Publications by authors named "Cristina Frange"

31 Publications

Development and validation of the sleep assessment instrument for older adults with pain.

Arq Neuropsiquiatr 2021 10;79(10):904-911

Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Departamento de Geriatria e Gerontologia, Serviço de Doenças Musculoesquelentas, São Paulo SP, Brazil.

Background: The co-occurrence of chronic pain and sleep disturbance contribute to a significant functional and social impact in older adults. However, there are no validated instruments to measure sleep disturbance and pain in this population that could be used to screen or diagnose individuals or monitor treatment effectiveness.

Objective: Our aim was to develop and validate a brief, practical, and comprehensive tool to assess the impact of co-occurring pain and sleep disturbance in older adults.

Methods: Development and validation of a measurement tool for assessing pain and sleep in older adults consisting of seven items.

Results: We applied the "Sleep Assessment Instrument for Pain in older adults" (SAIOAP) in a sample of 100 older individuals. A Cronbach's alpha of 0.602 indicated a moderate level of reliability, and item-total correlations of ≥0.4 for all items indicated good homogeneity. There were statistically significant correlations between the SAIOAP and sleep quality (PSQI, r=61.5), pain intensity (VNS, r=30.5), the multidimensional impacts of pain (GPM, r=40.5), depression (GEAP, r=45.5), comorbidity (r=27.9), and medication use (r=30.4). A ROC curve indicated a sensitivity of 73.2% and a specificity of 79.1% in relation to the prediction of sleep disturbances associated with pain in older adults.

Conclusions: The SAIOAP presented adequate metric properties and was demonstrated to be a simple and practical tool for the assessment of the impact of pain on sleep in older adults.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0004-282X-ANP-2020-0433DOI Listing
October 2021

Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the narcolepsy severity scale.

Sleep Med 2020 12 17;76:134-139. Epub 2020 Oct 17.

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil; Departamento de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Introduction: Narcolepsy type 1 is a sleep disorder and the most common cause of hypersonia of central origin. It is characterized by sleep attacks, cataplexy, sleep-related hallucinations, sleep paralysis and sleep fragmentation in a pleomorphic presentation. The Narcolepsy Severity Scale (NSS), questionnaire which assesses the frequency and impact of the main symptoms of narcolepsy was developed in order to determine its clinical severity, needing translation, cultural adaptation and validation in many languages. The objective is to validate the Brazilian Portuguese version of the NSS.

Methods: The Brazilian version of the NSS was translated to Brazilian Portuguese and applied to patients with a diagnosis of narcolepsy type 1 at the Daytime Excessive Sleepiness Service, at Psychobiology Department of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP) between February 2018 and July 2019.

Results: A total of 52 patients completed the questionnaire. Cultural adaptations were made to better comprehension of patients. The Brazilian version of the NSS showed high internal consistency, demonstrated by the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.82. It showed good reproducibility capacity, verified through the test-retest, whose intraclass correlation was 0.98. The average severity of Brazilian patients was 33.94 (±11.24), higher than the values found in other population, which also underwent validation of this scale. There was a correlation between sleep latency in diagnostic polysomnography and the NSS.

Conclusions: The Brazilian Portuguese version of NSS showed to be valid and reproducible tool for assessing the severity of patients with type 1 narcolepsy and have potential impact on clinical practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2020.10.016DOI Listing
December 2020

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with narcolepsy.

J Clin Sleep Med 2021 Apr;17(4):621-627

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Study Objectives: To the best of our knowledge, there has not as yet been any study on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients with narcolepsy, in particular, in relation to its impact on sleep schedules, symptoms, the need for medication, work, income, and quality of life. This study therefore aimed to explore these factors and their possible influence on sleep, circadian timing, and narcolepsy symptoms during the pandemic.

Methods: Patients with narcolepsy who had been in quarantine for at least 3 months completed a 36-question online survey. Questions targeted the conditions of the quarantine, sleep-related behaviors, and factors known to affect sleep and circadian rhythms (work status, income, appetite, narcolepsy symptoms, and medication), as well as the quality of life during the quarantine period.

Results: The routines of the participants had been altered by quarantine, with changes in their place of work, and an increase in narcolepsy symptoms, such as cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hallucinations, nocturnal awakenings, and sleepiness. Sleep and wake times changed, resulting in altered sleep patterns in most of the sample. No association between changes in the place of work and narcolepsy symptoms was found. Regarding medication, the participants used fewer antidepressant pills but took more stimulants. Appetite was increased and self-reported quality of life decreased during the period.

Conclusions: During the quarantine, the patients with narcolepsy reported changes in their bedtime and waking-up schedules, suggesting a tendency to circadian misalignment. In Brazil, the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak have gone beyond the direct action of the virus because of the collateral damage it has caused in respect to unemployment, financial hardship, and a reduction in quality of life. These impacts have been amplified in Brazil because of the level of social inequality found in the country, and they have particularly affected vulnerable patients with rare diseases, such as the narcolepsy population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.8952DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8020708PMC
April 2021

Mindfulness interventions during pregnancy: A narrative review.

J Integr Med 2020 Nov 31;18(6):470-477. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo 04023062, Brazil; Department of Gynecology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo 04024002, Brazil. Electronic address:

Pregnancy is a period of major transformations in a woman's life; increased stress, and mood and sleep disorders are frequent. This review evaluates mindfulness interventions during pregnancy and their ability to help manage stress, anxiety, depression, emotional regulation, level of mindfulness and sleep quality. A search of English language scientific literature relevant to mindfulness interventions for pregnant women was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science, without restriction on publication date. Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials with pregnant women, using mindfulness as an intervention for at least three weeks, in one of our main areas of interest, and using only validated scales to measure outcomes. Two hundred and thirty studies were identified in our searches of research databases, and thirteen were included in our analysis. We found a large diversity of mindfulness programs, heterogeneity among the instruments used to evaluate outcomes, and inconsistency in the gestational periods used in the studies. Mindfulness interventions were beneficial for stress, anxiety and depression. Mindfulness was also effective when applied in pregnant women with a history of depression or experiencing depression. Considering emotional regulation and the level of mindfulness, there were signs of improvement, but more studies are needed. None of the studies evaluated sleep quality. Our review provides information about current mindfulness programs, an overview of the effects of mindfulness interventions, a description of the measurements used so far, and recommendations for developing high-quality mindfulness protocols for pregnant women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joim.2020.07.007DOI Listing
November 2020

Exercise for "Sleep Rehabilitation" in Parkinson's Disease.

Mov Disord 2020 07;35(7):1285

Neurology and Neurosurgery Department, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.28136DOI Listing
July 2020

Narcolepsy Severity Scale: experience of a Brazilian Sleep Center.

Sleep 2020 09;43(9)

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsaa113DOI Listing
September 2020

The consequences of partial sleep restriction for habitual sleep duration, sleepiness and reaction time in healthy males.

Sleep Health 2020 12 22;6(6):814-821. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Sports, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Electronic address:

Objective: To investigate the effect of a reduction of approximately 25% in total sleep time (TST) on sleep parameters, sleepiness and reaction time (RT) in short, long and intermediate sleepers.

Design: Twenty healthy young men with a TST of ≤6 h (n = 6), between 6 h and 8 h (n = 7) and > 8 h (n = 7), respectively considered as short, intermediate and long sleepers, underwent 5 consecutive nights with an approximately 25% reduction in TST, produced by delaying their usual bedtimes. All participants were subjected to 6 consecutive nights of polysomnography and assessments of sleep, sleepiness and RT at pre- and post-sleep time. The Linear Mixed Model (LMM) was mainly used to assess the effect of the group, time, and their interaction on the main outcomes.

Results: Long and short sleepers showed the most significant changes regarding sleep parameters and sleepiness. However, short sleepers showed more lapses and more sleepiness.

Conclusions: We report novel evidence of the association between cognitive function (assessed via reaction time) and sleep restriction-related risks based on real-life since individual sleep schedules were personally determined. Both long and short sleepers showed the most significant alterations of delaying bedtime regarding sleep parameters and sleepiness. However, the short sleepers showed more sleepiness, attention lapses and increased reaction times.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2020.04.002DOI Listing
December 2020

Sleepiness comorbid to musculoskeletal pain is associated with worse quality of life and mood symptoms in a general population sample.

Sleep Sci 2019 Apr-Jun;12(2):79-87

Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Department of Psychobiology - São Paulo - São Paulo - Brazil.

Objectives: Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain and hypersomnolence (HPS) are very disabling conditions that may share some pathophysiological factors. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between MSK pain and HPS and its association with mood symptoms, fatigue, quality of life, and both objective and subjective sleep quality.

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Setting: General population based sample.

Participants: 510 individuals from EPISONO cohort, São Paulo (Brazil).

Measurements: All participants completed questionnaires, had clinical assessment and underwent a full-night polysomnography. HPS was defined according to Epworth Sleepiness Scale while the presence of MSK pain was defined by structured questionnaire. The sample was allocated into 4 groups: control (CTRL, n=281), HPS (n=141), MSK (n=50), and both conditions (HPS+MSK, n=38).

Results: MSK pain and HPS by themselves were associated with worse mood symptoms and quality of life. However, individuals with both associated conditions (HPS+MSK) presented higher frequencies of moderate to severe depression (44.1%) and anxiety symptoms (45.7%), as well as an additional decrease in quality of life compared to the other groups. There were no differences between HPS+MSK and MSK groups in objective sleep pattern. With regard to subjective sleep, HPS+MSK presented a higher prevalence of sleep attacks and cataplexy compared to all other groups.

Conclusions: The combination of MSK pain and HPS was associated with worse mood symptoms, quality of life and HPS-related features. This study suggests that sleepiness may be an important symptom to be investigated and treated in MSK pain-related conditions for a better quality of life.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5935/1984-0063.20190071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6922546PMC
December 2019

Lisdexamfetamine to improve excessive daytime sleepiness and weight management in narcolepsy: a case series.

Braz J Psychiatry 2020 20;42(3):314-316. Epub 2019 Dec 20.

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Objective: To report the successful use of lisdexamfetamine in the management of narcolepsy.

Methods: Five narcoleptic patients received lisdexamfetamine, at different dosages and for different periods, for management of excessive daytime sleepiness and weight control.

Results: All patients experienced improvement of excessive daytime sleepiness and lost weight without side effects.

Conclusion: Lisdexamfetamine appears promising for the treatment of two of the most common symptoms of narcolepsy: excessive daytime sleepiness and weight gain.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1516-4446-2019-0544DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236164PMC
June 2020

The influence of sleep quality and circadian preferences on upper extremity rehabilitation in stroke patients after constraint-induced movement therapy.

Int J Rehabil Res 2020 Mar;43(1):20-27

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo.

Our aim was to explore the influence of sleep and circadian preference on upper extremity (UE) rehabilitation in stroke patients after constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in a cross-sectional retrospective observational study. Forty-three patients were selected to complete questionnaires on circadian preference, sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, and risk of obstructive sleep apnea. They had undergone a 10-day standard CIMT program without medical complications and with normal to minimal cognitive dysfunction. All pre- and postrehabilitation scores (patient perception of the quantity and quality of use of the affected UE and self-quantification of motor ability) were analyzed retrospectively. All patients had improved perception of the quantity and quality of use of the affected UE and self-quantified motor ability. Patients with an evening-type chronotype demonstrated less improvement than those with morning and intermediate types. In addition, patients with poor sleep quality showed less improvement in functional ability than those with good sleep quality. Circadian preferences and sleep quality impacted the improvements in motor performance of patients with stroke after CIMT rehabilitation. This is the first study to suggest that rehabilitation sessions must respect the circadian preferences of patients and that sleep quality can affect outcomes. Future studies should investigate the relationship and mechanisms between circadian preference and poor sleep quality and rehabilitation outcomes on a larger scale.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MRR.0000000000000379DOI Listing
March 2020

Temporal Analysis of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Sleep in Postmenopausal Women.

J Clin Sleep Med 2019 02 15;15(2):223-234. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Study Objectives: To investigate the temporal association between chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) and sleep in women who are postmenopausal in a 10-day actigraphic study. This is a microlongitudinal study in which 52 participants were allocated to 4 groups women who are postmenopausal: control (CTRL, n = 10), chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP, n = 12), insomnia (INS, n = 15) and chronic musculoskeletal pain+insomnia (CMP+INS, n = 15).

Methods: All volunteers underwent a clinical interview and completed questionnaires, used an actigraph, and kept sleep diaries for 10 consecutive days.

Results: Women in the CMP+INS group presented more sleep episodes (mean of 1.02 episodes) and longer sleep latency (8.97 minutes), as well as higher pain intensity during the day compared to the other groups. Sleep duration recorded by actigraphy directly predicted pain intensity the following morning on waking, with a 1-unit increase in pain intensity, for every 6.9 minutes more of sleep. Higher pain intensity at bedtime was a significant predictor of both increased time in bed and sleep duration, meaning that for each 1-unit increase in pain intensity at bedtime, sleep duration increased by an average of 6.7 minutes.

Conclusions: Data showed that the coexistence of insomnia and CMP results in greater pain intensity and alterations in sleep homeostasis. Collectively, the data indicate that there is a bidirectional and directly proportional relationship between sleep duration and pain intensity in women who are postmenopausal with insomnia. This result strongly suggests that both sleep and pain conditions should be targeted in the treatment of women who are postmenopausal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.7622DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6374090PMC
February 2019

Sleep Disturbance and Pain: A Tale of Two Common Problems.

Chest 2018 11 27;154(5):1249-1259. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil.

Chronic pain has been associated with sleep disturbances in a bidirectional manner, with pain disrupting sleep, and sleep deprivation or disturbance increasing pain. This conventional view began to be reassessed with data from longitudinal and microlongitudinal studies investigating the causal relationship. In this review, we examine the current thinking on the temporal associations between sleep and pain, focusing on studies that considered whether sleep disturbances could predispose individuals to pain conditions. The evidence suggests that insomnia predisposes individuals to chronic pain or to the worsening of painful conditions. A limited number of studies are available that explore this outcome in relation to some of the most prevalent sleep disturbances, such as short sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, and sleep bruxism conditions. Despite consistent data showing that sleep and pain are related, there are still few longitudinal studies investigating sleep disturbances as a possible pathogenic condition of chronic pain. Because of the effect of pain and sleep problems on quality of life, investigating how sleep and pain are associated is key to improving health outcomes through better treatments and prevention strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2018.07.019DOI Listing
November 2018

Insomnia with Musculoskeletal Pain in Postmenopause: Associations with Symptoms, Mood, and Quality of Life.

J Menopausal Med 2018 Apr 30;24(1):17-28. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between insomnia (INS) combined with chronic musculoskeletal pain (MSP) in postmenopausal women and its characteristics regarding MSP, menopausal and mood symptoms, sleep and quality of life (QOL).

Methods: A cross-sectional control study in 4 groups of postmenopausal women: control (n = 15), MSP (n = 15), INS (n =15) and INS + MSP (n = 17). Sixty-two participants completed questionnaires and had blood collected, and 43 underwent polysomnography.

Results: INS was associated with increased anxiety ( = 0.04) and sleep fragmentation ( = 0.02); worse MSP severity ( = 0.00), MSP interference with daily function ( = 0.00), higher pain intensity at midday ( = 0.02) and menopausal symptoms ( = 0.00); and reduced QOL ( = 0.00). MSP was associated with increased anxiety ( = 0.02) and menopausal symptoms ( = 0.00), and reduced QOL ( = 0.05). In the whole sample, depression symptoms were higher but no statistical differences were found between groups ( = 0.47). Worse QOL was associated with both higher depressive symptoms ( = 0.01) and worse pain interference ( = 0.02).

Conclusions: INS + MSP was related to higher menopausal and anxiety symptoms, more sleep fragmentation and complaints of MSP severity and interference, more pain sites and worse QOL. The presence of INS was associated to more MSP. Sleep management is essential in women who have developed chronic MSP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.6118/jmm.2018.24.1.17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5949304PMC
April 2018

Women's Sleep Disorders: Integrative Care.

Sleep Sci 2017 Oct-Dec;10(4):174-180

Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Departament Psychobiology - São Paulo - SP - Brazil.

The integrative care model is rooted in a biopsychosocial approach. Integrative is a term which refers to increasing the harmony and coherence of your whole being, and integrative care is therefore focused on the person, not on either the disease or a therapy. It is provided collaboratively by a health team comprising physicians, psychologists, physiotherapists, acupuncturists, and meditation, nutrition, and floral therapy. Previous studies have demonstrated that interventions based on the integrative care model improved womens lifestyle and quality of life. Our aim was to describe the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) alongside traditional medicine among women with sleep conditions in our Womens Sleep Disorders Integrative Treatment Outpatient Clinic. We are sharing our experiences and clinical practice as the model we developed seems to have both physical and psychological benefits for women with sleep problems. We discuss the wide range of benefits that result from this type of complex intervention, and the contextual factors that may influence these benefits. This will inform future practitioners and we hope to contribute to quantitative research in the clinical setting. The study highlights the importance of treating sleep complaints with a caring relationship and a CAM approach, alongside conventional medicine. Exploration of the lived experience of CAM and its meaning enables healthcare professionals to gain insights into the patients needs, preferences, and values. Gynecologists, clinicians, and health care providers should support and guide patients in their decision to use CAM by providing evidence-based and comprehensive advice on the potential benefits, risks and related safety issues of this approach.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5935/1984-0063.20170030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5760052PMC
February 2018

Dopaminergic pathways for bruxism: a way forward?

Clin Oral Investig 2017 12 25;21(9):2875-2876. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Napoleão de Barros, 925, São Paulo, 04024-002, Brazil.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-017-2250-8DOI Listing
December 2017

Association between obesity and sleep disorders in postmenopausal women.

Menopause 2018 02;25(2):139-144

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil.

Objective: To investigate the relationship between obesity and sleep architecture in postmenopausal women.

Methods: One hundred seven postmenopausal women from the Ambulatory of Integrative Treatment for Female Sleep Disorders were invited by telephone to participate in this study. Fifty-three completed the study. We included women aged 50 to 70 years, and excluded women on hormone therapy or missing data. The study consisted of two meetings, including a full-night polysomnography. Menopause status was confirmed by amenorrhea for at least 1 year. Anthropometric measurements included: body mass, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and neck circumference. Participants were allocated into two groups according to BMI: nonobese group (BMI <30 kg/m) and obese group (BMI ≥30 kg/m).

Results: The obese group had significantly (P < 0.01) increased values of BMI, neck circumference, waist circumference, and hip circumference. WHR was similar between the groups (P = 0.77). Obese participants had significantly increased values of respiratory disturbance index (16.4 vs 9.3 n°/h) and apnea-hypopnea index (14.2 vs 5.6 n°/h). Rapid eye movement sleep latency was positively correlated to body mass (r = P < 0.01), BMI (P < 0.01), and hip circumference (P = 0.01). WHR was negatively correlated to sleep efficiency (P = 0.03). The linear regression model showed that BMI (P < 0.01) and WHR (P < 0.01) were positive predictors of rapid eye movement sleep latency.

Conclusion: In postmenopausal women, high BMI and abdominal obesity are sources of sleep disturbances, decreasing deep sleep, and sleep efficiency, while increasing the risk of obstructive sleep apnea.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GME.0000000000000962DOI Listing
February 2018

Sleeping for two: The importance of good sleep during pregnancy.

Women Birth 2018 04 12;31(2):e142-e143. Epub 2017 Aug 12.

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil; Department of Gynecology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil; Department of Gynecology, Casa de Saúde Santa Marcelina, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2017.07.008DOI Listing
April 2018

More sleep? An adaptive response to control pain after traumatic brain injury: Comments on article titled "Individuals with pain need more sleep in the early stage of mild traumatic brain injury".

Sleep Med 2017 09 15;37:218. Epub 2017 Jul 15.

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil; Departamento de Ginecologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2017.07.002DOI Listing
September 2017

Effects of Bach Flower Remedies on Menopausal Symptoms and Sleep Pattern: A Case Report.

Altern Ther Health Med 2017 Mar;23(2):44-48

Context • During the postmenopausal stage, women go through many remarkable changes, including physical, emotional, and hormonal. They also experience some unwanted effects, such as vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, and insomnia. The use of Bach flower remedies has been described as a supporting therapy for those symptoms. Objectives • The investigation aimed to evaluate the effects of the supplement on sleep pattern (ie, sleep perception and objective sleep) and on menopausal symptoms. Design • The research team created a case report. Setting • The study was conducted at the Menopause Transition and Postmenopause Sleep Disorder Clinic at the Department of Gynecology of the Federal University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil. Participant • The participant was a 53-y-old, single woman, at the postmenopausal stage, who had been diagnosed with insomnia according to the criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and complained of climacteric symptoms. Intervention • The patient underwent treatment with a blend of the supplement for 4 mo. Outcome Measures • Sleep questionnaires were given and polysomnography was performed before and after treatment. Results • Both sleep perception and objective sleep were improved. The patient's anxiety and menopausal symptoms were reduced after the treatment with the supplement. Conclusion • The use of Bach flower remedies as a therapeutic strategy to relieve menopausal symptoms, such as anxiety, mood changes, and insomnia, seems worthy of further investigation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2017

Menopausal symptoms and obesity: Is there a relationship?

J Pharm Bioallied Sci 2016 Oct-Dec;8(4):346-347

Department of Psychobiology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Department of Gynecology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil E-mail:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0975-7406.199338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5314836PMC
February 2017

Integrative medicine, quality of life and gynecological cancer : Comments on the article titled "Quality-of-life outcomes in patients with gynecologic cancer referred to integrative oncology treatment during chemotherapy".

Support Care Cancer 2016 Apr 13;24(4):1455-6. Epub 2015 Nov 13.

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Napoleão de Barros, 925, Vila Clementino, São Paulo, 04024-002, Brazil.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-015-3022-0DOI Listing
April 2016

Menopause Transition Symptom Clusters: Sleep Disturbances and Sexual Dysfunction.

J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2015 Nov;24(11):958-9

1 Departamento de Psicobiologia e Ginecologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP) , São Paulo, Brazil .

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2015.5537DOI Listing
November 2015

Circadian rhythms, insomnia and osteoarthritis pain.

Chronobiol Int 2015 27;32(9):1323-4. Epub 2015 Oct 27.

a Departamento de Psicobiologia and.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/07420528.2015.1082482DOI Listing
March 2016

The effect of menopause on objective sleep parameters: data from an epidemiologic study in São Paulo, Brazil.

Maturitas 2015 Feb 13;80(2):170-8. Epub 2014 Nov 13.

Departamento of Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Objective: Our objective was to investigate the influence of menopausal status on sleep patterns in a representative sample of women from São Paulo, Brazil.

Study Design: A population-based survey with a probabilistic three-stage cluster sample of the city of São Paulo was used to represent the local population according to gender, age (20-80 years) and socioeconomic status.

Main Outcome Measures: The female participants answered a sleep questionnaire, underwent polysomnographic recording and allowed their hormone levels to be measured. They also completed a gynecological questionnaire for classification of the reproductive aging stages: premenopausal or reproductive, perimenopausal or menopausal transition, and postmenopausal, defined as being after 12 months of amenorrhea. Women were allocated into early (the first 5 years after menopause) and late (after the first 5 years) stages.

Results: A total of 535 women were included in this study: 339 were premenopausal, 53 were early postmenopausal, 118 were late postmenopausal and 25 were using hormone therapy or isoflavone compounds. Our main findings were that women in postmenopause spent more time in N3 sleep, had a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and lower SaO2 compared with premenopausal women after an analysis adjusted for confounding factors. We found no significant differences between early and late postmenopausal women in the adjusted analysis.

Conclusion: Our results indicate menopause itself exerts a modest, but important influence on objective sleep patterns, independent of age, in particular on AHI and SaO2.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.11.002DOI Listing
February 2015

Sleep, pain and exercise: An integrative perspective on neuroscience education: Comments on article titled "Exercise therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain: Innovation by altering pain memories".

Man Ther 2015 Feb 7;20(1):e1-2. Epub 2014 Nov 7.

Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil; Department of Gynecology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil; Casa de Saúde Santa Marcelina, Brazil. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.math.2014.10.016DOI Listing
February 2015

Fibromyalgia and sleep in animal models: a current overview and future directions.

Curr Pain Headache Rep 2014 ;18(8):434

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Napoleão de Barros, 925, Vila Clementino, 04024-002, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Sleep disorders are highly prevalent in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Many of the daytime symptoms, such as chronic pain and fatigue, may be related to the non-restorative sleep patterns associated with the disease. Pain influences the sleep process and sleep disturbances decrease the pain threshold in a reciprocal framework. Thus, understanding the link between sleep and FM has become an important research topic in basic science. Therefore, in the current review we connect these topics and provide some insights into the cyclic relationship between sleep and pain, which has been addressed mainly in animal models. Additionally, we highlight the urgent need for sleep studies in FM animal models, which might improve the knowledge base and accelerate advances in this field.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11916-014-0434-3DOI Listing
April 2015

The impact of sleep duration on self-rated health.

Sleep Sci 2014 Jun 16;7(2):107-13. Epub 2014 Sep 16.

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brasil ; Centro de Estudos em Psicobiologia e Exercício (CEPE), São Paulo, Brasil.

Purpose: To review the association between sleep duration and self-rated health.

Methods: A search for original and review articles focusing on sleep duration and self-rated health was performed in PubMed. The general search strategy was [("sleep duration" OR "total sleep time" OR "time in bed") AND "self-rated health"].

Results: We found 22 articles in the English language; 8 articles with no direct association between sleep duration and self-rated health were excluded. Of these articles, 14 were considered potentially relevant and examined in detail, and 9 were excluded for not having self-rated health as the primary outcome. This work was compounded by 5 papers. The extremes of sleep duration (short or long) exhibited an interaction with poor or worse self-rated health.

Conclusion: The sleep duration issue should be considered when inquiring about health conditions, as this factor can lead to adverse results in global health status.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.slsci.2014.09.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521644PMC
June 2014

Chiropractic intervention in the treatment of postmenopausal climacteric symptoms and insomnia: A review.

Maturitas 2014 May 19;78(1):3-7. Epub 2014 Feb 19.

Department of Gynecology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil; Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Introduction: Insomnia is a frequent postmenopausal symptom and may be due to hormonal changes, depressive states related to this period of life, hot flashes or nocturia. Chiropractic care has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of these symptoms.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to review chiropractic interventions in postmenopausal women as a possible management approach to menopausal symptoms and insomnia.

Methods: A PubMed search was conducted by cross-referencing the key words insomnia, sleep, and menopause with chiropractic. The search used an end date of January 2014 and retrieved 17 articles.

Results: Three articles were eligible for the study. All epidemiological data from large surveys demonstrated a lack of evidence for chiropractic intervention as a complementary and alternative therapeutic method in the management of menopausal symptoms and insomnia.

Conclusions: There is no evidence for the effectiveness of chiropractic intervention as a complementary and alternative therapy for menopausal symptoms and insomnia. Further studies with proper methodological designs are warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2014.02.004DOI Listing
May 2014

The recent article by Schuh-Hofer et al. in Pain.

Pain 2014 May 7;155(5):1043-1044. Epub 2014 Feb 7.

Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2014.02.002DOI Listing
May 2014
-->