Publications by authors named "Daire J Hurley"

8 Publications

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Paediatric ankle cartilage lesions: Proceedings of the International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle.

J ISAKOS 2022 Apr 13. Epub 2022 Apr 13.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Background: The evidence supporting best practice guidelines in the field of cartilage repair of the ankle are based on both low quality and low levels of evidence. Therefore, an international consensus group of experts was convened to collaboratively advance toward consensus opinions based on the best available evidence on key topics within cartilage repair of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to report the consensus statements on "Pediatric Ankle Cartilage Lesions" developed at the 2019 International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle.

Methods: Forty-three international experts in cartilage repair of the ankle representing 20 countries convened to participate in a process based on the Delphi method of achieving consensus. Questions and statements were drafted within four working groups focusing on specific topics within cartilage repair of the ankle, after which a comprehensive literature review was performed and the available evidence for each statement was graded. Discussion and debate occurred in cases where statements were not agreed upon in unanimous fashion within the working groups. A final vote was then held, and the strength of consensus was characterised as follows: consensus: 51-74%; strong consensus: 75-99%; unanimous: 100%.

Results: A total of 12 statements on paediatric ankle cartilage lesions reached consensus during the 2019 International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle. Five achieved unanimous support, and seven reached strong consensus (>75% agreement). All statements reached at least 84% agreement.

Conclusions: This international consensus derived from leaders in the field will assist clinicians with the management of paediatric ankle cartilage lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jisako.2022.04.001DOI Listing
April 2022

Terminology for osteochondral lesions of the ankle: proceedings of the International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle.

J ISAKOS 2022 04 14;7(2):62-66. Epub 2022 Jan 14.

Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.

Background: The evidence supporting best practice guidelines in the field of cartilage repair of the ankle is based on both low quality and low levels of evidence. Therefore, an international consensus group of experts was convened to collaboratively advance toward consensus opinions based on the best available evidence on key topics within cartilage repair of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to report the consensus statements on "terminology for osteochondral lesions of the ankle" developed at the 2019 International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle.

Methods: Forty-three international experts in cartilage repair of the ankle representing 20 countries were convened and participated in a process based on the Delphi method of achieving consensus. Questions and statements were drafted within four working groups focusing on specific topics within cartilage repair of the ankle, after which a comprehensive literature review was performed, and the available evidence for each statement was graded. Discussion and debate occurred in cases where statements were not agreed on in unanimous fashion within the working groups. A final vote was then held, and the strength of consensus was characterised as follows: consensus, 51%-74%; strong consensus, 75%-99%; unanimous, 100%.

Results: A total of 11 statements on terminology and classification reached consensus during the 2019 International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle. Definitions are provided for osseous, chondral and osteochondral lesions, as well as bone marrow stimulation and injury chronicity, among others. An osteochondral lesion of the talus can be abbreviated as OLT.

Conclusions: This international consensus derived from leaders in the field will assist clinicians with the appropriate terminology for osteochondral lesions of the ankle.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jisako.2021.12.001DOI Listing
April 2022

MRI findings in atraumatic shoulder pain-patterns of disease correlated with age and gender.

Ir J Med Sci 2022 May 10. Epub 2022 May 10.

Department of Radiology, National Orthopaedic Hospital, CappaghDublin 11, Finglas, Ireland.

Background: The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons which support the shoulder joint. Rotator cuff disease is a frequent cause of morbidity in adulthood.

Aims: The aims of his study are to determine the prevalence and patterns of rotator cuff derangement in symptomatic patients using MRI and to attempt to correlate identified patterns of disease with age and gender METHODS: Five hundred ninety-seven patients attending for MRI of the shoulder with atraumatic shoulder pain were included for study. Patients' age and gender was recorded. Record was made of the presence or absence of rotator cuff derangement and of degenerative change in the AC and glenohumeral joints. Correlation was made between age and gender.

Results: There were 358 males (60%) and 239 females (40%) with a mean age of 49.4 ± 17.1 years. Subacromial bursitis was identified in 517 patients. A normal supraspinatus tendon was identified in 219 patients and supraspinatus full thickness tearing was identified in 102 patients. A normal AC joint was identified in 267 patients while degenerative AC joint changes were identified in 370 patients. A significant correlation was identified between age and rotator cuff derangement (p < .001) and between age and AC joint derangement (p < .001). No significant difference was identified between gender and patterns of cuff derangement CONCLUSION: The extent of rotator cuff and AC joint derangement increases with ageing. Impingement appears to trigger a cascade of events in sequence, from isolated subacromial bursitis through to supraspinatus tendon tearing. Patterns of rotator cuff derangement are similar in men and women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11845-022-03012-yDOI Listing
May 2022

Osteochondral Lesions of the Tibial Plafond and Ankle Instability With Ankle Cartilage Lesions: Proceedings of the International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle.

Foot Ankle Int 2022 03 5;43(3):448-452. Epub 2022 Jan 5.

Background: An international consensus group of experts was convened to collaboratively advance toward consensus opinions based on the best available evidence on key topics within cartilage repair of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to present the consensus statements on osteochondral lesions of the tibial plafond (OLTP) and on ankle instability with ankle cartilage lesions developed at the 2019 International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle.

Methods: Forty-three experts in cartilage repair of the ankle were convened and participated in a process based on the Delphi method of achieving consensus. Questions and statements were drafted within 4 working groups focusing on specific topics within cartilage repair of the ankle, after which a comprehensive literature review was performed and the available evidence for each statement was graded. Discussion and debate occurred in cases where statements were not agreed on in unanimous fashion within the working groups. A final vote was then held.

Results: A total of 11 statements on OLTP reached consensus. Four achieved unanimous support and 7 reached strong consensus (greater than 75% agreement). A total of 8 statements on ankle instability with ankle cartilage lesions reached consensus during the 2019 International Consensus Meeting on Cartilage Repair of the Ankle. One achieved unanimous support, and seven reached strong consensus (greater than 75% agreement).

Conclusion: These consensus statements may assist clinicians in the management of these difficult clinical pathologies.

Level Of Evidence: Level V, mechanism-based reasoning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10711007211049169DOI Listing
March 2022

Metformin and Glaucoma-Review of Anti-Fibrotic Processes and Bioenergetics.

Cells 2021 08 19;10(8). Epub 2021 Aug 19.

Department of Ophthalmology, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Eccles Street, D07 R2WY Dublin, Ireland.

Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness globally. With an aging population, disease incidence will rise with an enormous societal and economic burden. The treatment strategy revolves around targeting intraocular pressure, the principle modifiable risk factor, to slow progression of disease. However, there is a clear unmet clinical need to find a novel therapeutic approach that targets and halts the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration that occurs with fibrosis. RGCs are highly sensitive to metabolic fluctuations as a result of multiple stressors and thus their viability depends on healthy mitochondrial functioning. Metformin, known for its use in type 2 diabetes, has come to the forefront of medical research in multiple organ systems. Its use was recently associated with a 25% reduced risk of glaucoma in a large population study. Here, we discuss its application to glaucoma therapy, highlighting its effect on fibrotic signalling pathways, mitochondrial bioenergetics and NAD oxidation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells10082131DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8394782PMC
August 2021

Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in Rugby Players Undergoing Shoulder Stabilization for Glenohumeral Instability: Professionals Have Higher Frequencies of More Pathologies.

Arthrosc Sports Med Rehabil 2021 Apr 23;3(2):e543-e547. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland.

Purpose: To quantify the magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) findings in rugby players during preoperative workup for anterior surgical stabilization for glenohumeral instability.

Methods: All patients who underwent glenohumeral instability surgery in our institution between 2008 and 2018 were considered for inclusion. Rugby players were identified using the patient's medical notes, with subsequent identification of all professional players. All rugby player's preoperative MRA findings were recorded and analyzed.

Results: Overall, 267 rugby players were included, 261 of whom were male (97.8%), with a mean age of 22.7 years (range 13-55 years). There were 58 professional rugby players (21.7%). The mean number of pathologies in nonprofessional rugby players was 5.0 pathologies versus 6.2 pathologies in the professional rugby players, with a significant difference in nonprofessional rugby players with up to 3 pathologies versus professional rugby players (26.3% vs 10.3%,  = .01). Professional rugby players had a statistically significant increased incidence of bicipital tendon lesions (25.9% vs 13.9%,  = .009), acromioclavicular joint degeneration (60.3% vs 42.1%,  = .016), glenohumeral bone loss (87.9% vs 69.9%,  = .006), and degenerative changes (67.2% vs 44.0%,  = .002) on their MRAs.

Conclusions: Rugby players undergoing surgical stabilization for glenohumeral instability often have a significant number of pathologies identified on MRA at the time of surgery. Professional rugby players showed concerningly greater frequencies of early degenerative changes when compared with nonprofessional rugby players.

Level Of Evidence: III; Retrospective Cohort Study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asmr.2020.12.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8129450PMC
April 2021

Long-term outcomes of the arthroscopic Bankart repair: a systematic review of studies at 10-year follow-up.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2019 Nov 13;28(11):2084-2089. Epub 2019 Jul 13.

Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland.

Background: The purpose of this study was to systematically review the evidence in the literature to ascertain the functional outcomes and recurrences rates, as well as subsequent revision rates, following arthroscopic Bankart repair at a minimum of 10 years' follow-up.

Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a literature search based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, using the Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library databases. Studies were included if they were clinical studies on arthroscopic Bankart repair with a minimum of 10 years' follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software.

Results: Our review found 9 studies including 822 shoulders meeting our inclusion criteria. The majority of patients were male patients (75.5%), the average age was 28.0 years (range, 15-73 years), and the mean follow-up period was 149.4 months. The most commonly used functional outcome score was the Rowe score, with a weighted mean of 87.0. Overall, 77.6% of athletes were able to return to sports postoperatively. The overall rate of recurrent instability was 31.2%, with 16.0% of patients having recurrent dislocations, and the overall revision rate was 17.0%. Evidence of instability arthropathy was found in 59.4% of patients, with 10.5% of patients having moderate to severe arthropathy.

Discussion And Conclusion: Arthroscopic Bankart repair for anterior shoulder instability has been shown to result in excellent long-term functional outcomes despite a relatively high rate of recurrent instability necessitating revision surgery. In addition, the high rate of instability arthropathy is a concern following arthroscopic Bankart repair in the long term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2019.04.057DOI Listing
November 2019

Open Compared with Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis: A Systematic Review.

JBJS Rev 2019 05;7(5):e4

Sports Surgery Clinic, Dublin, Ireland.

Background: Biceps tenodesis can be performed via an open or arthroscopic approach, and there is currently no consensus over which method is superior. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the cohort studies available in the literature to ascertain if open or arthroscopic techniques for biceps tenodesis result in superior clinical outcomes.

Methods: A systematic search of articles in MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Cohort studies comparing the open and arthroscopic techniques for biceps tenodesis were included.

Results: Seven clinical trials were identified with 598 patients. The mean follow-up was 23.6 months. In all of the included studies, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in any of the functional outcome scoring systems used, including, most commonly, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score and the Constant score. Similarly, no study found a significant difference (p > 0.05) in either patient satisfaction or return to sport. However, 2 studies found a slightly higher rate of complications with the arthroscopic technique due to an increased rate of fixation failure in 1 study and stiffness in the other study.

Conclusions: This study found that both open tenodesis and arthroscopic tenodesis result in excellent clinical outcomes, with no significant differences between either method.

Level Of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.RVW.18.00086DOI Listing
May 2019
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