Publications by authors named "Daniela Valpiani"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Early Resolution of Heyde's Syndrome following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Semin Thromb Hemost 2021 Feb 23;47(1):102-104. Epub 2020 Dec 23.

Cardiology Unit, Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1718871DOI Listing
February 2021

The use of 5-aminosalicylate for patients with Crohn's disease in a prospective European inception cohort with 5 years follow-up - an Epi-IBD study.

United European Gastroenterol J 2020 10 26;8(8):949-960. Epub 2020 Jul 26.

Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK.

Background: The lack of scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of 5-aminosalicylate in patients with Crohn's disease is in sharp contrast to its widespread use in clinical practice.

Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the use of 5-aminosalicylate in patients with Crohn's disease as well as the disease course of a subgroup of patients who were treated with 5-aminosalicylate as maintenance monotherapy during the first year of disease.

Methods: In a European community-based inception cohort, 488 patients with Crohn's disease were followed from the time of their diagnosis. Information on clinical data, demographics, disease activity, medical therapy and rates of surgery, cancers and deaths was collected prospectively. Patient management was left to the discretion of the treating gastroenterologists.

Results: Overall, 292 (60%) patients with Crohn's disease received 5-aminosalicylate period during follow-up for a median duration of 28 months (interquartile range 6-60). Of these, 78 (16%) patients received 5-aminosalicylate monotherapy during the first year following diagnosis. Patients who received monotherapy with 5-aminosalicylate experienced a mild disease course with only nine (12%) who required hospitalization, surgery, or developed stricturing or penetrating disease, and most never needed more intensive therapy. The remaining 214 patients were treated with 5-aminosalicylate as the first maintenance drug although most eventually needed to step up to other treatments including immunomodulators (75 (35%)), biological therapy (49 (23%)) or surgery (38 (18%)).

Conclusion: In this European community-based inception cohort of unselected Crohn's disease patients, 5-aminosalicylate was commonly used. A substantial group of these patients experienced a quiescent disease course without need of additional treatment during follow-up. Therefore, despite the controversy regarding the efficacy of 5-aminosalicylate in Crohn's disease, its use seems to result in a satisfying disease course for both patients and physicians.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050640620945949DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7707880PMC
October 2020

Health-care costs of inflammatory bowel disease in a pan-European, community-based, inception cohort during 5 years of follow-up: a population-based study.

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol 2020 05 13;5(5):454-464. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, UK; Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK.

Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) places a significant burden on health-care systems because of its chronicity and need for expensive therapies and surgery. With increasing use of biological therapies, contemporary data on IBD health-care costs are important for those responsible for allocating resources in Europe. To our knowledge, no prospective long-term analysis of the health-care costs of patients with IBD in the era of biologicals has been done in Europe. We aimed to investigate cost profiles of a pan-European, community-based inception cohort during 5 years of follow-up.

Methods: The Epi-IBD cohort is a community-based, prospective inception cohort of unselected patients with IBD diagnosed in 2010 at centres in 20 European countries plus Israel. Incident patients who were diagnosed with IBD according to the Copenhagen Diagnostic Criteria between Jan 1, and Dec 31, 2010, and were aged 15 years or older the time of diagnosis were prospectively included. Data on clinical characteristics and direct costs (investigations and outpatient visits, blood tests, treatments, hospitalisations, and surgeries) were collected prospectively using electronic case-report forms. Patient-level costs incorporated procedures leading to the initial diagnosis of IBD and costs of IBD management during the 5-year follow-up period. Costs incurred by comorbidities and unrelated to IBD were excluded. We grouped direct costs into the following five categories: investigations (including outpatient visits and blood tests), conventional medical treatment, biological therapy, hospitalisation, and surgery.

Findings: The study population consisted of 1289 patients with IBD, with 1073 (83%) patients from western Europe and 216 (17%) from eastern Europe. 488 (38%) patients had Crohn's disease, 717 (56%) had ulcerative colitis, and 84 (6%) had IBD unclassified. The mean cost per patient-year during follow-up for patients with IBD was €2609 (SD 7389; median €446 [IQR 164-1849]). The mean cost per patient-year during follow-up was €3542 (8058; median €717 [214-3512]) for patients with Crohn's disease, €2088 (7058; median €408 [133-1161]) for patients with ulcerative colitis, and €1609 (5010; median €415 [92-1228]) for patients with IBD unclassified (p<0·0001). Costs were highest in the first year and then decreased significantly during follow-up. Hospitalisations and diagnostic procedures accounted for more than 50% of costs during the first year. However, in subsequent years there was a steady increase in expenditure on biologicals, which accounted for 73% of costs in Crohn's disease and 48% in ulcerative colitis, in year 5. The mean annual cost per patient-year for biologicals was €866 (SD 3056). The mean yearly costs of biological therapy were higher in patients with Crohn's disease (€1782 [SD 4370]) than in patients with ulcerative colitis (€286 [1427]) or IBD unclassified (€521 [2807]; p<0·0001).

Interpretation: Overall direct expenditure on health care decreased over a 5-year follow-up period. This period was characterised by increasing expenditure on biologicals and decreasing expenditure on conventional medical treatments, hospitalisations, and surgeries. In light of the expenditures associated with biological therapy, cost-effective treatment strategies are needed to reduce the economic burden of inflammatory bowel disease.

Funding: Kirsten og Freddy Johansens Fond and Nordsjællands Hospital Forskningsråd.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-1253(20)30012-1DOI Listing
May 2020

Disease course of inflammatory bowel disease unclassified in a European population-based inception cohort: An Epi-IBD study.

J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2019 Jun 21;34(6):996-1003. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.

Background And Aim: A definitive diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) is not always possible, and a proportion of patients will be diagnosed as inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU). The aim of the study was to investigate the prognosis of patients initially diagnosed with IBDU and the disease course during the following 5 years.

Methods: The Epi-IBD study is a prospective population-based cohort of 1289 IBD patients diagnosed in centers across Europe. Clinical data were captured prospectively throughout the follow-up period.

Results: Overall, 476 (37%) patients were initially diagnosed with CD, 701 (54%) with UC, and 112 (9%) with IBDU. During follow-up, 28 (25%) IBDU patients were changed diagnoses to either UC (n = 20, 71%) or CD (n = 8, 29%) after a median of 6 months (interquartile range: 4-12), while 84 (7% of the total cohort) remained IBDU. A total of 17 (15%) IBDU patients were hospitalized for their IBD during follow-up, while 8 (7%) patients underwent surgery. Most surgeries (n = 6, 75%) were performed on patients whose diagnosis was later changed to UC; three of these colectomies led to a definitive diagnosis of UC. Most patients (n = 107, 96%) received 5-aminosalicylic acid, while 11 (10%) patients received biologicals, of whom five remained classified as IBDU.

Conclusions: In a population-based inception cohort, 7% of IBD patients were not given a definitive diagnosis of IBD after 5 years of follow-up. One in four patients with IBDU eventually was classified as CD or UC. Overall, the disease course and medication burden in IBDU patients were mild.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgh.14563DOI Listing
June 2019

Natural Disease Course of Ulcerative Colitis During the First Five Years of Follow-up in a European Population-based Inception Cohort-An Epi-IBD Study.

J Crohns Colitis 2019 Feb;13(2):198-208

IBD Clinical and Research Centre, ISCARE, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background And Aims: Few population-based cohort studies have assessed the disease course of ulcerative colitis [UC] in the era of biological therapy and widespread use of immunomodulators. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year outcome and disease course of patients with UC in the Epi-IBD cohort.

Methods: In a prospective, population-based inception cohort of unselected patients with UC, patients were followed up from the time of their diagnosis, which included the collection of their clinical data, demographics, disease activity, medical therapy, and rates of surgery, cancers, and deaths. Associations between outcomes and multiple covariates were analysed by Cox regression analysis.

Results: A total of 717 patients were included in the study. During follow-up, 43 [6%] patients underwent a colectomy and 163 [23%] patients were hospitalised. Of patients with limited colitis [distal to the left flexure], 90 [21%] progressed to extensive colitis. In addition, 92 [27%] patients with extensive colitis experienced a regression in disease extent, which was associated with a reduced risk of hospitalisation (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.5 95% CI: 0.3-0.8]. Overall, patients were treated similarly in both geographical regions; 80 [11%] patients needed biological therapy and 210 [29%] patients received immunomodulators. Treatment with immunomodulators was found to reduce the risk of hospitalisation [HR: 0.5 95% CI: 0.3-0.8].

Conclusions: Although patients in this population-based cohort were treated more aggressively with immunomodulators and biological therapy than in cohorts from the previous two decades, their disease outcomes, including colectomy rates, were no different. However, treatment with immunomodulators was found to reduce the risk of hospitalisation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy154DOI Listing
February 2019

Vitamin D deficiency in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort: an Epi-IBD study.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2018 11;30(11):1297-1303

Pekka Collin Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.

Background: Serum vitamin D level is commonly low in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although there is a growing body of evidence that links low vitamin D level to certain aspects of IBD such as disease activity and quality of life, data on its prevalence and how it varies across disease phenotype, smoking status and treatment groups are still missing.

Materials And Methods: Patients diagnosed with IBD between 2010 and 2011 were recruited. Demographic data and serum vitamin D levels were collected. Variance of vitamin D level was then assessed across different treatment groups, disease phenotype, disease activity and quality of life scores.

Results: A total of 238 (55.9% male) patients were included. Overall, 79% of the patients had either insufficient or deficient levels of vitamin D at diagnosis. Patients needing corticosteroid treatment at 1 year had significantly lower vitamin D levels at diagnosis (median 36.0 nmol/l) (P=0.035). Harvey-Bradshaw Index (P=0.0001) and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index scores (P=0.0001) were significantly lower in patients with higher vitamin D level. Serum vitamin D level correlated significantly with SIBQ score (P=0.0001) and with multiple components of SF12. Smokers at diagnosis had the lowest vitamin D levels (vitamin D: 34 nmol/l; P=0.053).

Conclusion: This study demonstrates the high prevalence of low vitamin D levels in treatment-naive European IBD populations. Furthermore, it demonstrates the presence of low vitamin D levels in patients with IBD who smoke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MEG.0000000000001238DOI Listing
November 2018

Natural disease course of Crohn's disease during the first 5 years after diagnosis in a European population-based inception cohort: an Epi-IBD study.

Gut 2019 03 23;68(3):423-433. Epub 2018 Jan 23.

IBD Clinical and Research Centre, ISCARE, Prague, Czech Republic.

Objective: The Epi-IBD cohort is a prospective population-based inception cohort of unselected patients with inflammatory bowel disease from 29 European centres covering a background population of almost 10 million people. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year outcome and disease course of patients with Crohn's disease (CD).

Design: Patients were followed up prospectively from the time of diagnosis, including collection of their clinical data, demographics, disease activity, medical therapy, surgery, cancers and deaths. Associations between outcomes and multiple covariates were analysed by Cox regression analysis.

Results: In total, 488 patients were included in the study. During follow-up, 107 (22%) patients received surgery, while 176 (36%) patients were hospitalised because of CD. A total of 49 (14%) patients diagnosed with non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease progressed to either stricturing and/or penetrating disease. These rates did not differ between patients from Western and Eastern Europe. However, significant geographic differences were noted regarding treatment: more patients in Western Europe received biological therapy (33%) and immunomodulators (66%) than did those in Eastern Europe (14% and 54%, respectively, P<0.01), while more Eastern European patients received 5-aminosalicylates (90% vs 56%, P<0.05). Treatment with immunomodulators reduced the risk of surgery (HR: 0.4, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.6) and hospitalisation (HR: 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.5).

Conclusion: Despite patients being treated early and frequently with immunomodulators and biological therapy in Western Europe, 5-year outcomes including surgery and phenotype progression in this cohort were comparable across Western and Eastern Europe. Differences in treatment strategies between Western and Eastern European centres did not affect the disease course. Treatment with immunomodulators reduced the risk of surgery and hospitalisation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2017-315568DOI Listing
March 2019

A model of an inflammatory bowel disease population-based registry: The Forlì experience (1993-2013).

Dig Liver Dis 2018 Jan 21;50(1):32-36. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Romagna Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy.

Background And Aims: The article presents a population-based registry designed to estimate incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the area of Forlì (north-eastern Italy).

Methods: The registry included all patients with IBD ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in the Forlì area from 1993 to 2013. A data manager matched records from various sources.

Results: Seven hundred ninety-one patients were registered during the study period, 564 (71.3%) with UC and 227 (28.7%) with CD. The standardized annual incidence rate for UC was 12.8 per 100,000 females (95% CI 11.1-14.4) and 15.7 per 100,000 males (95% CI 13.9-17.5). That of CD was 7.0 per 100,000 for females (95% CI 5.7-8.3) and 5.4 per 100,000 males (95% CI 4.3-6.4). The prevalence of CD and UC on 1 January 2014 was 109.2 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI 94.3-124.2) and 266.4 per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI 243.4-289.7), respectively.

Conclusions: Although further studies are needed, the data suggest that incidence and prevalence of IBD in Italy are underestimated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2017.09.120DOI Listing
January 2018

Patient and physician views on the quality of care in inflammatory bowel disease: results from SOLUTION-1, a prospective IG-IBD study.

J Crohns Colitis 2014 Dec 10;8(12):1642-52. Epub 2014 Aug 10.

Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Departement, Bolzano Central Hospital, Italy.

Introduction: Remarkable differences in quality of care (QoC) might be observed in different countries, affecting quality of life of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The aim of this study was to assess patient and physician perceptions of the QoC in Italy.

Methods: A multicentre observational study on the quality of care in IBD (SOLUTION-1) was conducted in 36 IG-IBD (Italian Group for Inflammatory Bowel Disease) centres in Italy. The QUOTE-IBD (Quality of Care Through the Patient's Eyes) questionnaire was administered to IBD patients and to the attending physicians. The Quality Impact (QI) score summarises the QUOTE-IBD questionnaire, and a QI >9 is considered satisfactory.

Results: Nine-hundred-ninety-two patients and 75 physicians completed the QUOTE-IBD questionnaire. The patients scored the domains of competence (9.47 vs. 8.55) and costs (9.54 vs. 8.26) higher that the physicians, while information (9.31 vs. 9.43) and continuity of care (8.40 vs. 9.01) were scored lower. The QI score was rated worse by physicians with less experience (<12 years) with regard to competence (8.0 vs. 9.01), courtesy (8.12 vs. 10.0) and autonomy (8.97 vs. 10.0). Physicians considered the cost domain unsatisfactory.

Conclusions: Healthcare was rated as satisfactory overall for Italian patients and physicians. The physicians underestimate their competence and consider the cost of medical management unsatisfactory. The patients are more critical regarding the continuity of care and information. Country-specific data on QoC allow local governments to allocate resources more effectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crohns.2014.07.004DOI Listing
December 2014

[Predictors of clinical response in patients with ulcerative colitis treated with granulocyte-monocyte apheresis: analysis of the apheresis registry data].

G Ital Nefrol 2012 Jan-Feb;29 Suppl 54:S144-6

U.O. Nefrologia e Dialisi, Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy.

We analyzed predictors of clinical response after a cycle of granulocytemonocyte apheresis in 173 patients with ulcerative colitis. Hemoglobin levels independently predicted good clinical outcome.
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June 2012

The Italian Registry of Therapeutic Apheresis: granulocyte-monocyte apheresis in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. A multicentric study.

J Clin Apher 2011 Dec 9;26(6):332-7. Epub 2011 Nov 9.

Nephrology Division, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy.

Leukocytes are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases; granulocyte-monocyte adsorptive (GMA) apheresis, an extracorporeal technique aimed at removing activated circulating leukocytes from the blood, may represent a safe and effective therapeutic tool in these patients. The Italian Registry of Therapeutic Apheresis performed an observational, multicentric study involving 24 Gastroenterology Units. In this study, laboratory data and clinical outcomes of 230 patients (148 males, mean age 43.5 years) affected with ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 194) or Crohn's disease (CD, n = 36) who underwent one or more cycles of GMA were analyzed. Each cycle consisted of five GMA treatments. The patients were followed up for a mean of 8.7 (min. 3 to max. 12) months. At 3 months, positive outcome was achieved in 77.7% of UC patients (72.0% remission, 5.7% clinical response) and 61.3% of CD patients (54.8% remission, 6.5% clinical response). The cumulative proportion of positive outcome at 12 months was 87.1% for UC patients (83.7% remission, 3.4% clinical response) and 77.4% for CD patients (74.2% remission, 3.2% clinical response). No single clinical or laboratory parameter among those analyzed (age, sex, disease characteristics, history of smoking, medication history, baseline values of clinical activity index (CAI)/Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI), hemoglobin, white blood cells count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) was independently associated with clinical outcome. The procedure was well tolerated with no significant adverse effects registered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jca.20315DOI Listing
December 2011

Prognostic significance of endoscopic remission in patients with active ulcerative colitis treated with oral and topical mesalazine: a prospective, multicenter study.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2012 Jun 9;18(6):1006-10. Epub 2011 Aug 9.

Divisione di Gastroenterologia, Ospedale Valduce, Como, Italy.

Background: It has been recommended that the treatment of active ulcerative colitis (UC) should be continued until complete healing of endoscopic lesions. However, the evidence supporting this recommendation is scanty. Aims of the present study were to assess the rate of patients with active UC who achieve clinical but not endoscopic remission after treatment with oral plus topical mesalazine and to compare the rate of relapse in patients with clinical/endoscopic remission and those with only clinical remission.

Methods: Patients with active mild or moderate UC were eligible. All patients received mesalazine, 4 g/day orally and 2 g/day per rectum for 6 weeks. Those achieving clinical remission underwent colonoscopy: afterwards, all received maintenance treatment with oral mesalazine, 2 g/day orally for 1 year. Clinical remission was defined as normal frequency of bowel movements with formed stools, no abdominal pain, and no blood in the stools. Endoscopic remission was defined as normal-appearing mucosa or only mild redness and/or friability, without either ulcers or erosions.

Results: In all, 81 patients were enrolled. Sixty-one (75%) achieved clinical remission. Endoscopic activity was still present in five (8%). The cumulative rate of relapse at 1 year was 23% in patients with clinical and endoscopic remission and 80% in patients with only clinical remission (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Persistence of endoscopic activity is quite infrequent in patients with active UC achieving clinical remission after a 6-week treatment with oral plus topical mesalazine, but is a very strong predictor of early relapse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ibd.21838DOI Listing
June 2012

Topical treatment of distal active ulcerative colitis with beclomethasone dipropionate or mesalamine: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

J Clin Gastroenterol 2005 Apr;39(4):291-7

Institute of Clinical Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Italy.

Goals: Therapy for active ulcerative colitis (UC) usually involves rectal formulations of corticosteroids (CS), which are characterized by the risk of systemic steroid-related adverse effects.

Background: To compare the efficacy and safety of the topically acting CS beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) versus mesalamine (5-ASA) in the treatment of active UC.

Study: Patients with mild to moderate distal active UC were randomized to a 6-week treatment with BDP 3 mg enema o.d. or 5-ASA 1 g enema daily in a single-blind, multicenter, parallel-group, controlled study. The primary efficacy variable was the decrease in Disease Activity Index (DAI) score. Safety variables were adrenal function, monitoring of adverse events, vital signs, and laboratory parameters.

Results: A total of 217 patients were enrolled and treated with BDP (n = 111) or 5-ASA (n = 106). A significant decrease in the DAI score (P < 0.05) was observed in both treatment groups, with a clinical remission rate of 36.7% in the BDP group and of 29.2% in the 5-ASA group. Both treatments were well tolerated. No changes from baseline in morning cortisol levels were observed in the BDP group.

Conclusions: BDP administered as a rectal enema over a 6-week treatment period was efficacious and safe in patients with active UC, without interference with pituitary adrenal axis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.mcg.0000155124.74548.61DOI Listing
April 2005