Publications by authors named "Dagmara Wojkowska"

5 Publications

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Time-dependent interactions of blood platelets and cancer cells, accompanied by extramedullary hematopoiesis, lead to increased platelet activation and reactivity in a mouse orthotopic model of breast cancer - implications for pulmonary and liver metastasis.

Aging (Albany NY) 2020 03 19;12(6):5091-5120. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of Haemostatic Disorders, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

Aging has become a significant risk factor for several diseases, including breast cancer.Platelet activation and platelet-cancer cell aggregate fractions were found to increase with tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer. At advanced stages of tumor development, platelets from mice with breast cancer were hyperreactive to low agonist concentrations and hyporeactive to high ones. Platelet activation and reactivity were strongly associated with breast cancer metastasis in the lungs and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver. A greater fraction of platelet aggregates was observed in 4T1-injected mice at the advanced stages of breast cancer. , platelet activation was elevated after incubation with 4T1 cells, and thrombin-stimulated platelets formed aggregates with 4T1 cells. Neither GPIbα, nor GPIIb/IIIa blocking antibodies, were able to affect platelet-cancer cell aggregation .The primed circulating platelets became more sensitive to subthreshold stimuli at advanced stages of tumor development, and the formation of platelet-cancer cell aggregates increased with cancer progression. Our findings demonstrate that the age-associated progression of breast cancer cells is connected with increased platelet functioning, and that it can be manifested by the increased number of metastases and extramedullary hematopoiesis in a time-dependent-manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/aging.102933DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7138580PMC
March 2020

Functional inhibition of F11 receptor (F11R/junctional adhesion molecule-A/JAM-A) activity by a F11R-derived peptide in breast cancer and its microenvironment.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2020 Jan 24;179(2):325-335. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Department of Cytobiology and Proteomics, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

Purpose: To examine the involvement of the F11R/JAM-A protein in breast cancer metastasis, we utilized the F11R/JAM-A antagonistic peptide 4D (P4D) in experiments of transendothelial migration (TEM) of breast cancer cells.

Methods: Experiments were conducted in the mouse 4T1 breast cancer model utilizing the human mammary epithelial cell and endothelial cell lines. The levels of soluble F11R/JAM-A (sJAM-A) in the murine plasmas were measured by ELISA. Levels of F11R/JAM-A mRNA and protein in cell lines were assessed by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Cell surface expression of F11R/JAM-A was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Functional tests included the TEM of breast cancer cells and adhesion of breast cancer cells to the endothelium. The endothelial permeability was studied by fluorescent tracer assay and by the Real-Time Cell Analysis (RTCA).

Results: The tumor inducers Tβ4 and TGF-β1 reduced the levels of sJAM-A in murine plasma, and reduced the F11R/JAM-A protein levels in the human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1. The adhesion and TEM measured between breast cancer cells and inflamed or Tβ4-treated endothelium were inhibited by P4D. The presence of P4D did not destabilize the pre-existing tight junctions in the endothelial monolayer. The barrier-protecting effect of P4D was stronger than that of forskolin, when a booster dose of P4D was applied to the inflamed endothelium.

Conclusions: F11R/JAM-A protein can be considered as a novel target in the treatment of breast cancer metastasis. In vivo and clinical studies are needed to further investigate the effectiveness of F11R/JAM-A-derived peptide as a possible anti-metastatic drug.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-019-05471-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6987052PMC
January 2020

Interleukin 17A Promotes Lymphocytes Adhesion and Induces CCL2 and CXCL1 Release from Brain Endothelial Cells.

Int J Mol Sci 2017 May 8;18(5). Epub 2017 May 8.

Department of Neurology and Stroke, Medical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 113, 90-549 Lodz, Poland.

The nature of the interaction between Th17 cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for the development of autoimmune inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or interleukin 17 (IL-17) stimulation is known to enhance the adherence of Th17 cells to the brain endothelium. The brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3) express Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), the receptor responsible for inflammatory cell adhesion, which binds very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) on migrating effector lymphocytes at the early stage of brain inflammation. The present study examines the effect of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-17 on the adherence of Th17 cells to bEnd.3. The bEnd.3 cells were found to increase production of CCL2 and CXCL1 after stimulation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, while CCL2, CCL5, CCL20 and IL17 induced Th17 cell migration through a bEnd.3 monolayer. This observation may suggest potential therapeutic targets for the prevention of autoimmune neuroinflammation development in the CNS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms18051000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5454913PMC
May 2017

The impact of multiple sclerosis relapse treatment on migration of effector T cells--Preliminary study.

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2016 20;50(3):155-62. Epub 2016 Feb 20.

Department of Propedeutics of Neurology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; Department of Neurology and Stroke, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.

Unlabelled: Migration of inflammatory cells from the blood to the central nervous system (CNS) is crucial for development of multiple sclerosis (MS). Inhibition of this process would allow to control disease activity. The first step confirming this approach would be the analysis of the impact of effective MS relapse therapy on migration of effector T cells. The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of methylprednisolone (MP) on the migratory activity of effector CD4+ T cells from MS patients. Moreover, to study the potential mechanism of this process we studied expression of chemokine receptors on migrating cells.

Material And Methods: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients during relapse (n=23) and from control group (n=23). After isolation CD4+ T cells were incubated with various concentrations of MP. Then they were stimulated in chemotaxis assay with chemokines CCL3 or CXCL10 or were used to CCR1 and CXCR3 expression analysis.

Results: CXCL10- and CCL3-stimulated migration of CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in MS. MP was able to reduce in vitro migration of effector T cells induced by CXCL10, but not by CCL3. Inhibition by MP was dose-dependent. Expression of analyzed chemokine receptors was unaltered after MP incubation.

Conclusions: MP reduced CD4+ T cells migration induced by CXCL10 without affecting CXCR3 expression. These observations demonstrate one of the potential mechanisms of MP action in MS, distinct from inducing cell apoptosis, and suggests the new targets for development of more effective MS treatments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pjnns.2016.02.003DOI Listing
July 2016

Interactions between neutrophils, Th17 cells, and chemokines during the initiation of experimental model of multiple sclerosis.

Mediators Inflamm 2014 19;2014:590409. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Department of Neurology, Epileptology and Stroke, Medical University of Lodz, Ulice Zeromskiego 113, 90 549 Lodz, Poland ; Department of Propedeutics of Neurology, Medical University of Lodz, Ulice Zeromskiego 113, 90 549 Lodz, Poland.

Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS) in which activated T cell and neutrophil interactions lead to neuroinflammation. In this study the expression of CCR6, CXCR2, and CXCR6 in Th17 cells and neutrophils migrating to the brain during EAE was measured, alongside an evaluation of the production of IL-17, IL-23, CCL-20, and CXCL16 in the brain. Next, inflammatory cell subpopulations accumulating in the brain after intracerebral injections of IL-17 or CXCL1, as well as during modulation of EAE with anti-IL-23R or anti-CXCR2 antibodies, were analyzed. Th17 cells upregulate CXCR2 during the preclinical phase of EAE and a significant migration of these cells to the brain was observed. Neutrophils upregulated CCR6, CXCR2, and CXCR6 during EAE, accumulating in the brain both prior to and during acute EAE attacks. Production of IL-17, IL-23, CCL20, and CXCL16 in the CNS was increased during both preclinical and acute EAE. Intracerebral delivery of CXCL1 stimulated the early accumulation of neutrophils in normal and preclinical EAE brains but reduced the migration of Th17 cells to the brain during the preclinical stage of EAE. Modulation of EAE by anti-IL-23R antibodies ameliorated EAE by decreasing the intracerebral accumulation of Th17 cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/590409DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3945772PMC
December 2014