Publications by authors named "Daniel R Gentile"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Novel K-Ras G12C Switch-II Covalent Binders Destabilize Ras and Accelerate Nucleotide Exchange.

J Chem Inf Model 2018 02 31;58(2):464-471. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Department of Organic Chemistry, The Weizmann Institute of Science , Rehovot, 7610001, Israel.

The success of targeted covalent inhibitors in the global pharmaceutical industry has led to a resurgence of covalent drug discovery. However, covalent inhibitor design for flexible binding sites remains a difficult task due to a lack of methodological development. Here, we compared covalent docking to empirical electrophile screening against the highly dynamic target K-Ras. While the overall hit rate of both methods was comparable, we were able to rapidly progress a docking hit to a potent irreversible covalent binder that modifies the inactive, GDP-bound state of K-Ras. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to probe the protein dynamics of compound binding to the switch-II pocket and subsequent destabilization of the nucleotide-binding region. SOS-mediated nucleotide exchange assays showed that, contrary to prior switch-II pocket inhibitors, these new compounds appear to accelerate nucleotide exchange. This study highlights the efficiency of covalent docking as a tool for the discovery of chemically novel hits against challenging targets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jcim.7b00399DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6179444PMC
February 2018

Ras Binder Induces a Modified Switch-II Pocket in GTP and GDP States.

Cell Chem Biol 2017 12 12;24(12):1455-1466.e14. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Electronic address:

Covalent inhibitors of K-Ras(G12C) have been reported that exclusively recognize the GDP state. Here, we utilize disulfide tethering of a non-natural cysteine (K-Ras(M72C)) to identify a new switch-II pocket (S-IIP) binding ligand (2C07) that engages the active GTP state. Co-crystal structures of 2C07 bound to H-Ras(M72C) reveal binding in a cryptic groove we term S-IIG. In the GppNHp state, 2C07 binding to a modified S-IIP pushes switch I away from the nucleotide, breaking the network of polar contacts essential for adopting the canonical GTP state. Biochemical studies show that 2C07 alters nucleotide preference and inhibits SOS binding and catalyzed nucleotide exchange. 2C07 was converted to irreversible covalent analogs, which target both nucleotide states, inhibit PI3K activation in vitro, and function as occupancy probes to detect reversible engagement in competition assays. Targeting both nucleotide states opens the possibility of inhibiting oncogenic mutants of Ras, which exist predominantly in the GTP state in cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol.2017.08.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5915340PMC
December 2017

Aspirin's Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses.

Mol Med 2015 Jun 18;21:526-35. Epub 2015 Jun 18.

Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, New York, United States of America.

Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin's bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world's longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2119/molmed.2015.00148DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4607614PMC
June 2015