Publications by authors named "Crumley Carolyn"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Breath of Fresh Air: Odor Management to Maintain Patient Dignity: A View From Here.

Authors:
Carolyn Crumley

J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2021 Jul-Aug 01;48(4):359-361

Carolyn Crumley, DNP, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, Saint Luke's East Hospital, Lee's Summit, MO; University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, Missouri; and Section Editor JWOCN Evidence-Based Report Card.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WON.0000000000000777DOI Listing
June 2021

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Devices With Instillation/Irrigation: A Technologic Analysis.

Authors:
Carolyn Crumley

J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2021 May-Jun 01;48(3):199-202

Carolyn Crumley, DNP, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, Saint Luke's East Hospital, Lee's Summit, Missouri; University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, Missouri; Section Editor JWOCN Evidence-Based Report Card.

Purpose: The purpose of this technologic analysis was to critique technologic features of devices designed to deliver negative pressure wound therapy with instillation or irrigation (iNPWT).

Approach: Published literature regarding negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) devices with the added feature of instillation or irrigation was reviewed to provide an overview of iNPWT. Varied features of devices currently available in the United States were described based on instructions published by individual manufacturers. Safety information regarding iNPWT was derived from the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) Database.

Conclusions: The additional option of instillation or irrigation available with some NPWT devices may provide clinical benefits in carefully selected patients. Advantages may be related to facilitated removal of thick exudate and necrotic tissue. Devices with instillation options are indicated for inpatient settings, with ongoing monitoring of health care professionals. A simpler device with an intermittent irrigation option may be used in the home setting, with proper supervision. More research is needed to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness and cost of the therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WON.0000000000000760DOI Listing
July 2021

Single-Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Devices: A Technologic Analysis.

Authors:
Carolyn Crumley

J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2021 May-Jun 01;48(3):195-198

Carolyn Crumley, DNP, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, Saint Luke's East Hospital, Lee's Summit, Missouri; University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, Missouri; and Section Editor JWOCN Evidence-Based Report Card.

Purpose: The purpose of this technologic analysis was to evaluate single-use negative pressure wound therapy (sNPWT) devices.

Approach: Published literature regarding negative pressure wound therapy, particularly focusing on single-use or disposal devices, was reviewed. Varied features of devices currently available in the United States were drawn from use instructions published by individual manufacturers. Safety information regarding sNPWT was derived from the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) Database.

Conclusions: Single-use or disposable negative pressure wound therapy devices provide a safe and effective alternative to traditional negative pressure wound therapy. These devices promote healing of select open wounds and reduce complication rates in closed surgical incisions, when used in accordance with manufacturer guidelines. They may be used in any setting, but they are designed for use in home care and may be applied as a primary treatment option or following a course of traditional negative pressure wound therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WON.0000000000000761DOI Listing
July 2021

The Benefits of Active Engagement in Nursing Professional Organizations: A View From Here.

Authors:
Carolyn Crumley

J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2020 Nov/Dec;47(6):547

Carolyn Crumley, DNP, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, Saint Luke's East Hospital, Lee's Summit, Missouri; University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia; and Section Editor JWOCN Evidence-Based Report Card.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WON.0000000000000700DOI Listing
September 2020

Prevalence of Fecal Incontinence in the Acute Care Setting.

J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2016 Sep-Oct;43(5):517-22

Angela L. Stokes, MSN, RN, CWOCN, CFCN, Truman Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri. Carolyn Crumley, DNP, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, St Mary's Medical Center, Blue Springs, Missouri. Kathy Taylor-Thompson, MSN, RN, CWON, CFCN, Truman Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri. An-Lin Cheng, PhD, Statistics, University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of fecal incontinence (FI) and its associated risk factors in acutely ill adult hospitalized patients.

Methods: A cross-sectional design was used to collect data at 2 time points in 7 hospitals in the Midwestern United States. An investigator-developed tool was used by trained data collectors to identify pertinent patient characteristics, the presence of FI, and potential associated factors.

Results: The prevalence of FI in the 1083 patients assessed was 20% (n = 221). Prevalence rates from the 7 individual hospitals ranged from 16% to 30%. Medications were the most common associated factor (49%; n = 109), followed by neurologic diseases (40%; n = 89), and bowel motility disorders (30%; n = 67). The majority of patients with FI had stool consistency described as "loose unformed" (59%; n = 130) or "liquid" (25%; n = 55). Many patients had multiple potential risk factors for FI; 48% (n = 107) had 1 associated factor, 37% (n = 82) had 2 associated factors, and 8% (n = 18) had 3 or more associated factors. Age was associated with an increased likelihood of FI; the chances for FI increase 1.7% with each year of age. Unit type was also a significant associated with FI; patients managed in the intensive care unit were 78% more likely to have FI as compared to patients care for in a medical-rehabilitation unit.

Conclusions: Fecal incontinence is a common problem in hospitalized adult patients. Previously identified risk factors were also found in our sample.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WON.0000000000000265DOI Listing
August 2017

Post-thrombotic syndrome patient education based on the health belief model: self-reported intention to comply with recommendations.

Authors:
Crumley Carolyn

J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs 2011 Nov-Dec;38(6):648-54

St Mary's Medical Center, Blue Springs, Missouri, USA.

Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate patient responses to a patient education handout on post-thrombotic syndrome prevention based on the Health Belief Model.

Design: This quasi-experimental pilot study involved a patient survey to be completed after reviewing a patient education handout.

Participants And Setting: A convenience sample of 25 patients with deep vein thrombosis confirmed by venous Doppler assessment with a lower extremity deep vein thrombosis admitted to a Midwestern community hospital was identified. Seven patients were excluded and 5 declined participation; 13 completed the survey patients. Subjects were older than 18 years and able to read and understand English. Patients with hospice or palliative care service or life expectancy less than 6 months were excluded.

Methods: Subjects were provided with the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), patient education handout, and the PTS patient education survey. The PTS patient education handout consisted of a 1-page informational sheet based on PTS and Health Belief Model literature. The 24-item PTS Patient Education Survey required approximately 15 minutes to complete; items included demographic information, questions regarding previous deep vein thrombosis and Likert scale opinion statements regarding PTS based on Health Belief Model components. Patients meeting inclusion criteria were approached by the investigator, invited to participate in the study, and offered the option of having the investigator collect the survey or return in an addressed, stamped envelope.

Results: Respondents tended to agree that PTS was a serious condition and that it would negatively affect their life, primarily in relation to comfort and the ability to engage in leisure activities. Ten participants (76.9%) acknowledged that they were susceptible to PTS, and that elastic graduated compression stockings were effective. The most commonly cited barrier to wearing the stockings was difficulty with application. Five patients (38.5%) agreed that they had the ability to prevent PTS and 9 (69.2%) indicated that they intended to wear the stockings.

Conclusions: Patient education for post-thrombotic syndrome prevention based on the Health Belief Model resulted in self-reported intention to comply with recommendations to wear graduated elastic compression stockings. Compliance may be enhanced by specifically addressing individual risk factors and barriers to stocking application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WON.0b013e31822efc86DOI Listing
April 2012
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