Publications by authors named "Dan Van Bui"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Treg and IL-1 receptor type 2-expressing CD4 T cell-deleted CD4 T cell fraction prevents the progression of age-related hearing loss in a mouse model.

J Neuroimmunol 2021 Aug 8;357:577628. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan.

We investigated the association between cellular immunity and age-related hearing loss (ARHL) development using three CD4 T cell fractions, namely, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg), interleukin 1 receptor type 2-expressing T cells (I1R2), and non-Treg non-I1R2 (nTnI) cells, which comprised Treg and I1R2-deleted CD4 T cells. Inoculation of the nTnI fraction into a ARHL murine model, not only prevented the development of ARHL and the degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons, but also suppressed serum nitric oxide, a source of oxidative stress. Further investigations on CD4 T cell fractions could provide novel insights into the prevention of aging, including presbycusis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroim.2021.577628DOI Listing
August 2021

The multiple functions and subpopulations of eosinophils in tissues under steady-state and pathological conditions.

Allergol Int 2021 Jan 24;70(1):9-18. Epub 2020 Nov 24.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japan.

Eosinophils not only play a critical role in the pathogenesis of eosinophil-associated diseases, but they also have multiple important biological functions, including the maintenance of homeostasis, host defense against infections, immune regulation through canonical Th1/Th2 balance modulation, and anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic activities. Recent studies have elucidated some emerging roles of eosinophils in steady-state conditions; for example, eosinophils contribute to adipose tissue metabolism and metabolic health through alternatively activated macrophages and the maintenance of plasma cells in intestinal tissue and bone marrow. Moreover, eosinophils exert tissue damage through eosinophil-derived cytotoxic mediators that are involved in eosinophilic airway inflammation, leading to diseases including asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps characterized by fibrin deposition through excessive response by eosinophils-induced. Thus, eosinophils possessing these various effects reflect the heterogenous features of these cells, which suggests the existence of distinct different subpopulations of eosinophils between steady-state and pathological conditions. Indeed, a recent study demonstrated that instead of dividing eosinophils by classical morphological changes into normodense and hypodense eosinophils, murine eosinophils from lung tissue can be phenotypically divided into two distinct subtypes: resident eosinophils and inducible eosinophils gated by Siglec-F CD62L CD101 and Siglec-F CD62L CD101, respectively. However, it is difficult to explain every function of eosinophils by rEos and iEos, and the relationship between the functions and subpopulations of eosinophils remains controversial. Here, we overview the multiple roles of eosinophils in the tissue and their biological behavior in steady-state and pathological conditions. We also discuss eosinophil subpopulations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.alit.2020.11.001DOI Listing
January 2021

Combination therapy with lenvatinib and radiation significantly inhibits thyroid cancer growth by uptake of tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

Exp Cell Res 2021 01 21;398(1):112390. Epub 2020 Nov 21.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka, 573-1010, Japan.

Although surgical treatment cures >90% of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients, the remaining patients, including advanced DTC cases, have poor clinical outcomes. These patients with inoperable disease have only two choices of radioactive iodine therapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as lenvatinib, which have a high incidence of treatment-related adverse events and can only prolong progression free survival by approximately 5-15 months. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of combination therapy with lenvatinib and radiation (CTLR) for DTC. CTLR synergistically inhibited cell replication and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice without apparent toxicities and suppressed the expression of proliferation marker (Ki-67). CTLR also induced apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Moreover, quantitative analysis of the intracellular uptake of lenvatinib using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry demonstrated that intracellular uptake of lenvatinib was significantly increased 48 h following irradiation. These data suggest that increased membrane permeability caused by irradiation increases the intracellular concentration of levatinib, contributing to the synergistic effect. This mechanism-based potential of combination therapy suggests a powerful new therapeutic strategy for advanced thyroid cancer with fewer side effects and might be a milestone for developing a regimen in clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yexcr.2020.112390DOI Listing
January 2021

Reduced Local Response to Corticosteroids in Eosinophilic Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Asthma.

Biomolecules 2020 02 18;10(2). Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Airway Disease Section, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010, Japan.

Eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (ECRS), a subgroup of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, is recognized as a refractory eosinophilic disorder characterized by both upper and lower airway inflammation. In some severe cases, disease control is poor, likely due to local steroid insensitivity. In this study, we focused on protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a key factor regulating glucocorticoid receptor (GR) nuclear translocation, and examined its association with local responses to corticosteroids in eosinophilic airway inflammation. Our results indicated reduced responses to corticosteroids in nasal epithelial cells from ECRS patients with asthma, which were also associated with decreased PP2A mRNA expression. Eosinophil peroxidase stimulates elevated PP2A phosphorylation levels, reducing PP2A protein expression and activity. In addition, mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators (TSLP, IL-25, IL-33, CCL4, CCL5, CCL11, and CCL26) associated with eosinophilic airway inflammation in epithelial cells were increased in nasal polyps (eosinophil-rich areas) compared with those in uncinate process tissues (eosinophil-poor areas) from the same patients. PP2A reduction by siRNA reduced GR nuclear translocation, whereas PP2A overexpression by plasmid transfection, or PP2A activation by formoterol, enhanced GR nuclear translocation. Collectively, our findings indicate that PP2A may represent a promising therapeutic target in refractory eosinophilic airway inflammation characterized by local steroid insensitivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biom10020326DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7072408PMC
February 2020

Increased CD69 expression on activated eosinophils in eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis correlates with clinical findings.

Allergol Int 2020 Apr 10;69(2):232-238. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japan.

Background: Eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (ECRS) is a subtype of chronic rhinosinusitis associated with asthma. CD69 is an important marker of activation for eosinophils. But, whether a correlation exist between the CD69 expression on eosinophils and clinical findings is unclear.

Methods: We performed quantitative PCR and/or flow cytometry using tissue and purified eosinophils from the blood and nasal polyps of 12 patients with ECRS and from 8 patients without ECRS (controls). We assessed clinical findings including nasal polyp (NP) scores, sinus CT findings, and pulmonary function test results, and examined their possible association with the CD69 expression. We also performed CD69 cross-linking experiments in mouse eosinophils to investigate the functional role of CD69.

Results: Levels of cytokine mRNAs (IL-4, -5, -10, and -13) were significantly higher in purified NP eosinophils and tissues from patients with ECRS than the levels of those in controls. The expressions of major basic protein (MBP), eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP), eosinophilic-derived neurotoxin (EDN), eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) in cytotoxic granules, and CD69 mRNA were significantly higher in purified eosinophils from NPs than in those from blood. We also found a correlation between expression of CD69 and clinical findings. Moreover, we found EPX release from mouse eosinophils following CD69 cross-linking.

Conclusions: These data suggest that increased CD69 expression by eosinophils is not only a biomarker for nasal obstruction and pulmonary dysfunction, but also a potential therapeutic target for patients with ECRS and asthma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.alit.2019.11.002DOI Listing
April 2020

Multiple Biological Aspects of Eosinophils in Host Defense, Eosinophil-Associated Diseases, Immunoregulation, and Homeostasis: Is Their Role Beneficial, Detrimental, Regulator, or Bystander?

Biol Pharm Bull 2020 ;43(1):20-30

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kansai Medical University.

Eosinophils are innate immune leukocytes and play important roles as terminal effector cells owing to their mediators, such as tissue-destructive cationic proteins, cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. Historically, they are not only considered an important player in host defense against parasitic, viral, fungal, and bacterial infections but also implicated in the pathogenesis of eosinophil-associated diseases, such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis, esophagitis, atopic dermatitis, myopathies, and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Moreover, recent studies have shown that eosinophils have an immune regulatory and homeostatic function. Interestingly, there is emerging evidence that eosinophils are accumulated through adoptive T-helper 2 (Th2) and innate Th2 responses, mechanisms of the classical allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated response, and group 2 innate lymphoid cell-derived interleukin-5, respectively. Furthermore, in agreement with current concepts of eosinophil subtypes, it has been shown that resident and phenotypically distinct eosinophils, i.e., resident and recruited inflammatory eosinophils, exist in inflamed sites, and each has different functions. Thus, the classical and novel studies suggest that eosinophils have multiple functions, and their roles may be altered by the environment. In this article, we review multiple biological aspects of eosinophils (novel and classical roles), including their beneficial and detrimental effects, immunoregulation, and homeostatic function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/bpb.b19-00892DOI Listing
November 2020

A Novel Approach for Investigating Upper Airway Hyperresponsiveness Using Micro-CT in Eosinophilic Upper Airway Inflammation such as Allergic Rhinitis Model.

Biomolecules 2019 06 27;9(7). Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata 573-1010, Japan.

Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) has been proposed as a feature of pathogenesis of eosinophilic upper airway inflammation such as allergic rhinitis (AR). The measurement system for upper AHR (AHR) in rodents is poorly developed, although measurements of nasal resistance have been reported. Here we assessed UAHR by direct measurement of swelling of the nasal mucosa induced by intranasal methacholine (MCh) using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT analysis was performed in both naïve and ovalbumin-induced AR mice following intranasal administration of MCh. The nasal cavity was segmented into two-dimensional horizontal and axial planes, and the data for nasal mucosa were acquired for the region of interest threshold. Then, a ratio between the nasal mucosa area and nasal cavity area was calculated as nasal mucosa index. Using our novel method, nasal cavity structure was clearly identified on micro-CT, and dose-dependent increased swelling of the nasal mucosa was observed upon MCh treatment. Moreover, the nasal mucosa index was significantly increased in AR mice compared to controls following MCh treatment, while ovalbumin administration did not affect swelling of the nasal mucosa in either group. This UAHR following MCh treatment was completely reversed by pretreatment with glucocorticoids. This novel approach using micro-CT for investigating UAHR reflects a precise assessment system for swelling of the nasal mucosa following MCh treatment; it not only sheds light on the mechanism of AR but also contributes to the development of new therapeutic drugs in AR patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biom9070252DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6681309PMC
June 2019

Eosinophilic Upper Airway Inflammation in a Murine Model Using an Adoptive Transfer System Induces Hyposmia and Epithelial Layer Injury with Convex Lesions.

Med Sci (Basel) 2019 Feb 5;7(2). Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata 573-1010, Japan.

Background: Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a refractory upper airway disease, accompanied mainly by eosinophilia and/or asthma. In addition, the disease correlates with a high rate of hyposmia, following a marked infiltration of eosinophils into the inflamed site, the paranasal sinus. Although eosinophils are known to contribute to the development of hyposmia and CRSwNP pathology, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether eosinophilic upper airway inflammation induces hyposmia and CRSwNP in a murine model using an adoptive transfer system.

Methods: To induce eosinophilic rhinosinusitis, splenocytes, including a high proportion (over 50%) of activated eosinophils (SPLhEos), were collected from interleukin-5 transgenic mice following double intraperitoneal injections of antigens, such as ovalbumin, house dust mite, or fungus. Activated SPLhEos with corresponding antigens were then transferred into the nasal cavity of recipient mice, which were sensitized and challenged by the corresponding antigen four times per week. Olfactory function, histopathological, and computed tomography (CT) analyses were performed 2 days after the final transfer of eosinophils.

Results: Hyposmia was induced significantly in mice that received SPLhEos transfer compared with healthy and allergic mice, but it did not promote morphological alteration of the paranasal sinus. Pathological analysis revealed that epithelial layer injury and metaplasia similar to polyps, with prominent eosinophil infiltration, was induced in recipient tissue. However, there was no nasal polyp development with interstitial edema that was similar to those recognized in human chronic rhinosinusitis.

Conclusions: This study supports the previously unsuspected contribution of eosinophils to CRS development in the murine model and suggests that murine-activated eosinophilic splenocytes contribute to the development of hyposmia due to more mucosal inflammation than physical airway obstruction and epithelial layer injury with convex lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medsci7020022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6409781PMC
February 2019
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