Publications by authors named "D B Haseman"

8 Publications

Musculoskeletal case of the day. Osteosarcomatosis.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 1994 Jun;162(6):1467-9

Department of Radiology, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Penn State University, Hershey 17033.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/ajr.162.6.8192031DOI Listing
June 1994

The effect of informed consent on the level of anxiety in patients given i.v. contrast material.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 1994 Mar;162(3):531-5

Department of Radiology, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey 17033.

Objective: A common reason given for not obtaining informed consent before the use of IV contrast material is that the anxiety created by informing patients of potential reactions will increase the possibility of their occurring. However, the idea that this is possible is debatable, and no study of this subject has used a standardized anxiety index. Accordingly, using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, we assessed the anxiety level among patients about to have an IV contrast procedure and measured the effect of informing them of the risks associated with the use of contrast material.

Subjects And Methods: Approximately 2050 adult outpatients at three separate medical centers were solicited for participation in this study. Each of the 1251 patients who volunteered to participate was placed into one of six groups. The majority were patients who were awaiting the injection of either ionic or nonionic contrast material and who were or were not informed of the risks associated with the use of IV contrast material. The last two groups were generally healthy outpatients reporting for routine X-rays who were not awaiting IV contrast administration but who were informed of the risks associated with the use of ionic and nonionic contrast material. Each patient informed of the risks was asked to read a standardized consent form, and all patients completed a standardized anxiety index.

Results: Patients who were informed of the risks associated with IV contrast material did not have measurably increased anxiety, and they did not have an increased prevalence of adverse reactions. Indeed, the only patients who had statistically significant increased anxiety compared with the other groups were among those awaiting the injection of ionic contrast material who were not informed of the risks (p = .04). The majority (51-78%) of patients in all six groups had measurable elevated anxiety scores.

Conclusion: We conclude that it is not justified to fail to obtain informed consent in order to avoid anxiety-induced adverse reactions to IV contrast material. The majority of patients awaiting injection of IV contrast material have measurable increased anxiety levels regardless of whether they are informed of its risks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/ajr.162.3.8109491DOI Listing
March 1994

Osteosarcomatosis.

Radiology 1990 Apr;175(1):233-9

Department of Radiology, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey 17033.

A review of the 690 cases of osteosarcoma in the radiographic file of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology revealed 29 cases of "osteosarcomatosis" (multiple skeletal sites of osteosarcoma). Fifteen of these patients were 18 years old and under and manifested rapidly appearing, usually symmetric, sclerotic metaphyseal lesions. The remaining 14 patients were more than 18 years old and had fewer, asymmetric sclerotic lesions. In most patients (28 of 29), a radiographically dominant skeletal tumor was seen. Pulmonary metastases occurred in the majority of patients and were detected at the same time as the bone lesions. These 29 patients were studied with regard to demographic data and skeletal distribution and radiographic appearance of their lesions. As a result of the findings, a metastatic origin from a primary dominant osteosarcoma is favored over a multifocal origin as the basis for osteosarcomatosis. Osteosarcomatosis is more commonly encountered in the mature skeleton than has been previously recognized.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiology.175.1.2315487DOI Listing
April 1990

Case report 634. Osteosarcomatosis.

Skeletal Radiol 1990 ;19(7):535-7

Department of Radiology, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey 17033.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00202706DOI Listing
January 1991