Publications by authors named "Daniel G Leino"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immuno-transcriptomic profiling of extracranial pediatric solid malignancies.

Cell Rep 2021 Nov;37(8):110047

University of Toronto Musculoskeletal Oncology Unit, Sinai Health System; Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

We perform an immunogenomics analysis utilizing whole-transcriptome sequencing of 657 pediatric extracranial solid cancer samples representing 14 diagnoses, and additionally utilize transcriptomes of 131 pediatric cancer cell lines and 147 normal tissue samples for comparison. We describe patterns of infiltrating immune cells, T cell receptor (TCR) clonal expansion, and translationally relevant immune checkpoints. We find that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and TCR counts vary widely across cancer types and within each diagnosis, and notably are significantly predictive of survival in osteosarcoma patients. We identify potential cancer-specific immunotherapeutic targets for adoptive cell therapies including cell-surface proteins, tumor germline antigens, and lineage-specific transcription factors. Using an orthogonal immunopeptidomics approach, we find several potential immunotherapeutic targets in osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma and validated PRAME as a bona fide multi-pediatric cancer target. Importantly, this work provides a critical framework for immune targeting of extracranial solid tumors using parallel immuno-transcriptomic and -peptidomic approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2021.110047DOI Listing
November 2021

ALK+ histiocytosis: a new clinicopathologic spectrum highlighting neurologic involvement and responses to ALK inhibition.

Blood 2021 Nov 2. Epub 2021 Nov 2.

Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital IRCCS, Rome, Italy.

ALK-related histiocytosis (formerly ALK-positive histiocytosis) is a rare subtype of histiocytic neoplasm first described in 2008 in three infants with multisystemic disease involving the liver and hematopoietic system. This entity has subsequently been documented in case reports and series to occupy a wider clinicopathologic spectrum with recurrent KIF5B-ALK fusions. The full clinicopathologic and molecular spectra of ALK-related histiocytosis remain, however, poorly characterized. Here, we describe the largest study of ALK-related histiocytosis to date, with detailed clinicopathologic data of 39 cases, including 37 cases with confirmed ALK rearrangements. The clinical spectrum comprised distinct clinical phenotypic groups: infants with multisystemic disease with liver and hematopoietic involvement, as originally described (Group 1A: 6/39), other patients with multisystemic disease (Group 1B: 10/39), and patients with single-system disease (Group 2: 23/39). Nineteen patients of the entire cohort (49%) had neurologic involvement (seven and twelve from Groups 1B and 2, respectively). Histology included classic xanthogranuloma features in almost one third of cases, whereas the majority displayed a more densely cellular, monomorphic appearance without lipidized histiocytes but sometimes more spindled or epithelioid morphology. Neoplastic histiocytes were positive for macrophage markers and ALK, and often conferred strong expression of phosphorylated-ERK, confirming MAPK pathway activation. KIF5B-ALK fusions were detected in 27 patients, while CLTC-ALK, TPM3-ALK, TFG-ALK, EML4-ALK and DCTN1-ALK fusions were identified in single cases. Robust and durable responses were observed in 11/11 patients treated with ALK inhibition, ten with neurologic involvement. This study presents the existing clinicopathologic and molecular landscape of ALK-related histiocytosis, and provides guidance for the clinical management of this emerging histiocytic entity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2021013338DOI Listing
November 2021

Isolated Upper Extremity Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Child.

Case Rep Radiol 2015 18;2015:813989. Epub 2015 Jun 18.

Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, 725 Welch Road, Room 1675, Stanford, CA 94305-5913, USA.

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-described complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplants. The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys. Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male. The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/813989DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4488545PMC
July 2015
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