Publications by authors named "D Van Zele"

16 Publications

The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in ticks and animals in Slovenia.

BMC Vet Res 2019 Oct 25;15(1):368. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

Veterinary Faculty, Institute for Pathology, Wild Animals, Fishes and Bees, University of Ljubljana, Gerbiceva 60, 1000, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Background: The obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii causes globally distributed zoonotic Q fever. Ruminant livestock are common reservoirs of C. burnetii. Coxiella burnetii are shed in large numbers in the waste of infected animals and are transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of C. burnetii infection in domestic animals and ticks in areas of Slovenia associated with a history of Q fever outbreaks.

Results: A total of 701 ticks were collected and identified from vegetation, domestic animals and wild animals. C. burnetii DNA was detected in 17 out of 701 (2.4%) ticks. No C. burnetii DNA was found in male ticks. Ticks that tested positive in the PCR-based assay were most commonly sampled from wild deer (5.09%), followed by ticks collected from domestic animals (1.16%) and ticks collected by flagging vegetation (0.79%). Additionally, 150 animal blood samples were investigated for the presence of C. burnetii-specific antibodies and pathogen DNA. The presence of pathogen DNA was confirmed in 14 out of 150 (9.3%) blood samples, while specific antibodies were detected in sera from 60 out of 150 (40.4%) animals.

Conclusions: Our results indicate that ticks, although not the primary source of the bacteria, are infected with C. burnetii and may represent a potential source of infection for humans and animals. Ticks collected from animals were most likely found to harbor C. burnetii DNA, and the infection was not lost during molting. The persistence and distribution of pathogens in cattle and sheep indicates that C. burnetii is constantly present in Slovenia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-019-2130-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6815026PMC
October 2019

Hypertrophic Osteopathy Associated with Mycotic Pneumonia in a Roe Deer ( Capreolus capreolus).

J Wildl Dis 2018 07 2;54(3):631-634. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

1 Institute of Pathology, Wild Animals, Fish and Bees, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Gerbičeva 60, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most common Aspergillus species causing disease in individual animals but it rarely affects deer species. We report a case of A. fumigatus infection causing mycotic pneumonia and hypertrophic osteopathy in a roe deer ( Capreolus capreolus).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/2017-07-171DOI Listing
July 2018

Prevalence of Anti-Hepatitis E Virus Antibodies and First Detection of Hepatitis E Virus in Wild Boar in Slovenia.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2016 Jan 12;16(1):71-4. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

2 Central Veterinary Institute of Wageningen University and Research Centre , Lelystad, the Netherlands .

Hepatitis E is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV). In this study, we investigated HEV presence in a wild boar (Sus scrofa) population of Slovenia. A total of 288 wild boar serum samples were collected throughout the country, and HEV infection was investigated by serology, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by HEV RNA detection using a real-time PCR assay. Antibodies against HEV were detected in 30.2% (87/288) of animals tested, whereas HEV RNA was detected in only one sample. This is the first evidence of HEV presence in the wild boar population in Slovenia, and these results suggest that these animals are part of the HEV epidemiological cycle in the country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2015.1819DOI Listing
January 2016

Mycobacterium spp. in wild game in Slovenia.

Vet J 2016 Feb 13;208:93-5. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Gerbičeva 60, SI-1115 Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Wildlife species are an important reservoir of mycobacterial infections that may jeopardise efforts to control and eradicate bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis. Slovenia is officially free of bTB, but no data on the presence of mycobacteria in wild animals has been reported. In this study, samples of liver and lymph nodes were examined from 306 apparently healthy free-range wild animals of 13 species in Slovenia belonging to the families Cervidae, Suidae, Canidae, Mustelidae and Bovidae. Mycobacteria were isolated from 36/306 (11.8%) animals (red deer, roe deer, fallow deer, wild boar and jackal) and identified by PCR, commercial diagnostic kits and sequencing. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria identified in five species were Mycobacterium peregrinum, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, M. intracellulare, M. confluentis, M. fortuitum, M. terrae, M. avium subsp. avium, M. celatum, M. engbaekii, M. neoaurum, M. nonchromogenicum and M. vaccae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2015.10.004DOI Listing
February 2016

Intestinal parasites of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Slovenia.

Acta Vet Hung 2013 Dec;61(4):454-62

University of Ljubljana Institute of Microbiology and Parasitology, Veterinary Faculty Gerbičeva 60 1115 Ljubljana Slovenia.

In the present study, 428 foxes were collected and examined for intestinal helminths using the washing-out method. Parasites were found in 93.2% of the examined animals. The most frequently identified nematodes were Uncinaria stenocephala (58.9%), Toxocara canis (38.3%) and Molineus patens (30.6%). Other nematodes found were Pterygodermatites affinis (4.2%), Capillaria sp. (2.8%), Crenosoma vulpis (2.8%), Toxascaris leonina (2.5%), Trichuris vulpis (0.7%) and Physaloptera sp. (0.2%). Mesocestoides sp. (27.6%) and Taenia crassiceps (22.2%) were the most prevalent cestodes, followed by T. polyacantha (6.5%), Hymenolepis nana (2.1%), T. pisiformis (2.1%) and Dipylidium caninum (1.4%). The study also revealed four trematode species: Rossicotrema donicum (1.6%), Heterophyes heterophyes (1.1%), Metagonimus yokogawai (1.1%), Prohemistomum appendiculatum (0.4%) and two protozoan species: oocysts of Sarcocystis (2.8%) and Isospora (0.4%). This is the first extensive study on the intestinal parasites of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Slovenia. The 2.6% prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in the same sample population as investigated herein has been reported previously (Vergles Rataj et al., 2010).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1556/AVet.2013.029DOI Listing
December 2013
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