Dr. Cynthia A. Rohrbeck, PhD - The George Washington University - Associate Professor

Dr. Cynthia A. Rohrbeck

PhD

The George Washington University

Associate Professor

Washington, DC, District of Columbia | United States

Main Specialties: Psychiatry, Public Health

Additional Specialties: Clinical / Community Psychology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-5680-5690


Top Author

Dr. Cynthia A. Rohrbeck, PhD - The George Washington University - Associate Professor

Dr. Cynthia A. Rohrbeck

PhD

Introduction

Cynthia Rohrbeck, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC. She received her BA in Psychology, Cornell University and her MA and PhD from The University of Rochester. Her research interests are in general stress and coping in children, adults and families. Current specific interests include relationships among past and ongoing exposure to human-made and natural disasters, mental health, and emergency preparedness.

Primary Affiliation: The George Washington University - Washington, DC, District of Columbia , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. Cynthia A. Rohrbeck’s Resume / CV

Education

Aug 1980 - May 1986
University of Rochester
PhD
Psychology
May 1983
University of Rochester
MA
Clinical Psychology
Aug 1976 - May 1980
Cornell University
BA
Psychology

Experience

Sep 1992
The George Washington University
Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
Sep 1992
Brown University
Visiting Associate Professor (Sabbatical Position)
Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Aug 1985 - Jan 1992
The George Washington University
Assistant Professor
Psychology

Publications

40Publications

221Reads

28Profile Views

Anxiety effects on disaster precautionary behaviors: A multi-path cognitive model.

J Health Psychol 2019 09 27;24(10):1401-1411. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

2 James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105317720277DOI Listing
September 2019
6 Reads

Disability and disasters: the role of self-efficacy in emergency preparedness.

Psychol Health Med 2019 01 14;24(1):83-93. Epub 2018 Jul 14.

a Department of Psychology , The George Washington University , DC , Washington , USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2018.1492730DOI Listing
January 2019
107 Reads
1.532 Impact Factor

Supportive communication between deployed parents and children is linked to children’s adjustment

Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology

View Article
August 2018

Impact Factor 1.826

48 Reads

The Importance of Self-Efficacy in Parental Emergency Preparedness: A Moderated Mediation Model.

Disaster Med Public Health Prep 2018 Jun 1;12(3):345-351. Epub 2017 Aug 1.

Department of Decision Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, DC.

Objective: Disasters occur without warning and can have devastating consequences. Emergency preparedness can reduce negative effects. It is especially important that parents prepare, as children are particularly vulnerable after disasters. This study tested 2 hypotheses: (1) adults with more children are likely to be better prepared than those with fewer or no children because greater caretaking is linked to greater perceived threat of disaster leading to greater preparedness and (2) the strength of this mediational link varies as a function of parental self-efficacy.
Methods: Data from an online survey about human-made disasters (terrorism) with a community convenience sample were used to test the hypothesis that perceived threat mediates the relationship between parental status (number of children cared for) and preparedness behaviors, moderated by level of self-efficacy for emergency preparedness.
Results: A bootstrapping analysis with relevant covariates supported the hypothesized mediating effect of threat on the relationship between parental status and preparedness. This relationship was strengthened at higher levels of parental preparedness self-efficacy.
Conclusions: The results of this study are particularly relevant for preparedness interventions. Because threat leads to preparedness, particularly for parents with high self-efficacy, it is important to focus attention on factors that can improve parents' sense of self-efficacy. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018; 12: 345-351).

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2017.80DOI Listing
June 2018
108 Reads
1.142 Impact Factor

The Dynamic Role of Perceived Threat and Self Efficacy in Motivating Terrorism Preparedness Behaviors.

International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction

Past research on perceived threat and self-efficacy, two central components in theories of household disaster preparedness, has revealed only weak relationships. One possible explanation is that threat and self-efficacy may play a more important role at early stages of preparedness motivation or readiness (i.e., in motivating the individual to contemplate taking action) than at later stages (i.e., in moving the individual from contemplation to action). In this study of 290 participants from a cross-sectional community survey, between-stage multinomial logistic regression revealed that perceived likelihood of a future terrorist attack, and (to a lesser extent) perceived self-efficacy to cope with a future terrorist attack, exert more influence on planning to take action than on actually taking action. Another form of threat, perceived severity, had little independent influence. These results comport with a central thesis of the Socio-Cognitive model, viz. that readiness stage moderates the impact of cognitive appraisals on preparedness. Elevated appraisals of likelihood and self-efficacy are necessary but not sufficient for individuals to adopt preparedness behaviors, exerting their greatest influence early in the decisionmaking process.

View Article
September 2017

Impact Factor 2.494

129 Reads

Peer relationships: Promoting positive peer relationships during childhood

Encyclopedia of Primary Prevention and Health Promotion

View Article
January 2014
57 Reads

Peer relationships: Promoting positive peer relationships during adolescence

Encyclopedia of Primary Prevention and Health Promotion

View Article
January 2014
59 Reads

A meta-analytic review of the social, self-concept and behavioral conduct outcomes of peer assisted learning

98, 732-749. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.98.4.732

Journal of Educational Psychology

Meta-analysis was used to examine social, self-concept, and behavioral effects of peer-assisted learning (PAL) interventions with elementary school students. An electronic search of PsycINFO and ERIC databases resulted in 36 relevant PAL studies. Overall, effect sizes were small to moderate across the 3 outcome variable domains. Both social and self-concept outcomes were positively correlated with academic outcomes. Specific PAL components—student autonomy, individualized evaluation, structured student roles, interdependent group rewards, and same-gender grouping—were related to effect sizes. PAL interventions were more effective for low-income versus higher income, urban versus suburban– rural, minority versus nonminority, and Grades 1–3 students versus Grades 4 – 6 students. Results suggest that PAL interventions that focus on academics can also improve social and self-concept outcomes.

View Article
January 2006
63 Reads

Peer Relationships, Childhood

Encyclopedia of primary prevention and health promotion / editors, Thomas P. Gullotta and Martin Bloom

http://proxygw.wrlc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=cat00411a&AN=mu.5674660&site=eds-live

View Article
January 2003
57 Reads

Peer Relationships, Adolescence

Encyclopedia of primary prevention and health promotion / editors, Thomas P. Gullotta and Martin Bloom

View Article
January 2003
62 Reads

The Child Rating Scale: The development of a socioemotional self-rating scale for elementary school children

16, 239-255

School Psychology Review

ABSTRACT: This article describes the development of the Child Rating Scale (CRS), a socioemotional self-rating scale for elementary school children. Four CRS Factors, i.e., Rule Compliance/Acting-Out, Anxiety/Withdrawal, Interpersonal Social Skills, and Self-confidence were found consistently across four independent samples totaling more than 2000 1st through 6th grade children. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability,demographic comparisons, and indices of concurrent and construct validity are presented. The scale’s uses and limitations are discussed.

View Article
January 1987
63 Reads

A component analysis of behavioral self-management interventions with elementary school students

9, 33-43. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/j019v09n01_03

Child and Family Behavior Therapy

Abstract This review provided a detailed component analysis of self-control treatment literature with elementary school children. The review was limited to the published school-bases, self-control treatment literature available from 1967 to 1984. A standardized rating procedure, the Self-Management Intervention Checklist (SMIC), was developed to rate self-management investigations according to: (a) subject and setting characteristics, (b) training and follow-up details, and (c) an analysis of the self-management intervention components. The results indicate a lack of adequate attention to: (a) subject variables, (b) training considerations, and (c) difference in self-management interventions. The limitations and qualifications of current self-management training and implications for developing a more effective self-management training technology are discussed

View Article
January 1987
55 Reads

A cognitive behavioral model of child abuse.

Violent individuals and families: A practitioner's handbook

View Article
January 1984
56 Reads