Publications by authors named "Daniel L Jacobs"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Meso-scale topological cues influence extracellular matrix production in a large deformation, elastomeric scaffold model.

Soft Matter 2018 Oct;14(42):8483-8495

Departments of Bioengineering and Surgery, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 450 Technology Drive, Pittsburgh, 15216, USA.

Physical cues are decisive factors in extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and elaboration. Their transduction across scale lengths is an inherently symbiotic phenomenon that while influencing ECM fate is also mediated by the ECM structure itself. This study investigates the possibility of enhancing ECM elaboration by topological cues that, while not modifying the substrate macro scale mechanics, can affect the meso-scale strain range acting on cells incorporated within the scaffold. Vascular smooth muscle cell micro-integrated, electrospun scaffolds were fabricated with comparable macroscopic biaxial mechanical response, but different meso-scale topology. Seeded scaffolds were conditioned on a stretch bioreactor and exposed to large strain deformations. Samples were processed to evaluate ECM quantity and quality via: biochemical assay, qualitative and quantitative histological assessment and multi-photon analysis. Experimental evaluation was coupled to a numerical model that elucidated the relationship between the scaffold micro-architecture and the strain acting on the cells. Results showed an higher amount of ECM formation for the scaffold type characterized by lowest fiber intersection density. The numerical model simulations associated this result with the differences found for the change in cell nuclear aspect ratio and showed that given comparable macro scale mechanics, a difference in material topology created significant differences in cell-scaffold meso-scale deformations. These findings reaffirmed the role of cell shape in ECM formation and introduced a novel notion for the engineering of cardiac tissue where biomaterial structure can be designed to both mimick the organ level mechanics of a specific tissue of interest and elicit a desirable cellular response.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8sm01352gDOI Listing
October 2018

Nitro-Oleic Acid (NO-OA) Release Enhances Regional Angiogenesis in a Rat Abdominal Wall Defect Model.

Tissue Eng Part A 2018 06 27;24(11-12):889-904. Epub 2018 Feb 27.

1 Departments of Bioengineering and Surgery, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh , Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Ventral hernia is often addressed surgically by the placement of prosthetic materials, either synthetic or from allogeneic and xenogeneic biologic sources. Despite advances in surgical approaches and device design, a number of postsurgical limitations remain, including hernia recurrence, mesh encapsulation, and reduced vascularity of the implanted volume. The in situ controlled release of angiogenic factors from a scaffold facilitating abdominal wall repair might address some of these issues associated with suboptimal tissue reconstruction. Furthermore, a biocomposite material that combines the favorable mechanical properties achievable with synthetic materials and the bioactivity associated with xenogeneic tissue sources would be desirable. In this report, an abdominal wall repair scaffold has been designed based on a microfibrous, elastomeric poly(ester carbonate)urethane urea matrix integrated with a hydrogel derived from decellularized porcine dermis (extracellular matrix [ECM] gel) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with nitro-oleic acid (NO-OA). NO-OA is an electrophilic fatty acid nitro-alkene derivative that, under hypoxic conditions, induces angiogenesis. This scaffold was utilized to repair a rat abdominal wall partial thickness defect, hypothesizing that the nitro-fatty acid release would facilitate increased angiogenesis at the 8-week endpoint. The quantification of neovascularization was conducted by novel methodologies to assess vessel morphology and spatial distribution. The repaired abdominal wall defects were evaluated by histopathologic methods, including quantification of the foreign body response and cellular ingrowth. The results showed that NO-OA release was associated with significantly improved regional angiogenesis. The combined biohybrid scaffold and NO-OA-controlled release strategy also reduced scaffold encapsulation, increased wall thickness, and enhanced cellular infiltration. More broadly, the three components of the composite scaffold design (ECM gel, polymeric fibers, and PLGA microparticles) enable the tuning of performance characteristics, including scaffold bioactivity, degradation, mechanics, and drug release profile, all decisive factors to better address current limitations in abdominal wall repair or other soft tissue augmentation procedures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEA.2017.0349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5984564PMC
June 2018

In situ study on atomic mechanism of melting and freezing of single bismuth nanoparticles.

Nat Commun 2017 02 13;8:14462. Epub 2017 Feb 13.

Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics &Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, China.

Experimental study of the atomic mechanism in melting and freezing processes remains a formidable challenge. We report herein on a unique material system that allows for in situ growth of bismuth nanoparticles from the precursor compound SrBiTaO under an electron beam within a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Simultaneously, the melting and freezing processes within the nanoparticles are triggered and imaged in real time by the HRTEM. The images show atomic-scale evidence for point defect induced melting, and a freezing mechanism mediated by crystallization of an intermediate ordered liquid. During the melting and freezing, the formation of nucleation precursors, nucleation and growth, and the relaxation of the system, are directly observed. Based on these observations, an interaction-relaxation model is developed towards understanding the microscopic mechanism of the phase transitions, highlighting the importance of cooperative multiscale processes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5316836PMC
February 2017

Discrimination of alkyl and aromatic amine vapors using TTF-TCNQ based chemiresistive sensors.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2017 Jan;53(6):1132-1135

Nano Institute of Utah and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.

We report a chemiresistive sensor approach based on a TTF-TCNQ charge transfer material, which can real-time detect and distinguish the vapors of alkyl amine and aromatic amine species under ambient conditions, based on the dramatic difference in the kinetics of the electric current recovery processes after the exposure of the two amine species.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cc08237hDOI Listing
January 2017

Thermally induced recrystallization of MAPbI3 perovskite under methylamine atmosphere: an approach to fabricating large uniform crystalline grains.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2016 Sep 10;52(71):10743-6. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Nano Institute of Utah and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, 36 South Wasatch Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA.

A liquid to solid phase transition of methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3) under methylamine (MA) atmosphere at elevated temperatures was discovered, and used to form high quality and uniform thin films containing large, low defect crystal grains tens of microns in size.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cc04521aDOI Listing
September 2016

Photodoping and enhanced visible light absorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with a wide band gap oligomer.

Adv Mater 2015 Jan 4;27(1):162-7. Epub 2014 Nov 4.

Nano Institute of Utah and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112, USA.

Carbon nanotubes feature excellent electronic properties but narrow absorption bands limit their utility in certain optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaic cells. Here, the addition of a wide-bandgap gap oligomer enhances light absorption in the visible spectrum. Furthermore, the oligomer interacts with the carbon nanotube through a peculiar charge transfer, which provides insight into Type II heterojunctions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201404112DOI Listing
January 2015

Chronic AMP-activated protein kinase activation and a high-fat diet have an additive effect on mitochondria in rat skeletal muscle.

J Appl Physiol (1985) 2010 Aug 3;109(2):511-20. Epub 2010 Jun 3.

Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Birgham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA.

Factors that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle include AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), calcium, and circulating free fatty acids (FFAs). Chronic treatment with either 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR), a chemical activator of AMPK, or increasing circulating FFAs with a high-fat diet increases mitochondria in rat skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of chronic chemical activation of AMPK and high-fat feeding would have an additive effect on skeletal muscle mitochondria levels. We treated Wistar male rats with a high-fat diet (HF), AICAR injections (AICAR), or a high-fat diet and AICAR injections (HF + AICAR) for 6 wk. At the end of the treatment period, markers of mitochondrial content were examined in white quadriceps, red quadriceps, and soleus muscles, predominantly composed of unique muscle-fiber types. In white quadriceps, there was a cumulative effect of treatments on long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome c, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) protein, as well as on citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (beta-HAD) activity. In contrast, no additive effect was noted in the soleus, and in the red quadriceps only beta-HAD activity increased additively. The additive increase of mitochondrial markers observed in the white quadriceps may be explained by a combined effect of two separate mechanisms: high-fat diet-induced posttranscriptional increase in PGC-1alpha protein and AMPK-mediated increase in PGC-1alpha protein via a transcriptional mechanism. These data show that chronic chemical activation of AMPK and a high-fat diet have a muscle type specific additive effect on markers of fatty acid oxidation, the citric acid cycle, the electron transport chain, and transcriptional regulation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00126.2010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2928588PMC
August 2010

Effects of excess corticosterone on LKB1 and AMPK signaling in rat skeletal muscle.

J Appl Physiol (1985) 2010 Feb 3;108(2):298-305. Epub 2009 Dec 3.

Dept. of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Brigham Young Univ., Provo, Utah 84602, USA.

Cushing's syndrome is characterized by marked central obesity and insulin insensitivity, effects opposite those seen with chronic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. This study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to excess glucocorticoids influences LKB1/AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle. Corticosterone pellets were implanted subcutaneously in rats (hypercorticosteronemia, Hypercort) for 2 wk. Controls were sham operated and fed ad libitum or were sham operated and food restricted (pair-weighted group, Pair) to produce body weights similar to Hypercort rats. At the end of the 2-wk treatment period, rats were anesthetized, and the right gastrocnemius-plantaris (gastroc) and soleus muscles were removed. Left muscles were removed after electrical stimulation for 5 min. No significant differences were noted between treatment groups in ATP, creatine phosphate, or LKB1 activity. The alpha- and beta-subunit isoforms were not significantly influenced in gastroc by corticosterone treatment. Expression of the gamma3-subunit decreased, and gamma1- and gamma2-subunit expression increased. Both alpha2-AMPK and alpha1-AMPK activities were increased in the gastroc in response to electrical stimulation, but the magnitude of the increase was less for alpha2 in the Hypercort rats. Despite elevated plasma insulin and elevated plasma leptin in the Hypercort rats, phosphorylation of TBC1D1 was lower in both resting and stimulated muscle compared with controls. Malonyl-CoA content was elevated in gastroc muscles of resting Hypercort rats. These changes in response to excess glucocorticoids could be responsible, in part, for the decrease in insulin sensitivity and adiposity seen in Cushing's syndrome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00906.2009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2822674PMC
February 2010
-->