Publications by authors named "D Málková"

117 Publications

Correction to: The role of appetite-related hormones, adaptive thermogenesis, perceived hunger and stress in long-term weight-loss maintenance: a mixed-methods study.

Eur J Clin Nutr 2021 Jun;75(6):997-998

Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41430-021-00881-xDOI Listing
June 2021

Weight loss-induced increase in fasting ghrelin concentration is a predictor of weight regain: Evidence from the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT).

Diabetes Obes Metab 2020 Dec 2. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.

Aim: To investigate whether appetite-related hormones were predictors of weight regain in the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT).

Materials And Methods: DiRECT is a cluster-randomized clinical trial, designed to assess the effect of weight loss on type 2 diabetes remission. For this post hoc analysis, data were available for 253 (147 interventions, 106 controls) individuals with type 2 diabetes (age 53.6 ± 7.5 years, body mass index 34.7 ± 4.4 kg/m , 59% men). Intervention participants received a 24-month weight management programme, and controls remained on usual diabetes care. Fasting plasma concentrations of leptin, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY were measured at baseline, 12 months and 24 months in all participants, and at 5 months in a subset of participants in the intervention (n = 56) and control groups (n = 22). Potential predictors were examined using multivariable linear regression models.

Results: The intervention group lost 14.3 ± 6.0% body weight at 5 months but regained weight over time, with weight losses of 10.0 ± 7.5% at 12 months and 7.6 ± 6.3% at 24 months. Weight loss in controls was 1.1 ± 3.7% and 2.1 ± 5.0% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Body weight increased by 2.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4, 4.1; P = 0.019) between 12 and 24 months for every 1-ng/mL increase in ghrelin between baseline and 12 months, and weight regain between 12 and 24 months was increased by 1.1% (95% CI 0.2, 2.0; P = 0.023) body weight for every 1-ng/mL increase in ghrelin at 12 months.

Conclusion: The rise in ghrelin (but not any other measured hormone) during diet-induced weight loss was a predictor of weight regain during follow-up, and concentrations remained elevated over time, suggesting a small but significant compensatory drive to regain weight. Attenuating the effects of ghrelin may improve weight-loss maintenance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dom.14274DOI Listing
December 2020

Weight loss induced increase in fasting ghrelin concentration is a predictor of weight regain: evidence from the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial.

Diabetes Obes Metab 2020 Dec 2. Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.

Aim: To investigate whether appetite-related hormones were predictors of weight regain in the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT).

Materials And Methods: DiRECT is a cluster-randomised clinical trial designed to assess the effect of weight-loss on type 2 diabetes remission. For this post hoc analysis, data were available for 253 (147 interventions, 106 controls) individuals with type 2 diabetes (aged 53.6±7.5 years, BMI 34.7±4.4 kg/m, 59% males). Intervention participants received a 24-month weight-management programme and controls remained on usual diabetes care. Fasting plasma concentrations of leptin, ghrelin, GLP-1, and PYY were measured at baseline, 12 and 24-months in all participants, and at 5-months in a subset of interventions (n=56) and controls (n=22). Potential predictors were examined using multivariable linear regression models.

Results: The intervention group lost 14.3±6.0% body-weight at 5-months but regained over time, with weight-losses of 10.0±7.5% at 12-months and 7.6±6.3% at 24-months. Weight-loss in controls was 1.1±3.7% and 2.1±5.0% at 12 and 24-months, respectively. Body-weight increased by 2.3% [95% CI: 0.4,4.1]; p=0.019) between 12 and 24-months for every 1 ng/ml increase in ghrelin between baseline and 12-months, and weight regain between 12 and 24-months was increased by 1.1% (95% CI: 0.2,2.0; p=0.023) body-weight for every 1 ng/ml increase in ghrelin at 12-months.

Conclusion: The rise in ghrelin (but not any other measured hormone) during diet-induced weight-loss was a predictor of weight regain during follow-up, and concentrations remained elevated over time, suggesting a small but significant compensatory drive to regain weight. Attenuating the effects of ghrelin may improve WLM. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dom.14274DOI Listing
December 2020

'I have been all in, I have been all out and I have been everything in-between': A 2-year longitudinal qualitative study of weight loss maintenance.

J Hum Nutr Diet 2021 Feb 21;34(1):199-214. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Background: Qualitative studies investigating weight management experiences are usually cross-sectional or of short duration, which limits understanding of the long-term challenges.

Methods: Eleven women [mean (SD) age 44.9 (9.8) years; body mass index 40.3 (4.0) kg m ] participated in this longitudinal qualitative study, which included up to 20 weeks of total diet replacement (825-853 kcal day ) and ongoing support for weight loss maintenance (WLM), to 2 years. Semi-structured interviews were conducted at baseline and programme end, as well as at key intervals during the intervention. Questions examined five theoretical themes: motivation, self-regulation, habits, psychological resources and social/environmental influences. Data were coded and analysed in nvivo (https://qsrinternational.com/nvivo) using the framework method.

Results: In total, 64 interviews were completed (median, n = 6 per participant). Mean (SD) weight loss was 15.7 (9.6) kg (14.6% body weight) at 6 months and 9.6 (9.9) kg (8.8% body weight) at 2 years. The prespecified theoretical model offered a useful framework to capture the variability of experiences. Negative aspects of obesity were strong motivations for weight loss and maintenance. Perceiving new routines as sustainable and developing a 'maintenance mindset' was characteristic of 'Maintainers', whereas meeting emotional needs at the expense of WLM goals during periods of stress and negative mood states was reported more often by 'Regainers'. Optimistic beliefs about maintaining weight losses appeared to interfere with barrier identification and coping planning for most participants.

Conclusions: People tended to be very optimistic about WLM without acknowledging barriers and this may undermine longer-term outcomes. The potential for regain remained over time, mainly as a result of emotion-triggered eating to alleviate stress and negative feelings. More active self-regulation during these circumstances may improve WLM, and these situations represent important targets for intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12826DOI Listing
February 2021

Plasma pharmacokinetics of (poly)phenol metabolites and catabolites after ingestion of orange juice by endurance trained men.

Free Radic Biol Med 2020 11 11;160:784-795. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK; United Kingdom and Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

The health benefits of orange juice (OJ) consumption are attributed in part to the circulating flavanone phase II metabolites and their microbial-derived ring fission phenolic catabolites. The present study investigated these compounds in the bloodstream after acute intake of 500 mL of OJ. Plasma samples obtained at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 24 h after OJ intake were analysed by HPLC-HR-MS. Eleven flavanone metabolites and 36 phenolic catabolites were identified and quantified in plasma. The main metabolites were hesperetin-3'-sulfate with a peak plasma concentration (C) of 80 nmol/L, followed by hesperetin-7-glucuronide (C 24 nmol/L), hesperetin-3'-glucuronide (C 18 nmol/L) and naringenin-7-glucuronide (C 21 nmol/L). Among the main phenolic catabolites to increase in plasma after OJ consumption were 3'-methoxycinnamic acid-4'-sulfate (C 19 nmol/L), 3-hydroxy-3-(3'-hydroxy-4'-methoxyphenyl)propanoic acid (C 20 nmol/L), 3-(3'-hydroxy-4'-methoxyphenyl)propanoic acid (C 19 nmol/L), 3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid (C 25 nmol/L), and 3-(phenyl)propanoic acid (C 19 nmol/L), as well as substantial amounts of phenylacetic and hippuric acids. The comprehensive plasma pharmacokinetic profiles that were obtained are of value to the design of future ex vivo cell studies, aimed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying the potential health benefits of OJ consumption. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02627547.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2020.09.007DOI Listing
November 2020