Publications by authors named "Daiki Kasai"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Caring for carers: Understanding the physical and psychological well-being of carers of veterans in Australia.

Health Soc Care Community 2021 May 28. Epub 2021 May 28.

Allied Health and Human Performance, Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition, and Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Carers of veterans tend to put their own physical and psychological well-being needs behind the needs of the person they are caring for and often do not seek assistance for their own physical and psychological well-being. Combined, these factors lead to increased risk of acute and chronic illness and mental health issues. It is acknowledged that physical activity independently contributes to improved physical and mental health and may be a driver for mental well-being in carers. The aim of this pilot research was to understand how movement behaviour and health behaviours of carers of veterans in Australia relate to carers' physical and psychological well-being. Assessment occurred between February and July 2019 and included objective, validated measures to examine physical and psychological well-being. To assess the association between physical and psychological factors, correlational analyses were performed. Twenty-eight carers participated in the pilot study (96% female, mean age 61.6 years). Exercise capacity varied, and 84% of carers met the recommended 150 min of physical activity per week, with carers spending 8.6% of their time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity; and 37.9% of the day sedentary. Psychological health outcomes reflect a population with high distress levels and lower than average mental well-being, but with normal resilience scores. Carers with higher levels of resilience had greater exercise capacity, covering further distance in the 6-min walk test, and as resilience increased, number of sedentary bouts decreased. This research demonstrates that there is a relationship between health behaviours and psychological well-being in carers of veterans and serving personnel. Based on the findings of this pilot study, programmes to support family carers should include information about physical activity, reducing sedentary time, and increasing resilience. Interventions designed to improve physical and psychological well-being should be trialled and evaluated for effectiveness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13449DOI Listing
May 2021

Physical Activity Intensity Cut-Points for Wrist-Worn GENEActiv in Older Adults.

Front Sports Act Living 2020 15;2:579278. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

This study aims to (1) establish GENEActiv intensity cutpoints in older adults and (2) compare the classification accuracy between dominant (D) or non-dominant (ND) wrist, using both laboratory and free-living data. Thirty-one older adults participated in the study. They wore a GENEActiv Original on each wrist and performed nine activities of daily living. A portable gas analyzer was used to measure energy expenditure for each task. Testing was performed on two occasions separated by at least 8 days. Some of the same participants ( = 13) also wore one device on each wrist during 3 days of free-living. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to establish the optimal cutpoints. For sedentary time, both dominant and non-dominant wrist had excellent classification accuracy (sensitivity 0.99 and 0.97, respectively; specificity 0.91 and 0.86, respectively). For Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA), the non-dominant wrist device had better accuracy (ND sensitivity: 0.90, specificity 0.79; D sensitivity: 0.90, specificity 0.64). The corresponding cutpoints for sedentary-to-light were 255 and 375 g · min (epoch independent: 42.5 and 62.5 mg), and those for the light-to-moderate were 588 and 555 g · min (epoch-independent: 98.0 and 92.5 mg) for the non-dominant and dominant wrist, respectively. For free-living data, the dominant wrist device resulted in significantly more sedentary time and significantly less light and MVPA time compared to the non-dominant wrist.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fspor.2020.579278DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7843957PMC
January 2021

The Use of Ratings of Perceived Exertion in Children and Adolescents: A Scoping Review.

Sports Med 2021 Jan;51(1):33-50

UniSA Allied Health and Human Performance, Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

In adults, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) can be used to predict maximal oxygen uptake, estimate time to exhaustion, assess internal training load and regulate exercise intensity. However, the utility of RPE in children is less researched and therefore, warrants investigation. The purpose of this scoping review is to map out the literature around the application of RPE specifically during aerobic exercise in paediatric populations. Seven bibliographic databases were systematically searched. Grey literature searching and pearling of references were also conducted. To be included for the review, studies were required to comply with the following: (1) participants aged ≤ 18 years asymptomatic of any injuries, disabilities or illnesses; (2) applied RPE in aerobic exercise, testing and/or training; (3) included at least one measure of exercise intensity; and (4) be available in English. The search identified 22 eligible studies that examined the application of RPE in children. These studies involved a total of 718 participants across ten different countries. Nine different types of RPE scales were employed. Overall, the application of RPE in paediatric populations can be classified into three distinct themes: prediction of cardiorespiratory fitness/performance, monitoring internal training loads, and regulation of exercise intensity. The utility of RPE in paediatric populations remains unclear due to the small body of available research and inconsistencies between studies. However, findings from the included studies in this scoping review may show promise. Further research focussing on child-specific RPE scales across various sports, subgroups, and in field-based settings is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-020-01374-wDOI Listing
January 2021
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