Publications by authors named "Daniel Hagege"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of polysaccharide elicitors on secondary metabolite production and antioxidant response in Hypericum perforatum L. shoot cultures.

ScientificWorldJournal 2014 11;2014:609649. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures, UPRES EA 1207, UFR-Faculté des Sciences, Université d'Orléans, rue de Chartres, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France.

The effects of polysaccharide elicitors such as chitin, pectin, and dextran on the production of phenylpropanoids (phenolics and flavonoids) and naphtodianthrones (hypericin and pseudohypericin) in Hypericum perforatum shoot cultures were studied. Nonenzymatic antioxidant properties (NEAOP) and peroxidase (POD) activity were also observed in shoot extracts. The activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone-flavanone isomerase (CHFI) were monitored to estimate channeling in phenylpropanoid/flavonoid pathways of elicited shoot cultures. A significant suppression of the production of total phenolics and flavonoids was observed in elicited shoots from day 14 to day 21 of postelicitation. This inhibition of phenylpropanoid production was probably due to the decrease in CHFI activity in elicited shoots. Pectin and dextran promoted accumulation of naphtodianthrones, particularly pseudohypericin, within 21 days of postelicitation. The enhanced accumulation of naphtodianthrones was positively correlated with an increase of PAL activity in elicited shoots. All tested elicitors induced NEAOP at day 7, while chitin and pectin showed increase in POD activity within the entire period of postelicitation. The POD activity was in significantly positive correlation with flavonoid and hypericin contents, suggesting a strong perturbation of the cell redox system and activation of defense responses in polysaccharide-elicited H. perforatum shoot cultures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/609649DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276679PMC
November 2015

Podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin in Juniperus bermudiana and 12 other Juniperus species: optimization of extraction, method validation, and quantification.

J Agric Food Chem 2011 Aug 15;59(15):8101-7. Epub 2011 Jul 15.

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures (LBLGC), UPRES EA 1207, Antenne Scientifique Universitaire de Chartres (ASUC), Université d'Orléans, Chartres, France.

The lignans podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin are secondary metabolites with potent pharmaceutical applications in cancer therapy. However, the supply of podophyllotoxin from its current natural source, Podophyllum hexandrum, is becoming increasingly problematic, and alternative sources are therefore urgently needed. So far, podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin have been found in some Juniperus species, although at low levels in most cases. Moreover, extraction protocols deserve optimization. This study aimed at developing and validating an efficient extraction protocol of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from Juniperus species and applying it to 13 Juniperus species, among which some had never been previously analyzed. Juniperus bermudiana was used for the development and validation of an extraction protocol for podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin allowing extraction yields of up to 22.6 mg/g DW of podophyllotoxin and 4.4 mg/g DW deoxypodophyllotoxin, the highest values found in leaf extract of Juniperus. The optimized extraction protocol and HPLC separation from DAD or MS detections were established and validated to investigate podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin contents in aerial parts of 12 other Juniperus species. This allowed either higher yields to be obtained in some species reported to contain these two compounds or the occurrence of these compounds in some other species to be reported for the first time. This efficient protocol allows effective extraction of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from aerial parts of Juniperus species, which could therefore constitute interesting alternative sources of these valuable metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf201410pDOI Listing
August 2011

Time course and amplitude of DNA methylation in the shoot apical meristem are critical points for bolting induction in sugar beet and bolting tolerance between genotypes.

J Exp Bot 2011 May 12;62(8):2585-97. Epub 2011 Jan 12.

Université d'Orléans, UFR-Faculté des Sciences, UPRES EA 1207 Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures, rue de Chartres, BP 6759, F-45067 Orléans, France.

An epigenetic control of vernalization has been demonstrated in annual plants such as Arabidopsis and cereals, but the situation remains unclear in biennial plants such as sugar beet that has an absolute requirement for vernalization. The role of DNA methylation in flowering induction and the identification of corresponding target loci also need to be clarified. In this context, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima) genotypes differing in bolting tolerance were submitted to various bolting conditions such as different temperatures and/or methylating drugs. DNA hypomethylating treatment was not sufficient to induce bolting while DNA hypermethylation treatment inhibits and delays bolting. Vernalizing and devernalizing temperatures were shown to affect bolting as well as DNA methylation levels in the shoot apical meristem. In addition, a negative correlation was established between bolting and DNA methylation. Genotypes considered as resistant or sensitive to bolting could also be distinguished by their DNA methylation levels. Finally, sugar beet homologues of the Arabidopsis vernalization genes FLC and VIN3 exhibited distinct DNA methylation marks during vernalization independently to the variations of global DNA methylation. These vernalization genes also displayed differences in mRNA accumulation and methylation profiles between genotypes resistant or sensitive to bolting. Taken together, the data suggest that the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations are critical points for the induction of sugar beet bolting and represent an epigenetic component of the genotypic bolting tolerance, opening up new perspectives for sugar beet breeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erq433DOI Listing
May 2011

Relationship between DNA methylation and histone acetylation levels, cell redox and cell differentiation states in sugarbeet lines.

Planta 2006 Sep 11;224(4):812-27. Epub 2006 Apr 11.

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures, Faculté des sciences, Université d'Orléans, UPRES EA 1207, rue de Chartres, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France.

In order to evaluate the permanent chromatin remodeling in plant allowing their high developmental plasticity, three sugarbeet cell lines (Beta vulgaris L. altissima) originating from the same mother plant and exhibiting graduate states of differentiation were analyzed. Cell differentiation has been estimated by the cell redox state characterized by 36 biochemical parameters as reactive oxygen species steady-state levels, peroxidation product contents and enzymatic or non-enzymatic protective systems. Chromatin remodeling has been estimated by the measurement of levels of DNA methylation, histone acetylation and corresponding enzyme activities that were shown to differ between cell lines. Furthermore, distinct loci related to proteins involved in cell cycle, gene expression regulation and cell redox state were shown by restriction landmark genome scanning or bisulfite sequencing to display differential methylation states in relation to the morphogenic capacity of the lines. DNA methylating, demethylating and/or histone acetylating treatments allowed to generate a collection of sugarbeet cell lines differing by their phenotypes (from organogenic to dedifferentiated), methylcytosine percentages (from 15.0 to 43.5%) and acetylated histone ratios (from 0.37 to 0.52). Correlations between methylcytosine or acetylated histone contents and levels of various parameters (23 or 7, respectively, out of 36) of the cell redox state could be established. These data lead to the identification of biomarkers of sugarbeet morphogenesis in vitro under epigenetic regulation and provide evidence for a connection between plant morphogenesis in vitro, cell redox state and epigenetic mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-006-0267-3DOI Listing
September 2006

DNA methylating and demethylating treatments modify phenotype and cell wall differentiation state in sugarbeet cell lines.

Plant Physiol Biochem 2005 Jul;43(7):681-91

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures, UPRES EA, 1207, rue de Chartres, BP 6759, Faculté des Sciences, Université d'Orléans, 45067 Orléans cedex 2, France.

In plants organogenesis, cell differentiation and dedifferentiation are fundamental processes allowing high developmental plasticity. Such plasticity involved epigenetic mechanisms but limited knowledge is available concerning quantitative aspects. Three sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L. altissima) cell lines originating from the same mother plant and exhibiting graduate states of morphogenesis were used to assess whether these differences could be related or not to changes in DNA methylation levels. Methylcytosine percentages from 18.3 to 28.8% and distinct levels of DNA methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.37) activities were shown in the three cell lines. The lowest methylcytosine percentage was associated to organogenesis. In order to test the plasticity of these cell lines, various treatments causing DNA hypo or hypermethylation were performed at different times and concentrations. In this collection of treated lines with+/-10% of methylcytosine percentages, loss of organogenic properties and cell dedifferentiation were observed. As cell wall formation fits well with cell differentiation state, the lignification process was further investigated in treated and untreated lines as a biochemical marker of the phenotypic changes. For example, peroxidase specific activities (EC 1.11.1.7) varied from 0.7 to 0.02 pkat mg(-1) of protein in organogenic and dedifferentiated lines, respectively. A negative relationship between peroxidase activities, incorporation of cell wall-bound phenolic compounds as ferulate and sinapate derivatives and methylcytosine percentages was obtained. This is the first biochemical evidence that phenotypic changes in plant cells induced by DNA hypo- or hypermethylating treatments are correlated in a linear relationship to modifications of the cell wall differentiation state.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2005.05.011DOI Listing
July 2005

Identification and quantification of hypericin and pseudohypericin in different Hypericum perforatum L. in vitro cultures.

Plant Physiol Biochem 2005 Jun;43(6):591-601

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures, UPRES EA 1207, UFR-Faculté des Sciences, Université d'Orléans, rue de Chartres, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans cedex 2, France.

Investigations have been made to develop an efficient protocol for micropropagation allowing to improve hypericin and pseudohypericin productions in Hypericum perforatum L. in vitro cultures. The role of growth regulator treatments has been particularly studied. Three in vitro culture lines with different morphological characteristics were obtained during H. perforatum micropropagation and referred to shoots, calli and plantlets according to their appearance. Multiplication and callogenesis from apical segments from sterile germinated seedlings were obtained on solid MS/B5 culture medium in the presence of N6-benzyladenine (BA) (0.1-5.0 mg/l BA). Regenerative potential of shoots was assessed on medium supplemented with auxins (0.05-1.0 mg/l), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). The main goal of the research was to summarize the influence of plant growth regulators on hypericin and pseudohypericin productions in in vitro cultures of Hypericum. A rapid method for naphtodianthrone quantification was developed. The use of a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with fluorescence detection was used. Identification of the compounds was confirmed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with electrospray in negative ion mode [M-H] . Calli, shoots and plantlets of H. perforatum produced hypericin and pseudohypericin. The concentration range of BA from 0.1 to 2.0 mg/l improved the production of hypericin (25-50 microg/g dry mass (DM)) and pseudohypericin (170-350 microg/g DM) in shoots. In callus cultures, BA (4.0-5.0 mg/l) did not changed hypericin contents (15-20 microg/g DM) but influenced pseudohypericin productions (120-180 microg/g DM). In the presence of auxins (IAA and IBA), Hypericum plantlets produced hypericin (30-100 microg/g DM) and pseudohypericin (120-400 microg/g DM). The presence of IAA did not influence naphtodianthrone productions in plantlets, but IBA decreased hypericin and pseudohypericin amounts in plantlets. The specific accumulation of the naphtodianthrones in in vitro cultures was influenced by phytohormonal supplementation of the medium. Results indicated that the production of hypericin and pseudohypericin could be increased by carefully adapted in vitro cultures. Hypericum in vitro cultures represent promising systems for hypericin and pseudohypericin productions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2005.05.005DOI Listing
June 2005