Publications by authors named "Daniel Antoniello"

12 Publications

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Neurologic Syndromes Predict Higher In-Hospital Mortality in COVID-19.

Neurology 2021 03 18;96(11):e1527-e1538. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

From the Departments of Neurological Surgery (E.N.E., D.J.A., R.d.l.G.R., P.C., S.R.U., J. Benton, J.D., A.T., J.F.-T., J.L., R.H., E.B.), Neurology (N.P., A. Malaviya, D.F., D.A., D.L., J.G., V.F., J.R., C.E., M.M., A.B., M.F.M.), Radiology (R.Z., K.H., A. McClelland, J. Burns, A.E.), and Critical Care Medicine (R.M., M.G.), Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center (P.S., V.F., J.R.), Bronx, NY.

Objective: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is protean in its manifestations, affecting nearly every organ system. However, nervous system involvement and its effect on disease outcome are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to determine whether neurologic syndromes are associated with increased risk of inpatient mortality.

Methods: A total of 581 hospitalized patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, neurologic involvement, and brain imaging were compared to hospitalized non-neurologic patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Four patterns of neurologic manifestations were identified: acute stroke, new or recrudescent seizures, altered mentation with normal imaging, and neuro-COVID-19 complex. Factors present on admission were analyzed as potential predictors of in-hospital mortality, including sociodemographic variables, preexisting comorbidities, vital signs, laboratory values, and pattern of neurologic manifestations. Significant predictors were incorporated into a disease severity score. Patients with neurologic manifestations were matched with patients of the same age and disease severity to assess the risk of death.

Results: A total of 4,711 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were admitted to one medical system in New York City during a 6-week period. Of these, 581 (12%) had neurologic issues of sufficient concern to warrant neuroimaging. These patients were compared to 1,743 non-neurologic patients with COVID-19 matched for age and disease severity admitted during the same period. Patients with altered mentation (n = 258, = 0.04, odds ratio [OR] 1.39, confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.86) or radiologically confirmed stroke (n = 55, = 0.001, OR 3.1, CI 1.65-5.92) had a higher risk of mortality than age- and severity-matched controls.

Conclusions: The incidence of altered mentation or stroke on admission predicts a modest but significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality independent of disease severity. While other biomarker factors also predict mortality, measures to identify and treat such patients may be important in reducing overall mortality of COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000011356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8032378PMC
March 2021

Multiple Administrations of Intravenous Thrombolytic Therapy to a Stroke Mimic.

J Emerg Med 2020 Mar 3;58(3):e133-e136. Epub 2019 Dec 3.

Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.

Background: Patients who present emergently with focal neurological deficits concerning for acute ischemic stroke can be extremely challenging to diagnose and treat. Unnecessary administration of thrombolytics to potential stroke patients whose symptoms are not caused by an acute ischemic stroke-stroke mimics-may result in patient harm, although the overall risk of hemorrhagic complications among stroke mimics is low.

Case Report: We present a case of a stroke mimic patient with underlying psychiatric disease who was treated with intravenous alteplase on four separate occasions in four different emergency departments in the same city. Although he did not suffer hemorrhagic complications, this case highlights the importance of rapid exchange of health information across institutions to improve diagnostic quality and safety. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Increased awareness of stroke mimics by emergency physicians may improve diagnostic safety for a subset of high-risk patients. Establishing rapid cross-institutional communication pathways that are integrated into provider's workflows to convey essential patient health information has potential to improve stroke diagnostic decision-making and thus represents an important topic for health systems research in emergency medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2019.10.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7200287PMC
March 2020

The Phenomenology of Acute Anosognosia for Hemiplegia.

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 2020 30;32(3):259-265. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Montefiore Hospital/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y. (Antoniello, Gottesman).

Objective: After attempting to move a plegic limb, patients with anosognosia for hemiplegia (AHP) may claim that limb movement occurred, even though the limb remained motionless. The authors investigated the characteristics, natural history, and anatomical basis of AHP phenomenology.

Methods: Twenty-nine right-hemisphere stroke patients with acute anosognosia for hemiplegia (AHP) were prospectively assessed for the presence and characteristics of movement claims and observable behavior during movement attempts.

Results: AHP was transient, with the condition resolving in 68% of patients by 1 week. Patients made movement claims during 31% of unilateral movement attempts and 50% of bilateral movement attempts. Movement claims were idiosyncratic, lacked internal consistency within individual patients, and even dissociated from explicit denial, as several patients made movement claims after they began to explicitly acknowledge hemiplegia. Observable behavior during movement attempts revealed allochiria (moving the right arm instead of the left) in 31% of patients, signs of implicit knowledge of weakness in 24%, and intact intention in 34%. Lesion analysis revealed that allochiria was associated with inferior right parietal lobe damage.

Conclusions: These results highlight that heterogeneity, phenomenological complexity, and transience are hallmarks of AHP. This advances clinical AHP assessment by showing that assessment of performance, rather than just verbal response, uncovers multiple dimensions of AHP. Allochiria emerges as an anatomically distinct subcomponent of the disorder. These findings also have theoretical implications, because they do not lend support to unitary pathogenic models proposing that illusions of movement or impaired intention form the basis of AHP. Most patients rapidly improve, which should invigorate the search for typical compensatory mechanisms underlying spontaneous recovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.19010008DOI Listing
October 2019

Varicella Zoster Virus Vasculitis and Adult Cerebrovascular Disease.

Neurohospitalist 2019 Oct 28;9(4):203-208. Epub 2019 Apr 28.

Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

The role of Varicella zoster virus (VZV) in neurological illness, particularly cerebrovascular disease, has been increasingly recognized. Primary infection by VZV causes varicella (chickenpox), after which the virus remains latent in neuronal ganglia. Later, during aging or immunosuppression, the virus can reactivate causing zoster (shingles). Virus reactivation can also spread to cerebral arteries causing vasculitis and stroke. Zoster is a recognized risk factor for stroke, but stroke can occur without preceding zoster rash. The diagnosis of VZV cerebral vasculitis is established by abnormal brain imaging and confirmed by presence of viral DNA or anti-VZV antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment with acyclovir with or without prednisone is usually recommended. VZV vasculitis is a unique and uncommon stroke mechanism that has been under recognized. Careful diagnostic investigation may be warranted in a subgroup of patients with ischemic stroke to detect VZV vasculitis and initiate appropriate therapy. In the following review, we detail the clinical presentation of VZV vasculitis, diagnostic challenges in VZV detection, and suggest the ways to enhance recognition and treatment of this uncommon disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1941874419845732DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6739663PMC
October 2019

Limb Misidentification: A Clinical-Anatomical Prospective Study.

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 2017 28;29(3):284-288. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

From the Montefiore Hospital/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y. (DA, RG).

The misidentification of one's own limb (LM) after right hemisphere stroke is a striking phenomenon that is incompletely understood. The authors prospectively studied the natural history and anatomy of LM in 36 patients with hyperacute right middle cerebral artery infarct. Unlike in previous studies, rapid clinical assessment was prioritized. The authors found LM to be common and transient, involving 61% at onset, evolving to 15% at 1 week. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping found supramarginal gyrus (SMG) damage associated with LM. This substantiates the SMG's importance in LM and has broader implications for lesion analysis: timing matters. Rapid assessment of transient disorders minimizes false negatives, which can improve lesion analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.16090169DOI Listing
April 2018

Teaching video neuroimages: callosal apraxia: a straightforward model of ideomotor apraxia.

Neurology 2013 May;80(22):e239

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.

A 57-year-old right-handed man complained of difficulty using his hands post-coronary artery bypass graft (figure). Neurologic examination revealed signs of callosal disconnection without hemiparesis. When asked to perform limb gestures like "brush your teeth" or "wave goodbye," the right hand performed flawlessly whereas the left hand was severely apraxic (video on the Neurology Web site at www.neurology.org).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318294b319DOI Listing
May 2013

Isolated gait apraxia from an acute unilateral parasagittal lesion.

Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2011 Nov 31;113(9):782-4. Epub 2011 Aug 31.

Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clineuro.2011.07.031DOI Listing
November 2011

Improvement in aphasia scores after stroke is well predicted by initial severity.

Stroke 2010 Jul 10;41(7):1485-8. Epub 2010 Jun 10.

Stroke Division, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Background And Purpose: Most improvement from poststroke aphasia occurs within the first 3 months, but there remains unexplained variability in recovery. Recently, we reported a strong correlation between initial impairment and change scores in motor recovery at 90 days. We wanted to determine whether aphasia recovery (defined as a change from baseline to 90 days) shows a comparably strong correlation and whether the relation was similar to that in motor recovery.

Methods: Twenty-one stroke patients had aphasia scores on the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) obtained on stroke admission (WAB(initial)) and at 90 days (WAB(3 mo)). The relation between actual change (Delta) scores (defined as WAB(3 mo)- WAB(initial)) and WAB(initial) was calculated in multiple-regression analysis.

Results: Regression analysis demonstrated that WAB(initial) was highly correlated with DeltaWAB (R(2)=0.81, P<0.001) and that, in addition, the relation between WAB(initial) and DeltaWAB was proportional, such that patients recovered 0.73 of maximal potential recovery (WAB(maximum)-WAB(initial)).

Conclusions: We show that, like motor recovery, there is a highly predictable relation between aphasia recovery and initial impairment, which is also proportional in nature. The comparability of recovery from motor and language impairment suggests that common mechanisms may govern reduction of poststroke neurologic impairment across different functional domains and that they could be the focus of therapeutic intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.577338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2921806PMC
July 2010

Phantom limb after stroke: an underreported phenomenon.

Cortex 2010 Oct 24;46(9):1114-22. Epub 2009 Oct 24.

Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY, United States.

The presence of a phantom limb (PL) resulting from a cerebral lesion has been reported to be a rare event. No prior study, however, has systematically investigated the prevalence of this syndrome in a group of post-stroke individuals. Fifty post-stroke individuals were examined with structured interview/questionnaire to establish the presence and perceptual characteristics of PLs. We document the presence of phantom experiences in over half of these individuals (n=27). We provide details of these phantom experiences and further characterize these symptoms in terms of temporal qualities, posture, kinesthesia, and associated features. Twenty-two participants reported postural phantoms, which were perceived as illusions of limb position that commonly manifested while lying in bed at night - a time when visual input is removed from multi-sensory integration. Fourteen participants reported kinesthetic phantoms, with illusory movements ranging from simple single joint sensations to complex goal-directed phantom movements. A striking syndrome of near total volitional control of phantom movements was reported in four participants who had immobile plegic hands. Reduplicative phantom percepts were reported by only one participant. Similarly, phantom pain was present in only one individual - the sole participant with a pre-stroke limb amputation. The results suggest that stroke results in phantom experiences more commonly than previously described in the literature. We speculate that subtotal deafferance or defective motor efference after stroke may manifest intermittently as a PL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2009.10.003DOI Listing
October 2010

Variability in recovery from aphasia.

Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 2008 Nov;8(6):497-502

Levine Cerebral Localization Laboratory, Division of Stroke and Critical Care, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Clinicians have long recognized the enormous variability of recovery among patients with aphasia. Accordingly, the identification of specific factors most important in determining the extent of recovery has been the subject of many investigations. Yet, the reasons for two patients of the same age, nearly identical clinical presentations, and similar MRI findings having completely dissimilar recoveries are still unknown. It remains difficult for a clinician to make a valid prognosis of language recovery in an individual patient. This article provides a review of aphasia-recovery research and a framework for approaching the variability of recovery in clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11910-008-0079-xDOI Listing
November 2008

Attentional grasp in Parkinson disease.

Cogn Behav Neurol 2008 Sep;21(3):138-42

Department of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Background: Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have deficits in the neurotransmitter systems important for the normal allocation of attention. We sought to examine how the presence of PD influences the spatial allocation of reactive (bottom-up) and volitional (top-down) attention.

Methods: To assess the spatial allocation of attention, we used the line bisection task. When assessing "bottom-up" attention, lateral blinking lights were or were not present during the time the PD and normal subjects were attempting to perform line bisections. In the top-down condition, these subjects were asked to name the color of the laterally presented light before bisecting lines.

Results: In the bottom-up condition, when compared with control subjects, the participants with PD were not abnormally distracted, but in the top-down condition, imperative stimuli on the right side of the line seemed to influence the PD subjects' allocation of attention.

Conclusions: The results suggest that when voluntarily allocating attention rightward, PD patients have difficulty disengaging and/or reallocating their attention. This disengagement deficit might be related to the frontal-executive dysfunction associated with PD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0b013e3181864a35DOI Listing
September 2008