Publications by authors named "Cuiping Schiman"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Smoking cessation and weight gain: Evidence from China.

Econ Hum Biol 2021 Jul 16;43:101045. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Department of Economics, Georgia Southern University, United States. Electronic address:

Cigarette smoking has long been viewed as a means to control body weight. However, studies on the association between smoking cessation and weight gain have reported mixed findings and, notably, there is limited evidence among the Chinese population - the world's largest smoker population. The extent to which smoking cessation is positively associated with body weight is of interest as excessive weight gain contributes to heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, musculoskeletal disorders, and some cancers. Additionally, concerns over weight gain may dissuade current smokers from quitting. Using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), we examine the association between smoking cessation and body weight in China. To account for the nonrandom nature of smoking cessation, our research design relies on within-individual variation in smoking status to remove the influence of time-invariant unobserved differences across individuals that are correlated with both cessation and body weight. We find that smoking cessation is associated with a modest increase in weight (0.329 kg, 0.51 % off the mean) and no significant changes in the prevalence of overweight or obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ehb.2021.101045DOI Listing
July 2021

Cardiovascular health in young and middle adulthood and medical care utilization and costs at older age - The Chicago Heart Association Detection Project Industry (CHA).

Prev Med 2019 02 28;119:87-98. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States of America. Electronic address:

It is unclear how long-term medical utilization and costs from diverse care settings and their age-related patterns may differ by cardiovascular health (CVH) status earlier in adulthood. We followed 17,195 participants of the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project Industry (1967-1973) with linked Medicare claims (1992 to 2010). Baseline CVH is a composite measure of blood pressure, body mass index, diabetes, cholesterol, and smoking and includes four mutually exclusive strata: all factors were favorable (5.5%), one or more factors were elevated but none high (20.3%), one factor was high (40.9%), and two or more factors were high (33.2%). We assessed differences in the quantities (using negative binomial models) of and costs (using quantile regressions) for inpatient admissions, ambulatory care, home health care, and others between less favorable and all favorable CVH. All analyses adjusted for baseline age, race, sex, education, age at follow-up, year, state of residence, and death. We found that all favorable CVH in earlier adulthood was associated with lower long-term utilization and costs in all settings and the gap widened with age. Compared to all favorable CVH, the annual number of acute inpatient admissions per person was 79% greater (p-value < 0.001) for poor CVH, the median annual Medicare payment per person was $640 greater (41%, p-value < 0.001), and the mean was $4628 greater (67%, p-value < 0.001). The cost differences were greatest for acute inpatient, followed by ambulatory, post-acute inpatient, home health, and other. Early prevention efforts may potentially result in compressed all-cause morbidity in later years of age, along with reductions in resource use and health care costs for associated conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.12.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6434936PMC
February 2019

Favorable Cardiovascular Health at Young and Middle Ages and Dementia in Older Age-The CHA Study.

J Am Heart Assoc 2019 01;8(1):e009730

1 Department of Preventive Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University Chicago IL.

Background Data are sparse on the association of cardiovascular health ( CVH ) in younger/middle age with the incidence of dementia later in life. Methods and Results We linked the CHA (Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry) study data, assessed in 1967 to 1973, with 1991 to 2010 Medicare and National Death Index data. Favorable CVH was defined as untreated systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure ≤120/≤80 mm Hg, untreated serum total cholesterol <5.18 mmol/L, not smoking, bone mass index <25 kg/m, and no diabetes mellitus. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes and claims dates were used to identify the first dementia diagnosis. Cox models were used to estimate hazard ratios of incident dementia after age 65 years by baseline CVH status. Among 10 119 participants baseline aged 23 to 47 years, 32.4% were women, 9.2% were black, and 7.3% had favorable baseline CVH . The incidence rate of dementia during follow-up after age 65 was 13.9%. After adjustment, the hazard ratio for incident dementia was lowest in those with favorable baseline CVH and increased with higher risk factor burden ( P-trend<0.001). The hazards of dementia in those with baseline favorable, moderate, and 1-only high-risk factor were lower by 31%, 26%, and 20%, respectively, compared with those with ≥2 high-risk factors. The association was attenuated but remained significant ( P-trend<0.01) when the model was further adjusted for competing risk of death. Patterns of associations were similar for men and women, and for those with a higher and lower baseline education level. Conclusions In this large population-based study, a favorable CVH profile at younger age is associated with a lower risk of dementia in older age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.009730DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6405697PMC
January 2019

Association Between Prescription Drug Insurance and Health Care Utilization Among Medicare Beneficiaries.

Med Care Res Rev 2018 04 1;75(2):153-174. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

3 University of Illinois at Chicago, IL, USA.

Medicare Part D was associated with reduced hospitalizations, yet little is known whether these effects varied across patients and how Part D was associated with length of stay and inpatient expenditures. We used Medicare claims and the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey from 2002 to 2010 and an instrumental variables approach. Gaining drug insurance through Part D was associated with a statistically significant 8.0% reduction in likelihood of admission across conditions examined. Reductions were generally greater for younger, healthier, and male individuals. Across all conditions, mean length of stay decreased by 3.2% from a baseline of 5.1 days. Part D was associated with a 3.5% reduction in expenditures per admission, reflecting a decrease of $844 from a mean charge of $24,124 per admission prior to Part D. Thus, Part D was associated with statistically and clinically significant reductions in the probability of admission and length of stay for several common conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1077558716681920DOI Listing
April 2018
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