Publications by authors named "Cristina Cavaliere"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Myelodysplastic syndrome with del (5q) and JAK2(V617F) mutation transformed to acute myeloid leukaemia with complex karyotype.

Ann Hematol 2016 Feb 11;95(3):525-7. Epub 2016 Jan 11.

Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Section of Pathology, University of Turin, Via Santena 7, I-10126, Turin, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-015-2584-8DOI Listing
February 2016

Oligonucleotide Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization Approach in Hematologic Malignancies With Normal/Failed Conventional Cytogenetics and Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 2016 Feb;24(2):120-7

*Pathology Unit, Department of Translational Medicine ‡Department of Medical Sciences §Oncology Unit, Department of Translational Medicine, Amedeo Avogadro University, Novara †Cytogenetics Unit, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy.

Oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (oaCGH) was used to investigate 60 cases of hematologic malignancies, mainly acute myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes, in order to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity and to search for genomic alterations undetected by previous investigation with conventional cytogenetics (CC) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). On the basis of CC and FISH results, we subdivided the series into group A (36 cases with a normal karyotype after CC and/or FISH testing) and group B (24 cases with anomalies detected by CC and/or FISH). oaCGH did not show alterations in 21 cases of the group A (58.3%); in the remaining 15 cases (41.7%), it detected 19 new abnormalities (14 amplifications and 5 deletions). In the group B, oaCGH confirmed 32/55 aneuploidies detected by FISH (58.1%). The sensitivity increased at 27/33 confirmed aneuploidies (81.8%) by placing as a cutoff a mosaic of 50%. Moreover, in the cases of this group oaCGH revealed 36 new alterations (15 amplifications and 21 deletions). From these results it is possible to assess a strong overlap between results obtained by FISH and oaCGH. However, oaCGH is a reliable alternative where CC and FISH are not feasible and is able to identify new alterations unexplored by FISH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAI.0000000000000159DOI Listing
February 2016

Usefulness of multiparametric flow cytometry in detecting composite lymphoma: study of 17 cases in a 12-year period.

Am J Clin Pathol 2011 Apr;135(4):541-55

Flow Cytometry Unit, Pathology Department, Centre for Experimental Research and Medical Studies, Molinette Hospital, University of Turin, Italy.

Composite lymphoma (CL) is a rare occurrence of 2 or more morphologically and immunophenotypically distinct lymphoma clones in a single anatomic site. A retrospective analysis of 1,722 solid tissue samples clinically suggestive of lymphoma was carried out in our institute during a 12-year period to evaluate the efficacy of flow cytometry (FC) in identifying CL. We report 17 CL cases. A strong correlation between morphologic findings and FC was observed in 13 cases (76%). In the 4 cases diagnosed as non-Hodgkin lymphoma plus Hodgkin lymphoma, although FC did not detect Reed-Sternberg cells, it accurately identified the neoplastic B- or T-cell component. In 3 cases, FC indicated the need to evaluate an additional neoplastic component that was not morphologically evident. Our data demonstrate that FC immunophenotyping of tissues may enhance the performance of the diagnostic morphologic evaluation of CL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of a wide series of CL studied also by FC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1309/AJCPQKE25ADCFZWNDOI Listing
April 2011

Prognostic significance of microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in sinonasal carcinomas.

Hum Pathol 2006 Apr 8;37(4):391-400. Epub 2006 Feb 8.

Pathology Section, Department of Medical Sciences, Amedeo Avogadro University Medical School, Novara, Italy.

The prognostic significance of microvessel density and proliferative activity of the neoplastic cells, evaluated respectively by CD31 and Ki-67 positivity, and immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was retrospectively investigated in 105 cases of sinonasal carcinoma (80 surgical specimens and 25 biopsies). The most represented histologic types were intestinal-type adenocarcinoma found in 36 patients (34.3%), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in 34 (32.4%), mucinous adenocarcinoma (mainly made up of signet-ring cell patterns) in 15 (14.3%), and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 7 (6.7%). Microvessel density values (in vessels per square millimeter), VEGF, and Ki-67 were not dependent on histologic type but were rather correlated to the histologic grading in SCC. Clinical data were available for 92 (87.6%) of 105 patients, with minimum follow-up of 48 months. Most of the patients (81.5%) were at an advanced stage (T3-T4) at diagnosis. The values of all markers were correlated to tumor stage (P = .03). Multivariate analysis showed that both microvessel density and proliferative activity of the neoplastic cells were independent prognostic parameters (mortality hazard ratio, 1.33 and 1.60, respectively). Although VEGF expression was not correlated to prognosis on the whole series (P = .06), it was a powerful prognostic marker when the analysis was restricted to the group of SCCs (hazard ratio, 3.02; 90% confidence interval, 1.58-5.80). These results show that tumor neoangiogenesis, expressed by microvessel density, together with proliferative activity, is a pathologic marker with a strong prognostic impact in sinonasal carcinomas. Therefore, it may be a useful tool in this field so as to carry out therapeutic protocol planning, which may be further enhanced by the adoption of the more recent antiangiogenic molecules.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humpath.2005.11.021DOI Listing
April 2006