Publications by authors named "Daishi Kabemura"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Decline During Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin Therapy in Hepatitis B Inactive Carriers Who were co-infected with Hepatitis C.

Intern Med 2021 May 14. Epub 2021 May 14.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Japan.

Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy carries a potential risk of inducing hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. However, the HBV kinetics during and after DAA therapy in patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HBV remain unknown. We retrospectively evaluated the HBV kinetics during and after sofosbuvir/ribavirin therapy in four HBV inactive carriers co-infected with HCV. HCV was eradicated in all patients. Changes in HBV-DNA levels during treatment differed among patients. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels uniformly decreased (mean -0.530 logIU/mL) by the end of treatment and returned to near the baseline in all patients. Sofosbuvir/ribavirin therapy thus demonstrated a suppressive effect on HBsAg.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2169/internalmedicine.7337-21DOI Listing
May 2021

Elevated serum tyrosine concentration is associated with a poor prognosis among patients with liver cirrhosis.

Hepatol Res 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.

Aim: Chronic liver insufficiency is often associated with changes in amino acid metabolism. We evaluated whether change in serum amino acid concentrations had prognostic value among patients with liver cirrhosis.

Methods: This retrospective study evaluated 158 patients who had been hospitalized with cirrhosis. Baseline serum concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and tyrosine, as well as the BCAA-to-tyrosine ratio, were evaluated. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratios for factors that were associated with mortality or liver transplantation.

Results: Among the 158 patients, baseline measurements showed decreased serum BCAA concentrations for 59 patients (37.3%), elevated serum tyrosine concentrations for 80 patients (50.6%), and a decreased BCAA-to-tyrosine ratio for 114 patients (72.2%). During a median follow-up period of 3.0 years, death or liver transplantation occurred at a rate of 0.136 cases/1 person-year. Multivariable analysis showed that transplant-free survival was independently predicted by older age, male sex, comorbid hepatocellular carcinoma, Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, and serum tyrosine concentration. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a serum tyrosine concentration of >110 µmol/L was the optimal cut-off value for predicting transplant-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval 1.15-3.11, p = 0.012). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant difference in the 5-year transplant-free survival probability between patients with high and low serum tyrosine concentrations (42.1% vs. 60.7%, p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Elevated serum tyrosine concentration, but not changes in serum BCAA concentration or the BCAA-to-tyrosine ratio, may indicate a high risk of death or liver transplantation for patients with liver cirrhosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hepr.13651DOI Listing
May 2021