Publications by authors named "Daichi Miyazaki"

4 Publications

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The evolutionary conserved iron-sulfur protein TCR controls P700 oxidation in photosystem I.

iScience 2021 Feb 13;24(2):102059. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Department of Life Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8501, Japan.

In natural habitats, plants have developed sophisticated regulatory mechanisms to optimize the photosynthetic electron transfer rate at the maximum efficiency and cope with the changing environments. Maintaining proper P700 oxidation at photosystem I (PSI) is the common denominator for most regulatory processes of photosynthetic electron transfers. However, the molecular complexes and cofactors involved in these processes and their function(s) have not been fully clarified. Here, we identified a redox-active chloroplast protein, the triplet-cysteine repeat protein (TCR). TCR shared similar expression profiles with known photosynthetic regulators and contained two triplet-cysteine motifs (CxxxCxxxC). Biochemical analysis indicated that TCR localizes in chloroplasts and has a [3Fe-4S] cluster. Loss of TCR limited the electron sink downstream of PSI during dark-to-light transition. double mutant reduced growth significantly and showed unusual oxidation and reduction of plastoquinone pool. These results indicated that TCR is involved in electron flow(s) downstream of PSI, contributing to P700 oxidation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2021.102059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7848650PMC
February 2021

Klebsormidium flaccidum genome reveals primary factors for plant terrestrial adaptation.

Nat Commun 2014 May 28;5:3978. Epub 2014 May 28.

Department of Biological Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama City, Kanagawa 226-8501, Japan.

The colonization of land by plants was a key event in the evolution of life. Here we report the draft genome sequence of the filamentous terrestrial alga Klebsormidium flaccidum (Division Charophyta, Order Klebsormidiales) to elucidate the early transition step from aquatic algae to land plants. Comparison of the genome sequence with that of other algae and land plants demonstrate that K. flaccidum acquired many genes specific to land plants. We demonstrate that K. flaccidum indeed produces several plant hormones and homologues of some of the signalling intermediates required for hormone actions in higher plants. The K. flaccidum genome also encodes a primitive system to protect against the harmful effects of high-intensity light. The presence of these plant-related systems in K. flaccidum suggests that, during evolution, this alga acquired the fundamental machinery required for adaptation to terrestrial environments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms4978DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4052687PMC
May 2014

Enantioselective borodeuteride reduction of aldimines catalyzed by cobalt complexes: preparation of optically active deuterated primary amines.

Org Lett 2003 Oct;5(20):3555-8

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522, Japan.

[reaction: see text] The enantioselective borodeuteride reduction catalyzed by optically active beta-ketoiminato cobalt complexes was applied to N-(di(o-tolyl)phosphinyl)aldimines to afford the corresponding optically active deuterated primary amines in high yields with high enantiomeric excesses after simple deprotection. The present deuteride reduction of aldimines is in the opposite sense of the enantioselective for the previously reported borohydride reduction of ketones or diphenylphosphinyl aldimines. The stereochemical course in these enantioselective reductions is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ol0349920DOI Listing
October 2003

Enantioselective borohydride reduction catalyzed by optically active cobalt complexes.

Chemistry 2003 Sep;9(18):4485-509

Basic Research Laboratories for Organic Synthesis, Mitsui Petrochemical Industries Ltd., Nagaura, Sodegaura-shi, Chiba 299-0265, Japan.

The highly enantioselective borohydride reduction of aromatic ketones or imines to the corresponding alcohols was developed in the presence of a catalytic amount of an optically active cobalt(II) complex catalyst. This enantioselective reduction is carried out using a precisely premodified borohydride with alcohols such as tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol, ethanol and methanol. High optical yields are obtained by choosing the appropriate alcohol as modifiers and a suitable beta-ketoiminato ligand of the catalyst. The enantioselective borohydride reduction has been successfully applied to the preparation of optically active 1,3-diols, the stereoselective reduction of diacylferrocenes, and dynamic and/or kinetic resolution of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chem.200304794DOI Listing
September 2003
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