Publications by authors named "D H Nichols"

1,244 Publications

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Characteristics and Treatment of Patients Diagnosed With Paradoxical Adipose Hyperplasia After Cryolipolysis: A Case Series and Scoping Review.

Aesthet Surg J 2022 Aug 12. Epub 2022 Aug 12.

Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

Background: Paradoxical adipose hyperplasia (PAH), a rare side effect of CoolSculpting (cryolipolysis), is characterized by fatty enlargement of the treatment area occurring months after the procedure.

Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a retrospective case series of patients diagnosed with PAH at our institution, increase the collective understanding of this complication and subsequent management, and raise the question of who should ethically perform cryolipolysis.

Methods: All participants diagnosed with PAH by a plastic surgeon at a large academic medical center were identified. Demographic information, medical history, procedure details, time to PAH diagnosis, and corrective surgical intervention details were collected. Mean duration of time from cryolipolysis treatment to diagnosis of PAH was calculated, along with other descriptive statistics. A scoping review of all PAH literature published in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science was also conducted.

Results: Four patients diagnosed with PAH after cryolipolysis were identified for inclusion in this study. The calculated incidence of PAH at our center was 0.67%. All patients requested therapy for PAH and subsequently underwent either liposuction, abdominoplasty, or both. The mean duration of in-person follow-up time after final surgical treatment of PAH was 13.8 ± 19.8 months (range: 2.8-43.5). Fortunately, no patients showed signs of PAH recurrence, and three out of four patients did not show signs of residual deformity.

Conclusions: Findings from this patient cohort and scoping review provide evidence that although revisions may be required, conventional body contouring methods, not in the armamentarium of non-plastic surgeon practitioners, effectively alleviated PAH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjac219DOI Listing
August 2022

Analysis of Citrus Bioflavonoid Content and Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitory Potential of Commercially Available Supplements.

Molecules 2022 Jul 25;27(15). Epub 2022 Jul 25.

School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7000, Australia.

Citrus bioflavonoids are polyphenolic plant-derived pigments found in high levels in oranges, lemons, grapefruits and other citrus fruits. The three most abundant types of citrus bioflavonoids are hesperidin, naringenin and eriocitrin. Citrus bioflavonoids have long been known to possess powerful free radical-scavenging properties and cardioprotective effects. The study involved the analysis of 10 commercially available citrus bioflavonoid supplements from three different countries: Australia, the United States and Canada. The supplements were tested for their citrus bioflavonoid content which varied from 0.8 to 33.3% /. The daily bioflavonoid dose varied from 19 mg to 560 mg. Hesperidin was the major citrus bioflavonoid in nine out of ten supplements. One supplement was found to contain less than 10% of the quantity of rutin claimed to have been added. The DPP-4 inhibitory potential, compared through an estimation of rutin equivalence, ranged from 1.9 mg to 400 mg per day. This data highlights the variability between the supplements in their potential to inhibit DPP-4 for subsequent health benefits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules27154741DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9332104PMC
July 2022

Multi-omics reveals mechanisms of resistance to potato root infection by Spongospora subterranea.

Sci Rep 2022 Jun 25;12(1):10804. Epub 2022 Jun 25.

Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, New Town Research Laboratories, University of Tasmania, 13 St Johns Avenue, New Town, TAS, 7008, Australia.

The pathogen Spongospora subterranea infects potato roots and developing tubers resulting in tuber yield and quality losses. Currently, there are no fully effective treatments for disease control. Host resistance is an important tool in disease management and understanding the molecular mechanisms of defence responses in roots of potato plants is required for the breeding of novel resistant cultivars. Here, we integrated transcriptomic and proteomic datasets to uncover these mechanisms underlying S. subterranea resistance in potato roots. This multi-omics approach identified upregulation of glutathione metabolism at the levels of RNA and protein in the resistant cultivar but not in the susceptible cultivar. Upregulation of the lignin metabolic process, which is an important component of plant defence, was also specific to the resistant cultivar at the transcriptome level. In addition, the inositol phosphate pathway was upregulated in the susceptible cultivar but downregulated in the resistant cultivar in response to S. subterranea infection. We provide large-scale multi-omics data of Spongospora-potato interaction and suggest an important role of glutathione metabolism in disease resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-14606-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9233701PMC
June 2022

Preface to the special issue "Psychedelics and Neurochemistry".

J Neurochem 2022 07 14;162(1):7-8. Epub 2022 Jun 14.

Department of Medical Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.

Psychedelics are a relatively recent field of research that had not gained much support half a century ago, yet it developed into a much acknowledged, highly relevant field that extends to many people's lives. Psychedelics have demonstrated profound and durable therapeutic potential for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety, and substance use disorders, among others. In this special issue, basic science of psychedelics is reviewed with respect to fundamental cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, all the way up to the human systems level with clinical reviews. We hope the articles, authored by leading scientists in their field, will help to understand better the role of the serotonin 5-HT receptor in particular in healthy and diseased brain function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jnc.15651DOI Listing
July 2022

Secretory Cells are the Primary Source of pIgR in Small Airways.

Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2022 Jun 10. Epub 2022 Jun 10.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 12328, Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States.

Loss of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) is common in COPD small airways and likely contributes to disease progression. We hypothesized loss of SIgA results from reduced expression of pIgR, a chaperone protein needed for SIgA transcytosis, in the COPD small airway epithelium. pIgR-expressing cells were defined and quantified at single-cell resolution in human airways using RNA in-situ hybridization, immunostaining, and single-cell RNA sequencing. Complementary studies in mice utilized immunostaining, primary murine tracheal epithelial cell (MTEC) culture, and transgenic mice with secretory or ciliated cell-specific knockout of pIgR. SIgA degradation by human neutrophil elastase or secreted bacterial proteases from non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) was evaluated in vitro. We found that secretory cells are the predominant cell type responsible for pIgR expression in human and murine airways. Loss of SIgA in small airways was not associated with a reduction in secretory cells but rather a reduction in pIgR protein expression despite intact PIGR mRNA expression. Neutrophil elastase and NTHi-secreted proteases are both capable of degrading SIgA in vitro and may also contribute to a deficient SIgA immunobarrier in COPD. Loss of the SIgA immunobarrier in small airways of patients with severe COPD is complex and likely results from both pIgR-dependent defects in IgA transcytosis and SIgA degradation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2021-0548OCDOI Listing
June 2022
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