Publications by authors named "D C Happold"

6 Publications

The status of the world's land and marine mammals: diversity, threat, and knowledge.

Science 2008 Oct;322(5899):225-30

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Programme, IUCN, 28 Rue Mauverney, 1196 Gland, Switzerland.

Knowledge of mammalian diversity is still surprisingly disparate, both regionally and taxonomically. Here, we present a comprehensive assessment of the conservation status and distribution of the world's mammals. Data, compiled by 1700+ experts, cover all 5487 species, including marine mammals. Global macroecological patterns are very different for land and marine species but suggest common mechanisms driving diversity and endemism across systems. Compared with land species, threat levels are higher among marine mammals, driven by different processes (accidental mortality and pollution, rather than habitat loss), and are spatially distinct (peaking in northern oceans, rather than in Southeast Asia). Marine mammals are also disproportionately poorly known. These data are made freely available to support further scientific developments and conservation action.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1165115DOI Listing
October 2008

Termites as food for the thick-tailed bushbaby (Otolemur crassicaudatus) in Malawi.

Folia Primatol (Basel) 1992 ;58(2):118-20

Division of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000156618DOI Listing
July 1992

Reproduction of Angola free-tailed bats (Tadarida condylura) and little free-tailed bats (Tadarida pumila) in Malawi (Central Africa) and elsewhere in Africa.

J Reprod Fertil 1989 Jan;85(1):133-49

Department of Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra.

Angola free-tailed bats and little free-tailed bats occur in diverse habitats throughout most of Africa south of the Sahara. This study investigated the reproductive strategies and related biology of these species in Malawi where they were sympatric, and analysed data from elsewhere in Africa to show how the strategies varied along a gradient of habitats from approximately 12 degrees N to 25 degrees S. Both the Angola free-tailed bat and the little free-tailed bat were normally monotocous. Angola free-tailed bats invariably had 2 births/year, and the interval between consecutive births decreased with increasing latitude. When the interval was shortest (approximately 90 days) a post-partum oestrus occurred. Little free-tailed bats differed by having a shorter gestation (approximately 60 days), and the ability to have up to 5 births/year with a postpartum oestrus after each birth. The extent to which this potential is achieved varies with latitude and rainfall, mainly so that lactation can coincide with peaks in the abundance of food. The interaction between rainfall and reproductive characteristics results in the two species having patterns of reproduction which are sometimes similar, but more often different. Competition between the species is unlikely to be affected by differences in their reproduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/jrf.0.0850133DOI Listing
January 1989

The red crowned mangabey, Cercocebus torquatus, in western Nigeria.

Authors:
D C Happold

Folia Primatol (Basel) 1973 ;20(5):423-8

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000155589DOI Listing
October 1974

Mosquito ecology in central Alberta. II. Adult populations and activities.

Authors:
D C Happold

Can J Zool 1965 Sep;43(5):821-46

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/z65-084DOI Listing
September 1965
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