Publications by authors named "Daisy Walter"

14 Publications

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Reply to Dong et al.

Endoscopy 2019 07 27;51(7):700. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-0919-4867DOI Listing
July 2019

Dilation or biodegradable stent placement for recurrent benign esophageal strictures: a randomized controlled trial.

Endoscopy 2018 12 8;50(12):1146-1155. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Dilation is the standard of care for recurrent benign esophageal strictures (BES). Biodegradable stents may prolong the effect of dilation and reduce recurrences. Efficacy and safety of dilation and biodegradable stent placement early in the treatment algorithm of recurrent BES were compared.

Methods: This multicenter, randomized study enrolled patients with BES treated with previous dilations to ≥ 16 mm. The primary end point was number of repeat endoscopic dilations for recurrent stricture within 3 and 6 months. Secondary outcomes through 12 months included safety, time to first dilation for recurrent stricture, dysphagia, and level of activity.

Results: At 3 months, the biodegradable stent group (n = 32) underwent significantly fewer endoscopic dilations for recurrent stricture compared with the dilation group (n = 34;  < 0.001). By 6 months, the groups were similar. The number of patients experiencing adverse events was similar between the groups. Two patients in the biodegradable stent group died after developing tracheoesophageal fistulas at 95 and 96 days post-placement; no deaths were attributed to the stent. Median time to first dilation of recurrent stricture for the biodegradable stent group was significantly longer (106 vs. 41.5 days;  = 0.003). Dysphagia scores improved for both groups. Patients in the biodegradable stent group had a significantly higher level of activity through 12 months ( < 0.001).

Conclusion: Biodegradable stent placement is associated with temporary reduction in number of repeat dilations and prolonged time to recurrent dysphagia compared with dilation. Additional studies are needed to better define the exact role of biodegradable stent placement to treat recurrent BES.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-0602-4169DOI Listing
December 2018

Electromagnetic-guided placement of nasoduodenal feeding tubes versus endoscopic placement: a randomized, multicenter trial.

Gastrointest Endosc 2018 Jan 1;87(1):110-118. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background And Aims: Electromagnetic-guided placement (EMP) of a nasoduodenal feeding tube by trained nurses is an attractive alternative to EGD-guided placement (EGDP). We aimed to compare EMP and EGDP in outpatients, ward patients, and critically ill patients with normal upper GI anatomy.

Methods: In 3 centers with no prior experience in EMP, patients were randomized to placement of a single-lumen nasoduodenal feeding tube either with EGDP or EMP. The primary endpoint was post-pyloric position of the tube on abdominal radiography. Patients were followed for 10 days to assess patency and adverse events. The analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat principle.

Results: In total, 160 patients were randomized to EGDP (N = 76) or EMP (N = 84). Three patients withdrew informed consent, and no abdominal radiography was performed in 2 patients. Thus, 155 patients (59 intensive care unit, 38%) were included in the analyses. Rates of post-pyloric tube position between EGDP and EMP were comparable (79% vs 82%, odds ratio 1.16; 90% confidence interval, 0.58-2.38; P = .72). Adverse events were observed in 4 patients after EMP (hypoxia, GI blood loss, atrial fibrillation, abdominal pain) and in 4 after EGDP (epistaxis N = 2, GI blood loss, hypoxia). Costs of tube placements were lower for EMP compared with EGDP: $519.09 versus $622.49, respectively (P = .04).

Conclusions: Success rates and safety of EMP and EGDP in patients with normal upper GI anatomy were comparable. Lower costs and potential logistic advantages may drive centers to adopt EMP as their new standard of care. (Clinical trial registration number: NTR4286.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2017.05.033DOI Listing
January 2018

Higher quality of life after metal stent placement compared with plastic stent placement for malignant extrahepatic bile duct obstruction: a randomized controlled trial.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2017 Feb;29(2):231-237

aDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology bJulius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center cDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Diakonessen Hospital, Utrecht dDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem eDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein fDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Gelderse Vallei Hospital, Ede gDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zorg Groep Twente, Hengelo hDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Meander Medical Center, Amersfoort iDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Haga Hospital, Den Haag jDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Canisius Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen kDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Dordrecht lDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede mDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam nDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Amphia Hospital, Breda oDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, VieCuri Hospital, Venlods pDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Martini Hospital qDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen rDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Den Bosch sDepartment of Decision Analysis, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands tDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Objective: For palliation of extrahepatic bile duct obstruction, self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are superior to plastic stents in terms of stent patency and occurrence of stent dysfunction. We assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after stent placement to investigate whether this also results in a difference in HRQoL between patients treated with a plastic stent or SEMS.

Patients And Methods: This randomized multicenter trial included 219 patients who were randomized to receive plastic stent (n=73) or SEMS [uncovered (n=75) and covered (n=71); n=146] placement. HRQoL was assessed with two general questionnaires (EQ-5D-3L and QLQ-C30) and one disease-specific questionnaire (PAN-26). Scores were analyzed using linear mixed model regression and included all patients with baseline and at least one follow-up measurement.

Results: HRQoL data were available in 140 of 219 patients (64%); 71 patients (32%) declined participation and in eight patients (4%) only baseline questionnaires were available. On the QLQ-C30, the interaction between follow-up time and type of stent was significantly different on two of five functional scales [physical functioning (P=0.004) and emotional functioning (P=0.01)] in favor of patients with a SEMS. In addition, patients with SEMS reported significantly less frequent symptoms of fatigue (P=0.01), loss of appetite (P=0.02), and nausea and vomiting (0.04) over time. The EQ-VAS score decreased with time in both treatment groups, indicating a statistically significant decrease in HRQoL over time.

Conclusion: In patients with inoperable malignant extrahepatic bile duct obstruction, SEMS placement results in better scores for general and disease-specific HRQoL over time compared with plastic stent placement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MEG.0000000000000762DOI Listing
February 2017

Balloon dilatation with or without intralesional and oral corticosteroids for anastomotic Crohn's disease strictures.

J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2015 Dec;24(4):537-9

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.15403/jgld.2014.1121.244.havDOI Listing
December 2015

EUS-guided gall bladder drainage with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a prospective long-term evaluation.

Gut 2016 Jan 3;65(1):6-8. Epub 2015 Jun 3.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2015-309925DOI Listing
January 2016

Cost Efficacy of Metal Stents for Palliation of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Obstruction in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Gastroenterology 2015 Jul 17;149(1):130-8. Epub 2015 Mar 17.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background & Aims: Endoscopic stents are placed for palliation of extrahepatic bile duct obstruction. Although self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) remain patent longer than plastic stents, they are more expensive. We aimed to evaluate which type of stent (plastic, uncovered SEMS [uSEMS], or partially covered SEMS [pcSEMS]) is the most effective and we assessed costs.

Methods: We performed a multicenter randomized trial in 219 patients at 18 hospitals in The Netherlands from February 2008 through February 2013. Patients were assigned randomly for placement of a plastic stent (n = 73), uSEMS (n = 75), or pcSEMS (n = 71) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Patients were followed up for up to 1 year. Researchers were not blinded to groups. The main study end points included functional stent time and costs.

Results: The mean functional stent times were 172 days for plastic stents, 288 days for uSEMS, and 299 days for pcSEMS (P < .005 for uSEMS and pcSEMS vs plastic). The initial placement of plastic stents (€1042 or $1106) cost significantly less than placement of SEMS (€1973 or $2094) (P = .001). However, the total cost per patient at the end of the follow-up period did not differ significantly between plastic stents (€7320 or $7770) and SEMS (€6932 or $7356) (P = .61). Furthermore, in patients with short survival times (≤3 mo) or metastatic disease, the total cost per patient did not differ between plastic stents and SEMS. No differences in costs were found between pcSEMS and uSEMS.

Conclusions: Although placement of SEMS (uncovered or partially covered) for palliation of extrahepatic bile duct obstruction initially is more expensive than placement of plastic stents, SEMS have longer functional time. The total costs after 1 year do not differ significantly with stent type. Dutch Clinical Trial Registration no: NTR1361.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2015.03.012DOI Listing
July 2015

A fully covered self-expandable metal stent with antimigration features for benign biliary strictures: a prospective, multicenter cohort study.

Gastrointest Endosc 2015 May 7;81(5):1197-203. Epub 2015 Feb 7.

Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Background: Self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are increasingly used for the treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBSs). A new fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) with flared ends and high conformability was designed to prevent migration of the stent.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a novel FCSEMS with antimigration features.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting: Five hospitals in the Netherlands and Belgium.

Patients: Consecutive patients with BBS.

Intervention: FCSEMS placement for 3 months.

Main Outcome Measurements: Initial and long term clinical success, stent migration rate and safety.

Results: Thirty-eight patients (24 men; mean age, 53 ± 16 years) were included. Stent placement was technically successful in 37 patients (97%). Two patients died of an unrelated cause before stent removal, and no data on these patients were available on stricture resolution. Initial clinical success was achieved in 28 of 35 patients (80%). During follow-up after stent removal, a symptomatic recurrent stricture developed in 6 of 28 patients (21%). Overall, the long-term clinical success rate was 63% (22 of 35 patients). Stent migration occurred in 11 of 35 patients (31%), including 5 symptomatic (14%) and 6 asymptomatic (17%) migrations. In total, 11 serious adverse events occurred in 10 patients (29%), with cholangitis (n = 5) being most common.

Limitations: Nonrandomized study design.

Conclusions: Good initial clinical success was achieved after placement of this novel FCSEMS, but stricture recurrence was in the upper range compared with other FCSEMSs. The antimigration design could not prevent migration in a significant number of patients with a persisting stricture.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2014.10.026DOI Listing
May 2015

A novel lumen-apposing metal stent for endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: a prospective cohort study.

Endoscopy 2015 Jan 30;47(1):63-7. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Department Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Background And Study Aims: A novel large-diameter, lumen-apposing, self-expanding metal stent with bilateral flanges was recently developed for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transmural drainage of symptomatic pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this stent in a large cohort.

Patients And Methods: Patients with a PFC undergoing EUS-guided drainage with this novel stent were prospectively enrolled in this multicenter cohort study.

Results: There were 61 patients: 46 patients (75 %) with walled-off necrosis (WON) and 15 (25 %) with a pancreatic pseudocyst. Stent placement was technically successful in 60 patients (98 %, 95 %CI 95 % - 100 %). Clinical success, defined as resolution of clinical symptoms in combination with a decrease in the PFC size to ≤ 2 cm on imaging, was achieved in 93 % of patients with a pancreatic pseudocyst (95 %CI 77 % - 100 %) and in 81 % of patients with WON (95 %CI 69 % - 94 %). Treatment failure occurred in nine patients (16 %, 95 %CI 6 % - 26 %), including four patients who required surgical intervention. Stent removal was performed in 82 % of patients after a median of 32 days (range 2 - 178) and was rated as easy in all but one patient. In 10 patients, endoscopic stent removal was not performed because of stent migration (n = 3), stent dislodgement during necrosectomy (n = 3), stent removal during surgery (n = 2), or refusal by the patient (n = 2). In total, five major complications were reported (9 %, 95 %CI 2 % - 16 %), including PFC infection (n = 4) and perforation (n = 1).

Conclusion: EUS-guided drainage using this novel stent is feasible and the clinical results obtained are promising with a low major complication rate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1378113DOI Listing
January 2015

A new fully covered metal stent with anti-migration features for the treatment of malignant dysphagia.

Endoscopy 2014 Dec 30;46(12):1101-5. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background And Study Aims: A new esophageal stent with two anti-migration features was developed to minimize migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of this stent in patients with malignant dysphagia.

Patients And Methods: A total of 40 patients with dysphagia due to a malignant obstruction of the esophagus were prospectively enrolled in this cohort study.

Results: Stent placement was technically successful in 39 patients (98 %). The median dysphagia-free time after stent placement was 220 days (95 % confidence interval 94 - 345 days). Nine patients (23 %) experienced recurrent dysphagia due to tissue overgrowth (n = 2), stent fracture (n = 1), and partial (n = 5) or complete (n = 1) stent migration. A total of 16 serious adverse events occurred in 14 patients (36 %), with hemorrhage (n = 3) and severe nausea or vomiting (n = 3) being the most common causes.

Conclusions: This new stent design was effective for the palliation of malignant dysphagia and had a low rate of recurrent dysphagia. However, despite the anti-migration features, stent migration was still a major cause of recurrent dysphagia. Furthermore, treatment was associated with a high adverse event rate. Dutch Trial Registration (NTR 3313).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1377632DOI Listing
December 2014

Biodegradable stent placement before neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy as a bridge to surgery in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer.

Gastrointest Endosc 2014 Nov 26;80(5):908-13. Epub 2014 Jul 26.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2014.06.004DOI Listing
November 2014

High proximal migration rate of a partially covered "big cup" duodenal stent in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

Endoscopy 2014 Feb 11;46(2):158-61. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has emerged as a palliative treatment for patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Recently, a new partially covered "big cup" SEMS has been developed to prevent both stent migration and tissue ingrowth. The aim of the study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of this SEMS in a cohort of patients with incurable malignant GOO. The study was terminated prematurely due to three proximal stent migrations in six patients. Migrations occurred at 2, 4, and 29 days, respectively, and necessitated endoscopic removal and placement of another SEMS. The remaining three patients had a patent SEMS at the end of follow-up. The high proximal migration rate of this new SEMS should be taken into account when considering routine clinical use in malignant GOO. Further research is warranted in order to find an optimal stent design that prevents both stent migration and tumor ingrowth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1359023DOI Listing
February 2014

Platelets of patients with chronic kidney disease demonstrate deficient platelet reactivity in vitro.

BMC Nephrol 2012 Sep 28;13:127. Epub 2012 Sep 28.

Department of Clinical Chemistry and Hematology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584, CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: In patients with chronic kidney disease studies focusing on platelet function and properties often are non-conclusive whereas only few studies use functional platelet tests. In this study we evaluated a recently developed functional flow cytometry based assay for the analysis of platelet function in chronic kidney disease.

Methods: Platelet reactivity was measured using flow cytometric analysis. Platelets in whole blood were triggered with different concentrations of agonists (TRAP, ADP, CRP). Platelet activation was quantified with staining for P-selectin, measuring the mean fluorescence intensity. Area under the curve and the concentration of half-maximal response were determined.

Results: We studied 23 patients with chronic kidney disease (9 patients with cardiorenal failure and 14 patients with end stage renal disease) and 19 healthy controls. Expression of P-selectin on the platelet surface measured as mean fluorescence intensity was significantly less in chronic kidney disease patients compared to controls after maximal stimulation with TRAP (9.7 (7.9-10.8) vs. 11.4 (9.2-12.2), P=0.032), ADP (1.6 (1.2-2.1) vs. 2.6 (1.9-3.5), P=0.002) and CRP (9.2 (8.5-10.8) vs. 11.5 (9.5-12.9), P=0.004). Also the area under the curve was significantly different. There was no significant difference in half-maximal response between both groups.

Conclusion: In this study we found that patients with chronic kidney disease show reduced platelet reactivity in response of ADP, TRAP and CRP compared to controls. These results contribute to our understanding of the aberrant platelet function observed in patients with chronic kidney disease and emphasize the significance of using functional whole blood platelet activation assays.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2369-13-127DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3473261PMC
September 2012