Publications by authors named "Dangpeng Xi"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

New SIMS U-Pb age constraints on the largest lake transgression event in the Songliao Basin, NE China.

PLoS One 2018 26;13(6):e0199507. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China.

The largest lake transgression event (LTE) associated with lake anoxic events (LAE) and periodic seawater incursion events (SWIE) in the Songliao Basin, northeastern China, occurred during deposition of the Cretaceous Nenjiang Formation. The Yaojia-Nenjiang Formation boundary (YNB) marks the beginning of the LTE, as well as LAE and SWIE. However, there is an absence of direct radioisotopic dating, and therefore the age of the YNB, as well as the beginning of LTE, together with their relationship with other geological events, is strongly debated. Here we present a new SIMS U-Pb zircon age from the lowermost Nenjiang Formation. The bentonite bed located 9.88 m above the YNB of the X1-4 borehole was analyzed. Twenty-five analyses of 25 zircons were conducted, which produced a weighted mean age of 85.5±0.6 Ma (MSWD = 0.87). Based on the average sediment accumulation rate, the age of the YNB is suggested to be 85.7 Ma, indicating that the LTE began in the Early Santonian. The new ages provide a precise chronostratigraphic framework for climatic and geological events. Our new results imply that the beginning of the LTE, LAE and SWIE occurred almost simultaneously with short-term sea level rise, and probably had a close relationship with OAE3.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0199507PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6019253PMC
April 2019

A gigantic marine ostracod (Crustacea: Myodocopa) trapped in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber.

Sci Rep 2018 01 22;8(1):1365. Epub 2018 Jan 22.

State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, 100083, China.

The mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (~99 Ma, Myanmar), widely known for exquisite preservation of theropods, also yields microfossils, which can provide important contextual information on paleoenvironment and amber formation. We report the first Cretaceous ostracod in amber-the gigantic (12.9 mm) right valve of an exclusively marine group (Myodocopa: Myodocopida) preserved in Burmese amber. Ostracods are usually small (0.5-2 mm), with well-calcified carapaces that provide an excellent fossil record extending to at least the Ordovician (~485 million years ago), but they are rarely encountered in amber. The new specimen effectively doubles the age of the ostracod amber record, offering the first representative of the Myodocopa, a weakly calcified group with a poor fossil record. Its carapace morphology is atypical and likely plesiomorphic. The preserved valve appears to be either a moulted exuvium or a dead and disarticulated specimen, and subsequent resin flows contain forest floor inclusions with terrestrial arthropods, i.e., fragmentary remains of spiders, and insect frass. These features resolve an enigmatic taphonomic pathway, and support a marginal marine setting for resin production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-19877-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778021PMC
January 2018
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