known to be associated with increased expression in the pancreas of the keratin genes KRT8 and KRT18, whose increased levels have been reported to correlate with various tumour cell characteristics. Additionally, the A allele of the rs789744 variant was associated with decreased risk of developing PDAC (P = 3.56 × 10-6). This single nucleotide polymorphism is situated in the SRGAP1 gene and the A allele is associated with higher expression of the gene, which in turn inactivates the cyclin-dependent protein 42 (CDC42) gene expression, thus decreasing the risk of PDAC. In conclusion, we present here a functional-based novel PDAC risk locus and an additional strong candidate supported by significant associations and plausible biological mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgab057DOI Listing
August 2021

Functional annotation of the 2q35 breast cancer risk locus implicates a structural variant in influencing activity of a long-range enhancer element.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 07 18;108(7):1190-1203. Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany.

A combination of genetic and functional approaches has identified three independent breast cancer risk loci at 2q35. A recent fine-scale mapping analysis to refine these associations resulted in 1 (signal 1), 5 (signal 2), and 42 (signal 3) credible causal variants at these loci. We used publicly available in silico DNase I and ChIP-seq data with in vitro reporter gene and CRISPR assays to annotate signals 2 and 3. We identified putative regulatory elements that enhanced cell-type-specific transcription from the IGFBP5 promoter at both signals (30- to 40-fold increased expression by the putative regulatory element at signal 2, 2- to 3-fold by the putative regulatory element at signal 3). We further identified one of the five credible causal variants at signal 2, a 1.4 kb deletion (esv3594306), as the likely causal variant; the deletion allele of this variant was associated with an average additional increase in IGFBP5 expression of 1.3-fold (MCF-7) and 2.2-fold (T-47D). We propose a model in which the deletion allele of esv3594306 juxtaposes two transcription factor binding regions (annotated by estrogen receptor alpha ChIP-seq peaks) to generate a single extended regulatory element. This regulatory element increases cell-type-specific expression of the tumor suppressor gene IGFBP5 and, thereby, reduces risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% CI 0.74-0.81, p = 3.1 × 10).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.05.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8322933PMC
July 2021

Telomere Length and Male Fertility.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Apr 12;22(8). Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy.

Over the past decade, telomeres have attracted increasing attention due to the role they play in human fertility. However, conflicting results have been reported on the possible association between sperm telomere length (STL) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and the quality of the sperm parameters. The aim of this study was to run a comprehensive study to investigate the role of STL and LTL in male spermatogenesis and infertility. Moreover, the association between the sperm parameters and 11 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified in the literature for their association with telomere length (TL), was investigated. We observed no associations between sperm parameters and STL nor LTL. For the individual SNPs, we observed five statistically significant associations with sperm parameters: considering a < 0.05. Namely, -rs11125529 and decreased sperm motility ( = 0.03); -rs6772228 with a lower sperm count ( = 0.02); -rs7675998 with increased probability of having abnormal acrosomes ( = 0.03) and abnormal flagellum ( = 0.04); -rs8105767 and reduction of sperms with normal heads ( = 0.009). This study suggests a moderate involvement of telomere length in male fertility; however, in our analyses four SNPs were weakly associated with sperm variables, suggesting the SNPs to be pleiotropic and involved in other regulatory mechanisms independent of telomere homeostasis, but involved in the spermatogenic process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22083959DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8069448PMC
April 2021

Genetically determined telomere length and multiple myeloma risk and outcome.

Blood Cancer J 2021 Apr 14;11(4):74. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Department of Hematology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

Telomeres are involved in processes like cellular growth, chromosomal stability, and proper segregation to daughter cells. Telomere length measured in leukocytes (LTL) has been investigated in different cancer types, including multiple myeloma (MM). However, LTL measurement is prone to heterogeneity due to sample handling and study design (retrospective vs. prospective). LTL is genetically determined; genome-wide association studies identified 11 SNPs that, combined in a score, can be used as a genetic instrument to measure LTL and evaluate its association with MM risk. This approach has been already successfully attempted in various cancer types but never in MM. We tested the "teloscore" in 2407 MM patients and 1741 controls from the International Multiple Myeloma rESEarch (IMMeNSE) consortium. We observed an increased risk for longer genetically determined telomere length (gdTL) (OR = 1.69; 95% CI 1.36-2.11; P = 2.97 × 10 for highest vs. lowest quintile of the score). Furthermore, in a subset of 1376 MM patients we tested the relationship between the teloscore and MM patients survival, observing a better prognosis for longer gdTL compared with shorter gdTL (HR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.86-0.99; P = 0.049). In conclusion, we report convincing evidence that longer gdTL is a risk marker for MM risk, and that it is potentially involved in increasing MM survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41408-021-00462-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8046773PMC
April 2021

Lack of association of CD44-rs353630 and CHI3L2-rs684559 with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma survival.

Sci Rep 2021 Apr 7;11(1):7570. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Via Derna 1, 56126, Pisa, Italy.

Although pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) survival is poor, there are differences in patients' response to the treatments. Detection of predictive biomarkers explaining these differences is of the utmost importance. In a recent study two genetic markers (CD44-rs353630 and CHI3L2-rs684559) were reported to be associated with survival after PDAC resection. We attempted to replicate the associations in 1856 PDAC patients (685 resected with stage I/II) from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We also analysed the combined effect of the two genotypes in order to compare our results with what was previously reported. Additional stratified analyses considering TNM stage of the disease and whether the patients received surgery were also performed. We observed no statistically significant associations, except for the heterozygous carriers of CD44-rs353630, who were associated with worse OS (HR = 5.01; 95% CI 1.58-15.88; p = 0.006) among patients with stage I disease. This association is in the opposite direction of those reported previously, suggesting that data obtained in such small subgroups are hardly replicable and should be considered cautiously. The two polymorphisms combined did not show any statistically significant association. Our results suggest that the effect of CD44-rs353630 and CHI3L2-rs684559 cannot be generalized to all PDAC patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-87130-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8027406PMC
April 2021

Expression quantitative trait loci of genes predicting outcome are associated with survival of multiple myeloma patients.

Int J Cancer 2021 07 30;149(2):327-336. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Gene expression profiling can be used for predicting survival in multiple myeloma (MM) and identifying patients who will benefit from particular types of therapy. Some germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) act as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) showing strong associations with gene expression levels. We performed an association study to test whether eQTLs of genes reported to be associated with prognosis of MM patients are directly associated with measures of adverse outcome. Using the genotype-tissue expression portal, we identified a total of 16 candidate genes with at least one eQTL SNP associated with their expression with P < 10 either in EBV-transformed B-lymphocytes or whole blood. We genotyped the resulting 22 SNPs in 1327 MM cases from the International Multiple Myeloma rESEarch (IMMEnSE) consortium and examined their association with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), adjusting for age, sex, country of origin and disease stage. Three polymorphisms in two genes (TBRG4-rs1992292, TBRG4-rs2287535 and ENTPD1-rs2153913) showed associations with OS at P < .05, with the former two also associated with PFS. The associations of two polymorphisms in TBRG4 with OS were replicated in 1277 MM cases from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology (InterLymph) Consortium. A meta-analysis of the data from IMMEnSE and InterLymph (2579 cases) showed that TBRG4-rs1992292 is associated with OS (hazard ratio = 1.14, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.26, P = .007). In conclusion, we found biologically a plausible association between a SNP in TBRG4 and OS of MM patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33547DOI Listing
July 2021

Polymorphic variants in Sweet and Umami taste receptor genes and birthweight.

Sci Rep 2021 Mar 2;11(1):4971. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

The first thousand days of life from conception have a significant impact on the health status with short, and long-term effects. Among several anthropometric and maternal lifestyle parameters birth weight plays a crucial role on the growth and neurological development of infants. Recent genome wide association studies (GWAS) have demonstrated a robust foetal and maternal genetic background of birth weight, however only a small proportion of the genetic hereditability has been already identified. Considering the extensive number of phenotypes on which they are involved, we focused on identifying the possible effect of genetic variants belonging to taste receptor genes and birthweight. In the human genome there are two taste receptors family the bitter receptors (TAS2Rs) and the sweet and umami receptors (TAS1Rs). In particular sweet perception is due to a heterodimeric receptor encoded by the TAS1R2 and the TAS1R3 gene, while the umami taste receptor is encoded by the TAS1R1 and the TAS1R3 genes. We observed that carriers of the T allele of the TAS1R1-rs4908932 SNPs showed an increase in birthweight compared to GG homozygotes Coeff: 87.40 (35.13-139.68) p-value = 0.001. The association remained significant after correction for multiple testing. TAS1R1-rs4908932 is a potentially functional SNP and is in linkage disequilibrium with another polymorphism that has been associated with BMI in adults showing the importance of this variant from the early stages of conception through all the adult life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-84491-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7925569PMC
March 2021

A case-only study to identify genetic modifiers of breast cancer risk for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Nat Commun 2021 02 17;12(1):1078. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.

Breast cancer (BC) risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers varies by genetic and familial factors. About 50 common variants have been shown to modify BC risk for mutation carriers. All but three, were identified in general population studies. Other mutation carrier-specific susceptibility variants may exist but studies of mutation carriers have so far been underpowered. We conduct a novel case-only genome-wide association study comparing genotype frequencies between 60,212 general population BC cases and 13,007 cases with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We identify robust novel associations for 2 variants with BC for BRCA1 and 3 for BRCA2 mutation carriers, P < 10, at 5 loci, which are not associated with risk in the general population. They include rs60882887 at 11p11.2 where MADD, SP11 and EIF1, genes previously implicated in BC biology, are predicted as potential targets. These findings will contribute towards customising BC polygenic risk scores for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20496-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7890067PMC
February 2021

Smoking Modifies Pancreatic Cancer Risk Loci on 2q21.3.

Cancer Res 2021 Jun 11;81(11):3134-3143. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Germline variation and smoking are independently associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We conducted genome-wide smoking interaction analysis of PDAC using genotype data from four previous genome-wide association studies in individuals of European ancestry (7,937 cases and 11,774 controls). Examination of expression quantitative trait loci data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project followed by colocalization analysis was conducted to determine whether there was support for common SNP(s) underlying the observed associations. Statistical tests were two sided and < 5 × 10 was considered statistically significant. Genome-wide significant evidence of qualitative interaction was identified on chr2q21.3 in intron 5 of the transmembrane protein 163 (TMEM163) and upstream of the cyclin T2 (CCNT2). The most significant SNP using the Empirical Bayes method, in this region that included 45 significantly associated SNPs, was rs1818613 [per allele OR in never smokers 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82-0.93; former smokers 1.00, 95% CI, 0.91-1.07; current smokers 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.40, = 3.08 × 10). Examination of the Genotype-Tissue Expression Project data demonstrated an expression quantitative trait locus in this region for TMEM163 and CCNT2 in several tissue types. Colocalization analysis supported a shared SNP, rs842357, in high linkage disequilibrium with rs1818613 ( = 0. 94) driving both the observed interaction and the expression quantitative trait loci signals. Future studies are needed to confirm and understand the differential biologic mechanisms by smoking status that contribute to our PDAC findings. SIGNIFICANCE: This large genome-wide interaction study identifies a susceptibility locus on 2q21.3 that significantly modified PDAC risk by smoking status, providing insight into smoking-associated PDAC, with implications for prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-20-3267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8178175PMC
June 2021

Genome-wide scan of long noncoding RNA single nucleotide polymorphisms and pancreatic cancer susceptibility.

Int J Cancer 2021 06 3;148(11):2779-2788. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is projected to become the second cancer-related cause of death by 2030. Identifying novel risk factors, including genetic risk loci, could be instrumental in risk stratification and implementation of prevention strategies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in regulation of key biological processes, and the possible role of their genetic variability has been unexplored so far. Combining genome wide association studies and functional data, we investigated the genetic variability in all lncRNAs. We analyzed 9893 PDAC cases and 9969 controls and identified a genome-wide significant association between the rs7046076 SNP and risk of developing PDAC (P = 9.73 × 10 ). This SNP is located in the NONHSAG053086.2 (lnc-SMC2-1) gene and the risk allele is predicted to disrupt the binding of the lncRNA with the micro-RNA (miRNA) hsa-mir-1256 that regulates several genes involved in cell cycle, such as CDKN2B. The CDKN2B region is pleiotropic and its genetic variants have been associated with several human diseases, possibly though an imperfect interaction between lncRNA and miRNA. We present a novel PDAC risk locus, supported by a genome-wide statistical significance and a plausible biological mechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33475DOI Listing
June 2021

Breast Cancer Risk Factors and Survival by Tumor Subtype: Pooled Analyses from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 04 26;30(4):623-642. Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Gynaecology Research Unit, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Background: It is not known whether modifiable lifestyle factors that predict survival after invasive breast cancer differ by subtype.

Methods: We analyzed data for 121,435 women diagnosed with breast cancer from 67 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium with 16,890 deaths (8,554 breast cancer specific) over 10 years. Cox regression was used to estimate associations between risk factors and 10-year all-cause mortality and breast cancer-specific mortality overall, by estrogen receptor (ER) status, and by intrinsic-like subtype.

Results: There was no evidence of heterogeneous associations between risk factors and mortality by subtype ( > 0.30). The strongest associations were between all-cause mortality and BMI ≥30 versus 18.5-25 kg/m [HR (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.19 (1.06-1.34)]; current versus never smoking [1.37 (1.27-1.47)], high versus low physical activity [0.43 (0.21-0.86)], age ≥30 years versus <20 years at first pregnancy [0.79 (0.72-0.86)]; >0-<5 years versus ≥10 years since last full-term birth [1.31 (1.11-1.55)]; ever versus never use of oral contraceptives [0.91 (0.87-0.96)]; ever versus never use of menopausal hormone therapy, including current estrogen-progestin therapy [0.61 (0.54-0.69)]. Similar associations with breast cancer mortality were weaker; for example, 1.11 (1.02-1.21) for current versus never smoking.

Conclusions: We confirm associations between modifiable lifestyle factors and 10-year all-cause mortality. There was no strong evidence that associations differed by ER status or intrinsic-like subtype.

Impact: Given the large dataset and lack of evidence that associations between modifiable risk factors and 10-year mortality differed by subtype, these associations could be cautiously used in prognostication models to inform patient-centered care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-0924DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8026532PMC
April 2021

CYP3A7*1C allele: linking premenopausal oestrone and progesterone levels with risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers.

Br J Cancer 2021 02 26;124(4):842-854. Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Molecular Epidemiology Group, C080, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence for a role of endogenous sex hormones in the aetiology of breast cancer. The aim of this analysis was to identify genetic variants that are associated with urinary sex-hormone levels and breast cancer risk.

Methods: We carried out a genome-wide association study of urinary oestrone-3-glucuronide and pregnanediol-3-glucuronide levels in 560 premenopausal women, with additional analysis of progesterone levels in 298 premenopausal women. To test for the association with breast cancer risk, we carried out follow-up genotyping in 90,916 cases and 89,893 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. All women were of European ancestry.

Results: For pregnanediol-3-glucuronide, there were no genome-wide significant associations; for oestrone-3-glucuronide, we identified a single peak mapping to the CYP3A locus, annotated by rs45446698. The minor rs45446698-C allele was associated with lower oestrone-3-glucuronide (-49.2%, 95% CI -56.1% to -41.1%, P = 3.1 × 10); in follow-up analyses, rs45446698-C was also associated with lower progesterone (-26.7%, 95% CI -39.4% to -11.6%, P = 0.001) and reduced risk of oestrogen and progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer (OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.82-0.91, P = 6.9 × 10).

Conclusions: The CYP3A7*1C allele is associated with reduced risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer possibly mediated via an effect on the metabolism of endogenous sex hormones in premenopausal women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41416-020-01185-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884683PMC
February 2021

Polymorphisms within the and Loci Influence the Risk of Developing Invasive Aspergillosis: A Two-Stage Case Control Study in the Context of the aspBIOmics Consortium.

J Fungi (Basel) 2020 Dec 23;7(1). Epub 2020 Dec 23.

Hematology Department, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg, Medizinische Klinik II, 97080 Würzburg, Germany.

Here, we assessed whether 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the and loci influence the risk of developing invasive aspergillosis (IA). We conducted a two-stage case control study including 911 high-risk patients diagnosed with hematological malignancies that were ascertained through the aspBIOmics consortium. The meta-analysis of the discovery and replication populations revealed that carriers of the genotype had a significantly increased risk of developing IA ( = 0.00022). We also found that carriers of the allele showed decreased serum levels of TNFSF14 protein ( = 0.0027), and that their macrophages had a decreased fungicidal activity ( = 0.048). In addition, we observed that each copy of the allele increased the risk of IA by 60% ( = 0.0017), whereas each copy of the allele was estimated to decrease the risk of developing the disease ( = 0.0029). Mechanistically, we found that carriers of the risk allele showed increased numbers of CD38+IgM-IgD- plasmablasts in blood ( = 0.00086), whereas those harboring two copies of the allele had decreased serum concentrations of thymic stromal lymphopoietin ( = 0.00097). Finally, we also found that carriers of the protective allele had decreased numbers of CD27-IgM-IgD- B cells ( = 0.00087) and significantly lower numbers of CD14+ and CD14+CD16- cells ( = 0.00018 and 0.00023). Altogether, these results suggest a role of the genes in determining IA risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jof7010004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7823601PMC
December 2020

Factors Associated With the Risk of Progression of Low-Risk Branch-Duct Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms.

JAMA Netw Open 2020 11 2;3(11):e2022933. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Pancreato-biliary Endoscopy and Endoscopic Ultrasound, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute IRCCS, Milan, Italy.

Importance: Branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMNs) are common pancreatic preneoplastic lesions, but their surveillance is not personalized.

Objective: To investigate patient- and cyst-related factors associated with progression into worrisome features (WFs) or high-risk stigmata (HRS) categories of BD-IPMNs.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Cyst- and patient-related factors of consecutive BD-IPMNs without WFs or HRS in 540 patients diagnosed from 2009 to 2018 with at least 12 months' surveillance until February 28, 2020, were registered in a 2-center ambispective cohort study in Italy. In a subgroup, the ABO blood group was studied for the first time in this setting.

Exposure: Cyst-related and patients-related factors and ABO blood group.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The study outcome was the appearance of WFs or HRS according to the 2017 International Association of Pancreatology guidelines. Survival probability was calculated using Kaplan-Meier curve and risk factors identified by Cox proportional hazards regression. ABO blood group was inferred through genotypes with DNA extraction.

Results: Of 540 patients with BD-IPMNs (median age, 66 years [interquartile range, 58.5-72.0 years]; 337 women [62.4%]) undergoing surveillance for a median of 51.5 months (interquartile range, 28-84 months) for 2758 person-years, 130 patients (24.1%) experienced progression. Probability of progression was 3.7% at 1 year, 23.4% at 5 years, and 43.3% at 10 years; 15 patients (2.8%) underwent surgery, 7 patients (1.3%) had malignant histologic findings, and 3 patients (0.56%) died of pancreatic-associated disease. Initial cyst size greater than 15 mm (hazard ratio [HR], 2.05; 95% CI, 1.44-2.91), body mass index greater than 26.4 (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.19-2.50), and heavy smoking (HR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.14-2.86) were significant independent factors associated with progression risk. The AA blood genotype was also associated with progression risk (HR, 3.49; 95% CI, 1.04-11.71) compared with the OO genotype in the investigated subgroup.

Conclusions And Relevance: This analysis of factors associated with progression of BD-IPMNs according to recent guidelines suggests that cyst size alone is not a reliable factor for estimation of progression risk; however, along with other readily available data, size is helpful for planning personalized surveillance of BD-IPMNs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.22933DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7705592PMC
November 2020

Common gene variants within 3'-untranslated regions as modulators of multiple myeloma risk and survival.

Int J Cancer 2021 04 20;148(8):1887-1894. Epub 2020 Nov 20.

Laboratory of Clinical and Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland.

We evaluated the association between germline genetic variants located within the 3'-untranlsated region (polymorphic 3'UTR, ie, p3UTR) of candidate genes involved in multiple myeloma (MM). We performed a case-control study within the International Multiple Myeloma rESEarch (IMMEnSE) consortium, consisting of 3056 MM patients and 1960 controls recruited from eight countries. We selected p3UTR of six genes known to act in different pathways relevant in MM pathogenesis, namely KRAS (rs12587 and rs7973623), VEGFA (rs10434), SPP1 (rs1126772), IRF4 (rs12211228) and IL10 (rs3024496). We found that IL10-rs3024496 was associated with increased risk of developing MM and with a worse overall survival of MM patients. The variant allele was assayed in a vector expressing eGFP chimerized with the IL10 3'-UTR and it was found functionally active following transfection in human myeloma cells. In this experiment, the A-allele caused a lower expression of the reporter gene and this was also in agreement with the in vivo expression of mRNA measured in whole blood as reported in the GTEx portal. Overall, these data are suggestive of an effect of the IL10-rs3024496 SNP on the regulation of IL10 mRNA expression and it could have clinical implications for better characterization of MM patients in terms of prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33377DOI Listing
April 2021

Do myeloproliferative neoplasms and multiple myeloma share the same genetic susceptibility loci?

Int J Cancer 2021 04 27;148(7):1616-1624. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of diseases that cause myeloid hematopoietic cells to overproliferate. Epidemiological and familial studies suggest that genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing MPN, but the genetic susceptibility of MPN is still not well known. Indeed, only few loci are known to have a clear role in the predisposition to this disease. Some studies reported a diagnosis of MPNs and multiple myeloma (MM) in the same patients, but the biological causes are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the two diseases share at least partly the same genetic risk loci. In the context of a European multicenter study with 460 cases and 880 controls, we analyzed the effect of the known MM risk loci, individually and in a polygenic risk score (PRS). The most significant result was obtained among patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) for PS0RS1C1-rs2285803, which showed to be associated with an increased risk (OR = 3.28, 95% CI 1.79-6.02, P = .00012, P = .00276 when taking into account multiple testing). Additionally, the PRS showed an association with MPN risk when comparing the last with the first quartile of the PRS (OR = 2.39, 95% CI 1.64-3.48, P = 5.98 × 10 ). In conclusion, our results suggest a potential common genetic background between MPN and MM, which needs to be further investigated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33337DOI Listing
April 2021

Genetic polymorphisms associated with telomere length and risk of developing myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Blood Cancer J 2020 09 1;10(8):89. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

Telomere length measured in leukocyte (LTL) has been found to be associated with the risk of developing several cancer types, including myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). LTL is genetically determined by, at least, 11 SNPs previously shown to influence LTL. Their combination in a score has been used as a genetic instrument to measure LTL and evaluate the causative association between LTL and the risk of several cancer types. We tested, for the first time, the "teloscore" in 480 MPN patients and 909 healthy controls in a European multi-center case-control study. We found an increased risk to develop MPNs with longer genetically determined telomeres (OR = 1.82, 95% CI 1.24-2.68, P = 2.21 × 10, comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of the teloscore distribution). Analyzing the SNPs individually we confirm the association between TERT-rs2736100-C allele and increased risk of developing MPNs and we report a novel association of the OBFC1-rs9420907-C variant with higher MPN risk (OR= 1.43; 95% CI 1.15-1.77; P = 1.35 × 10). Consistently with the results obtained with the teloscore, both risk alleles are also associated with longer LTL. In conclusion, our results suggest that genetically determined longer telomeres could be a risk marker for MPN development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41408-020-00356-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7463014PMC
September 2020

Germline genetic variability in pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis.

Semin Cancer Biol 2020 Aug 18. Epub 2020 Aug 18.

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

Pancreatic cancer (PC), particularly its most common form, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), is relatively rare but highly lethal. Knowledge about PC risk factors could in the long term contribute to early diagnosis and mortality reduction. We review the current status of research on germline genetic factors for PC risk. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) successfully identified common loci convincingly associated with PC risk, an endeavor that is still ongoing. The function of only a handful of risk loci has being thoroughly characterized so far. Secondary analyses of existing GWAS data are being used to discover novel loci. GWAS data have also been used to study additional risk factors with a Mendelian randomization approach. Polygenic/multifactorial risk scores show much larger risks than individual variants, but their use for risk stratification in the population is not warranted yet. At the other end of the spectrum of inherited PC risk factors, rare high-penetrance variants co-segregating with the disease have been observed in familial cancer syndromes that include PC, or in families with multiple recurrence of PC alone. Rare variants predicted to have a deleterious effect on function are studied also with a case-control approach, by resequencing candidate genes or whole-exomes/whole-genomes. Telomere length and mitochondrial DNA copy number are useful additional DNA-based markers of PC susceptibility. The role of common variants in prognosis of PC patients has also been explored, albeit with more limited success than risk. Finally, genetics of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET), a rarer and heterogeneous form of PC, is still understudied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2020.08.003DOI Listing
August 2020

Polygenic and multifactorial scores for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma risk prediction.

J Med Genet 2021 Jun 26;58(6):369-377. Epub 2020 Jun 26.

Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Most cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are asymptomatic in early stages, and the disease is typically diagnosed in advanced phases, resulting in very high mortality. Tools to identify individuals at high risk of developing PDAC would be useful to improve chances of early detection.

Objective: We generated a polygenic risk score (PRS) for PDAC risk prediction, combining the effect of known risk SNPs, and carried out an exploratory analysis of a multifactorial score.

Methods: We tested the associations of the individual known risk SNPs on up to 2851 PDAC cases and 4810 controls of European origin from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. Thirty risk SNPs were included in a PRS, which was computed on the subset of subjects that had 100% call rate, consisting of 839 cases and 2040 controls in PANDoRA and 6420 cases and 4889 controls from the previously published Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium I-III and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium genome-wide association studies. Additional exploratory multifactorial scores were constructed by complementing the genetic score with smoking and diabetes.

Results: The scores were associated with increased PDAC risk and reached high statistical significance (OR=2.70, 95% CI 1.99 to 3.68, p=2.54×10 highest vs lowest quintile of the weighted PRS, and OR=14.37, 95% CI 5.57 to 37.09, p=3.64×10, highest vs lowest quintile of the weighted multifactorial score).

Conclusion: We found a highly significant association between a PRS and PDAC risk, which explains more than individual SNPs and is a step forward in the direction of the construction of a tool for risk stratification in the population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-106961DOI Listing
June 2021

Germline HOXB13 mutations p.G84E and p.R217C do not confer an increased breast cancer risk.

Sci Rep 2020 06 16;10(1):9688. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

In breast cancer, high levels of homeobox protein Hox-B13 (HOXB13) have been associated with disease progression of ER-positive breast cancer patients and resistance to tamoxifen treatment. Since HOXB13 p.G84E is a prostate cancer risk allele, we evaluated the association between HOXB13 germline mutations and breast cancer risk in a previous study consisting of 3,270 familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases and 2,327 controls from the Netherlands. Although both recurrent HOXB13 mutations p.G84E and p.R217C were not associated with breast cancer risk, the risk estimation for p.R217C was not very precise. To provide more conclusive evidence regarding the role of HOXB13 in breast cancer susceptibility, we here evaluated the association between HOXB13 mutations and increased breast cancer risk within 81 studies of the international Breast Cancer Association Consortium containing 68,521 invasive breast cancer patients and 54,865 controls. Both HOXB13 p.G84E and p.R217C did not associate with the development of breast cancer in European women, neither in the overall analysis (OR = 1.035, 95% CI = 0.859-1.246, P = 0.718 and OR = 0.798, 95% CI = 0.482-1.322, P = 0.381 respectively), nor in specific high-risk subgroups or breast cancer subtypes. Thus, although involved in breast cancer progression, HOXB13 is not a material breast cancer susceptibility gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-65665-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7297796PMC
June 2020

Genome-Wide Gene-Diabetes and Gene-Obesity Interaction Scan in 8,255 Cases and 11,900 Controls from PanScan and PanC4 Consortia.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2020 09 16;29(9):1784-1791. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Background: Obesity and diabetes are major modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Interactions between genetic variants and diabetes/obesity have not previously been comprehensively investigated in pancreatic cancer at the genome-wide level.

Methods: We conducted a gene-environment interaction (GxE) analysis including 8,255 cases and 11,900 controls from four pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets (Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium I-III and Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium). Obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m) and diabetes (duration ≥3 years) were the environmental variables of interest. Approximately 870,000 SNPs (minor allele frequency ≥0.005, genotyped in at least one dataset) were analyzed. Case-control (CC), case-only (CO), and joint-effect test methods were used for SNP-level GxE analysis. As a complementary approach, gene-based GxE analysis was also performed. Age, sex, study site, and principal components accounting for population substructure were included as covariates. Meta-analysis was applied to combine individual GWAS summary statistics.

Results: No genome-wide significant interactions (departures from a log-additive odds model) with diabetes or obesity were detected at the SNP level by the CC or CO approaches. The joint-effect test detected numerous genome-wide significant GxE signals in the GWAS main effects top hit regions, but the significance diminished after adjusting for the GWAS top hits. In the gene-based analysis, a significant interaction of diabetes with variants in the (family with sequence similarity 63 member A) gene (significance threshold < 1.25 × 10) was observed in the meta-analysis ( = 1.2 ×10, = 4.2 ×10).

Conclusions: This analysis did not find significant GxE interactions at the SNP level but found one significant interaction with diabetes at the gene level. A larger sample size might unveil additional genetic factors via GxE scans.

Impact: This study may contribute to discovering the mechanism of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-0275DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7483330PMC
September 2020

Genome-wide association study identifies 32 novel breast cancer susceptibility loci from overall and subtype-specific analyses.

Nat Genet 2020 06 18;52(6):572-581. Epub 2020 May 18.

Molecular Medicine Unit, Fundación Pública Galega de Medicina Xenómica, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Breast cancer susceptibility variants frequently show heterogeneity in associations by tumor subtype. To identify novel loci, we performed a genome-wide association study including 133,384 breast cancer cases and 113,789 controls, plus 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,414 with breast cancer) of European ancestry, using both standard and novel methodologies that account for underlying tumor heterogeneity by estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status and tumor grade. We identified 32 novel susceptibility loci (P < 5.0 × 10), 15 of which showed evidence for associations with at least one tumor feature (false discovery rate < 0.05). Five loci showed associations (P < 0.05) in opposite directions between luminal and non-luminal subtypes. In silico analyses showed that these five loci contained cell-specific enhancers that differed between normal luminal and basal mammary cells. The genetic correlations between five intrinsic-like subtypes ranged from 0.35 to 0.80. The proportion of genome-wide chip heritability explained by all known susceptibility loci was 54.2% for luminal A-like disease and 37.6% for triple-negative disease. The odds ratios of polygenic risk scores, which included 330 variants, for the highest 1% of quantiles compared with middle quantiles were 5.63 and 3.02 for luminal A-like and triple-negative disease, respectively. These findings provide an improved understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer subtypes and will inform the development of subtype-specific polygenic risk scores.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-020-0609-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7808397PMC
June 2020

Combined Associations of a Polygenic Risk Score and Classical Risk Factors With Breast Cancer Risk.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2021 03;113(3):329-337

Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

We evaluated the joint associations between a new 313-variant PRS (PRS313) and questionnaire-based breast cancer risk factors for women of European ancestry, using 72 284 cases and 80 354 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Interactions were evaluated using standard logistic regression and a newly developed case-only method for breast cancer risk overall and by estrogen receptor status. After accounting for multiple testing, we did not find evidence that per-standard deviation PRS313 odds ratio differed across strata defined by individual risk factors. Goodness-of-fit tests did not reject the assumption of a multiplicative model between PRS313 and each risk factor. Variation in projected absolute lifetime risk of breast cancer associated with classical risk factors was greater for women with higher genetic risk (PRS313 and family history) and, on average, 17.5% higher in the highest vs lowest deciles of genetic risk. These findings have implications for risk prevention for women at increased risk of breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djaa056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7936056PMC
March 2021

Role of OPRM1, clinical and anthropometric variants in neonatal pain reduction.

Sci Rep 2020 04 27;10(1):7091. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

An increased awareness on neonatal pain-associated complications has led to the development of pain scales adequate to assess the level of pain experienced by newborns such as the ABC score. A commonly used analgesic procedure is to administer a 33% oral dextrose solution to newborns prior to the painful intervention. Although this procedure is very successful, not in all subjects it reaches complete efficacy. A possible explanation for the different response to the treatment could be genetic variability. We have investigated the genetic variability of the OPRM1 gene in 1077 newborns in relation to non-pharmacologic pain relief treatment. We observed that the procedure was successful in 966 individuals and there was no association between the genotypes and the analgesic efficacy when comparing individuals that had an ABC score = 0 and ABC score >0. However, considering only the individuals with ABC score>0, we found that the homozygous carriers of the G allele of the missense variant SNP rs1799971 (A118G) showed an interesting association with higher ABC score. We also observed that individuals fed with formula milk were more likely to not respond to the analgesic treatment compared to those that had been breastfed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-63790-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7184594PMC
April 2020

Genome-wide association study identifies an early onset pancreatic cancer risk locus.

Int J Cancer 2020 10 1;147(8):2065-2074. Epub 2020 May 1.

Institute for Translational Medicine, Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.

Early onset pancreatic cancer (EOPC) is a rare disease with a very high mortality rate. Almost nothing is known on the genetic susceptibility of EOPC, therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants specific for patients diagnosed with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) at younger ages. In the first phase, conducted on 821 cases with age of onset ≤60 years, of whom 198 with age of onset ≤50, and 3227 controls from PanScan I-II, we observed four SNPs (rs7155613, rs2328991, rs4891017 and rs12610094) showing an association with EOPC risk (P < 1 × 10 ). We replicated these SNPs in the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium and used additional in silico data from PanScan III and PanC4. Among these four variants rs2328991 was significant in an independent set of 855 cases with age of onset ≤60 years, of whom 265 with age of onset ≤50, and 4142 controls from the PANDoRA consortium while in the in silico data, we observed no statistically significant association. However, the resulting meta-analysis supported the association (P = 1.15 × 10 ). In conclusion, we propose a novel variant rs2328991 to be involved in EOPC risk. Even though it was not possible to find a mechanistic link between the variant and the function, the association is supported by a solid statistical significance obtained in the largest study on EOPC genetics present so far in the literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33004DOI Listing
October 2020
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