Publications by authors named "Dalad Siriwan"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Analysis of Phytonutrients, Anti-Mutagenic and Chemopreventive Effects of Tropical Fruit Extracts.

Foods 2021 Oct 27;10(11). Epub 2021 Oct 27.

Food and Nutrition Academic and Research Cluster, Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Thailand is located in the tropics and a wide variety of fruits are grown commercially. However, studies regarding the phytonutrients, anti-mutagenic and chemopreventive effects of these fruits are limited. Thus, phytochemical profiles and inhibition of key enzymes involved in obesity and diabetes, together with anti-mutagenic and chemopreventive properties of eight tropical fruit extracts cultivated in Thailand, including 'Kimju', 'Keenok', 'Pattavia', 'Phulae', 'Chanee', 'Monthong', 'Khaekdum' and 'Namdokmai' were investigated. Different cultivars were also compared. Results showed that 'Namdokmai' was the most antioxidant-rich extract containing abundant 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and its derivative, gallic acid, as the main phenolics. 'Namdokmai' also exhibited high inhibitory capacities (>60% inhibition under studied conditions) against lipase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase, key enzymes as drug targets for controlling obesity and type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, all fruit extracts suppressed food mutagen-induced DNA mutations assayed by the Ames test, especially 'Namdokmai' and 'Khaekdum' (>50% inhibition at 200 µg/plate). The 'Namdokmai' was also the most potent extract for suppression of cancer promotion (>90% inhibition at 200 µg/mL) followed by 'Kimju', 'Keenok' and 'Khaekdum'. Results potentially indicated that fruit intake after overcooked meat consumption might supplement nutrients and fiber and also reduce DNA mutation sources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods10112600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8621897PMC
October 2021

The Effect of Sacred Lotus () and Its Mixtures on Phenolic Profiles, Antioxidant Activities, and Inhibitions of the Key Enzymes Relevant to Alzheimer's Disease.

Molecules 2020 Aug 14;25(16). Epub 2020 Aug 14.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Sacred lotus () has long been used as a food source and ingredient for traditional herbal remedies. Plant parts contain neuroprotective agents that interact with specific targets to inhibit Alzheimer's disease (AD). Organic solvents including methanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, and -butanol, are widely employed for extraction of sacred lotus but impact food safety. Seed embryo, flower stalk, stamen, old leaf, petal, and leaf stalk of sacred lotus were extracted using hot water (aqueous extraction). The extractions were analyzed for their bioactive constituents, antioxidant and anti-AD properties as key enzyme inhibitory activities toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-secretase 1 (BACE-1). Results showed that the sacred lotus stamen exhibited significant amounts of phenolics, including phenolic acids and flavonoids, that contributed to high antioxidant activity via both single electron transfer (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms, with anti-AChE, anti-BChE, and anti-BACE-1 activities. To enhance utilization of other sacred lotus parts, a combination of stamen, old leaf and petal as the three sacred lotus plant components with the highest phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and enzyme inhibitory properties was analyzed. Antagonist interaction was observed, possibly from flavonoids-flavonoids interaction. Further in-depth elucidation of this issue is required. Findings demonstrated that an aqueous extract of the stamen has potential for application as a functional food to mitigate the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25163713DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7463813PMC
August 2020

Comparison of Phytochemicals, Antioxidant, and In Vitro Anti-Alzheimer Properties of Twenty-Seven spp. Cultivated in Thailand.

Molecules 2020 Jun 3;25(11). Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. To fight the disease, natural products, including mulberry, with antioxidant activities and inhibitory activities against key enzymes (acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and beta-secretase 1 (BACE-1)) are of interest. However, even in the same cultivars, mulberry trees grown in different populated locations might possess disparate amounts of phytochemical profiles, leading to dissimilar health properties, which cause problems when comparing different cultivars of mulberry. Therefore, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the phytochemicals, antioxidant activities, and inhibitory activities against AChE, BChE, and BACE-1, of twenty-seven spp. cultivated in the same planting area in Thailand. The results suggested that fruit samples were rich in phenolics, especially cyanidin, kuromanin, and keracyanin. Besides, the aqueous fruit extracts exhibited antioxidant activities, both in single electron transfer (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms, while strong inhibitory activities against AD key enzymes were observed. Interestingly, among the twenty-seven spp., sp. code SKSM 810191 with high phytochemicals, antioxidant activities and in vitro anti-AD properties is a promising cultivar for further developed as a potential mulberry resource with health benefits against AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25112600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7321130PMC
June 2020

Mulberry Fruit Cultivar 'Chiang Mai' Prevents Beta-Amyloid Toxicity in PC12 Neuronal Cells and in a Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

Molecules 2020 Apr 16;25(8). Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by chronic neuron loss and cognitive problems. Aggregated amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, a product of cleaved amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta-secretase 1 (BACE-1), have been indicated for the progressive pathogenesis of AD. Currently, screening for anti-AD compounds in foodstuffs is increasing, with promising results. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the extraction conditions, phytochemical contents, and anti-AD properties, targeting Aβ peptides of cf. 'Chiang Mai' (MNCM) both in vitro and in vivo. Data showed that the aqueous extract of MNCM contained high amounts of cyanidin, keracyanin, and kuromanin as anthocyanidin and anthocyanins. The extract also strongly inhibited cholinesterases and BACE-1 in vitro. Moreover, MNCM extract prevented Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and promoted neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells. Interestingly, MNCM extract reduced Aβ peptides and improved locomotory coordination of co-expressing human APP and BACE-1, specifically in the brain. These findings suggest that MNCM may be useful as an AD preventive agent by targeting Aβ formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081837DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7221829PMC
April 2020

Properties and bioavailability assessment of shrimp astaxanthin loaded liposomes.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2019 Apr 30;28(2):529-537. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

1Department of Fishery Products, Faculty of Fisheries, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, 10900 Thailand.

This study aimed to investigate the effects of phospholipid composition on the properties and bioavailability of astaxanthin-loaded liposomes using cell culture. Two mixtures of phospholipids with different proportions of phosphatidylcholine (PC, 23% and 70%) were used at various concentrations (0.8, 1.6, and 2.0% w/v) to prepare astaxanthin-loaded liposomes, which were investigated for entrapment efficiency (EE), antioxidant activity, morphology and changes in astaxanthin properties during a storage period of 8 weeks at 4 °C. Furthermore, Caco-2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells were employed to examine the cellular uptake of astaxanthin-loaded liposomes. The highest EE was observed with astaxanthin-loaded liposomes containing 70% PC, and used at the concentration of 2.0% w/v. Liposomes maintained the antioxidant activity of astaxanthin. All liposomal preparations were non-toxic. Cellular uptake of astaxanthin-loaded liposomes containing 70% PC was significantly higher than that of 23% PC-containing liposomes ( < 0.05).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-018-0495-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6431342PMC
April 2019

Effect of epoxides and α-methylene-γ-lactone skeleton of sesquiterpenes from yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) leaves on caspase-dependent apoptosis and NF-κB inhibition in human cercival cancer cells.

Fitoterapia 2011 Oct 20;82(7):1093-101. Epub 2011 Jul 20.

The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8566, Japan.

The present study investigated the cytotoxicity of enhydrin (1), uvedalin (2) and sonchifolin (3) in cervical cancer cells. We have found that SLs 1-3 in doses in range of 0.22-10 μM inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in both a dose- and time-dependent fashion. A significant cell death induction was supported by morphological studies. The apoptotic effect is associated with caspase-3/7 activation and NF-кB inhibition. Interestingly, enhydrin possessing two epoxide units was found to be the most cytotoxic compound. Therefore it can be assumed that number of epoxides and existence of α-methylene-γ-lactone moiety are essential for the acceleration of apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fitote.2011.07.007DOI Listing
October 2011
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