Publications by authors named "Cristiane Kovacs"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The effect of the a regional cardioprotective nutritional program on inflammatory biomarkers and metabolic risk factors in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease, a randomised trial.

Clin Nutr 2021 Jun 28;40(6):3828-3835. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: To evaluate the effect of the Brazilian Cardioprotective Diet Program (BALANCE Program) on inflammatory biomarkers, involved in the pathophysiology of the atherosclerosis, on inflammatory biomarkers, cardiovascular risk factors, and on plasma fatty acids in cardiovascular disease secondary prevention patients.

Methods: In this substudy of the BALANCE Program randomized clinical trial, a total of 369 patients aged 45 years or older, who have experienced cardiovascular disease in the previous 10 years, were included. These patients were randomized into two groups and followed up for six months: BALANCE Program group and control group (conventional nutrition advice). In the initial and six-month final visits, anthropometry (body weight, height and waist circumference), food intake evaluation by 24-h dietary recall, plasma inflammatory biomarkers (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, adiponectin, and C-reactive protein levels), blood pressure, glycemia, insulinemia, lipid profile, and plasma fatty acids levels were evaluated.

Results: The BALANCE Program group showed increased plasma alpha-linolenic acid levels (P = 0.008), reduction in waist circumference (P = 0.049) and BMI (P = 0.032). No difference was observed among plasma inflammatory biomarkers and clinical data.

Conclusion: After six months of follow-up, BALANCE Program led to a significant reduction on BMI and waist circumference in individuals in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease. Although plasmatic alpha-linolenic acid has increased, there was no impact on plasma inflammatory biomarkers.

Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01620398.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2021.04.035DOI Listing
June 2021

Implementation of a Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional (BALANCE) Program for improvement on quality of diet and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events: A randomized, multicenter trial.

Am Heart J 2019 09 21;215:187-197. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil.

Background: Appropriate dietary recommendations represent a key part of secondary prevention in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated the effectiveness of the implementation of a nutritional program on quality of diet, cardiovascular events, and death in patients with established CVD.

Methods: In this open-label, multicenter trial conducted in 35 sites in Brazil, we randomly assigned (1:1) patients aged 45 years or older to receive either the BALANCE Program (experimental group) or conventional nutrition advice (control group). The BALANCE Program included a unique nutritional education strategy to implement recommendations from guidelines, adapted to the use of affordable and regional foods. Adherence to diet was evaluated by the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. The primary end point was a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, stroke, myocardial revascularization, amputation, or hospitalization for unstable angina. Secondary end points included biochemical and anthropometric data, and blood pressure levels.

Results: From March 5, 2013, to Abril 7, 2015, a total of 2534 eligible patients were randomly assigned to either the BALANCE Program group (n = 1,266) or the control group (n = 1,268) and were followed up for a median of 3.5 years. In total, 235 (9.3%) participants had been lost to follow-up. After 3 years of follow-up, mean modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index (scale 0-70) was only slightly higher in the BALANCE group versus the control group (26.2 ± 8.4 vs 24.7 ± 8.6, P < .01), mainly due to a 0.5-serving/d greater intake of fruits and of vegetables in the BALANCE group. Primary end point events occurred in 236 participants (18.8%) in the BALANCE group and in 207 participants (16.4%) in the control group (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI 0.95-1.38; P = .15). Secondary end points did not differ between groups after follow-up.

Conclusions: The BALANCE Program only slightly improved adherence to a healthy diet in patients with established CVD and had no significant effect on the incidence of cardiovascular events or death.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2019.06.010DOI Listing
September 2019

Association between plasma fatty acids and inflammatory markers in patients with and without insulin resistance and in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, a cross-sectional study.

Nutr J 2018 02 21;17(1):26. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Background: Proinflammatory biomarkers levels are increased among patients with cardiovascular disease, and it is known that both the presence of insulin resistance and diet may influence those levels. However, these associations are not well studied among patients with established cardiovascular disease. Our objective is to compare inflammatory biomarker levels among cardiovascular disease secondary prevention patients with and without insulin resistance, and to evaluate if there is any association between plasma fatty acid levels and inflammatory biomarker levels among them.

Methods: In this cross-sectional sub-study from the BALANCE Program Trial, we collected data from 359 patients with established cardiovascular disease. Plasma fatty acids and inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) were measured. Biomarkers and plasma fatty acid levels of subjects across insulin resistant and not insulin resistant groups were compared, and general linear models were used to examine the association between plasma fatty acids and inflammatory biomarkers.

Results: Subjects with insulin resistance had a higher concentration of hs-CRP (p = 0.002) and IL-6 (p = 0.002) than subjects without insulin resistance. Among subjects without insulin resistance there was a positive association between stearic fatty acid and IL-6 (p = 0.032), and a negative association between alpha-linolenic fatty acid and pro-inflammatory biomarkers (p < 0.05). Among those with insulin resistance there was a positive association between monounsaturated fatty acids and arachidonic fatty acid and adiponectin (p < 0.05), and a negative association between monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and pro-inflammatory biomarkers (p < 0.05), as well as a negative association between polyunsaturated fatty acids and adiponectin (p < 0.05). Our study has not found any association between hs-CRP and plasma fatty acids.

Conclusions: Subjects in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease with insulin resistance have a higher concentration of hs-CRP and IL-6 than individuals without insulin resistance, and these inflammatory biomarkers are positively associated with saturated fatty acids and negatively associated with unsaturated fatty acids.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12937-018-0342-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5822607PMC
February 2018

Unsaturated Fatty Acids Improve Atherosclerosis Markers in Obese and Overweight Non-diabetic Elderly Patients.

Obes Surg 2017 10;27(10):2663-2671

Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo, 05403-900, Brazil.

Background: Several studies have demonstrated the benefits of replacing trans and saturated fats with unsaturated fatty acids on cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to demonstrate the effect of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat supplementation on the biochemical and endothelial markers of atherosclerotic disease in obese or overweight non-diabetic elderly patients.

Method: Seventy-nine patients were randomly divided into three groups: flaxseed oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil; patients in each group received 30 mL of oil for 90 days. Patients were subjected to anthropometric and bioimpedance assessments; biochemical and endothelial evaluations were performed through ultrasonography of the brachial artery and carotid artery for endothelium-dependent dilation and intima-media thickness assessment, respectively, before and after the intervention. The participants' usual diet remained unchanged.

Results: The flaxseed oil group had improved ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein levels (p = 0.074) and reduced carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) (p = 0.028); the olive oil group exhibited an improved apolipoprotein (Apo)B/ApoA ratio (p = 0.021), reduced CIMT (p = 0.028), and improved flow-mediated vasodilation (FMV) (p = 0.054); and similarly, the sunflower oil group showed an improved ApoB/ApoA ratio (p = 0.024), reduced CIMT (p = 0.048), and improved FMV (p = 0.001).

Conclusion: Unsaturated fatty acid supplementation using the three vegetable oils attenuated pro-inflammatory properties and improved prothrombotic conditions. Therefore, introducing or replacing saturated and trans fat with unsaturated fatty acids is beneficial for cardiovascular risk reduction in obese or overweight non-diabetic elderly people. Further studies are needed to determine which unsaturated fat best prevents cardiovascular disease in elderly patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-017-2704-8DOI Listing
October 2017

Association between polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory markers in patients in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Nutrition 2017 May 28;37:30-36. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the association between polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and inflammatory biomarkers among patients in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Methods: In this cross-sectional substudy from BALANCE Program Trial, we have collected data from 364 patients with established CVD. Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls and plasma FA concentrations were analyzed to estimate the FA intake. Inflammatory biomarkers measurement consisted of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor-α. After log-transformation of inflammatory biomarkers, multivariate-adjusted general linear model was used to examine the effect of FA intake. The association was adjusted for body mass index, waist circumference, energy, smoking status, age, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, physical activity, and calcium channel blockers.

Results: PUFAs were inversely associated with C-reactive protein levels (P = 0.006) and with IL-1 β. The increase of 1 g/1000 kcal in PUFAs, omega-3, and omega-6 reduces, on average, 6%, 48%, and 8% respectively, the mean concentration of IL-1 β.

Conclusion: Omega-3 and omega-6 FA intakes are inversely associated with inflammatory biomarkers among CVD patients. Additional studies on omega-3 and omega-6 intake in relation to inflammatory biomarkers in patients in secondary prevention of CVD are needed, particularly regarding dietary patterns that are rich in some sources of PUFA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2016.12.006DOI Listing
May 2017

The Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional Program to reduce events and risk factors in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease: study protocol (The BALANCE Program Trial).

Am Heart J 2016 Jan 15;171(1):73-81.e1-2. Epub 2015 Aug 15.

Research Institute, Hospital do Coração (IP-HCor), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

This article reports the rationale for the Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional Program (BALANCE Program) Trial. This pragmatic, multicenter, nationwide, randomized, concealed, controlled trial was designed to investigate the effects of the BALANCE Program in reducing cardiovascular events. The BALANCE Program consists of a prescribed diet guided by nutritional content recommendations from Brazilian national guidelines using a unique nutritional education strategy, which includes suggestions of affordable foods. In addition, the Program focuses on intensive follow-up through one-on-one visits, group sessions, and phone calls. In this trial, participants 45 years or older with any evidence of established cardiovascular disease will be randomized to the BALANCE or control groups. Those in the BALANCE group will receive the afore mentioned program interventions, while controls will be given generic advice on how to follow a low-fat, low-energy, low-sodium, and low-cholesterol diet, with a view to achieving Brazilian nutritional guideline recommendations. The primary outcome is a composite of death (any cause), cardiac arrest, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, myocardial revascularization, amputation for peripheral arterial disease, or hospitalization for unstable angina. A total of 2468 patients will be enrolled in 34 sites and followed up for up to 48 months. If the BALANCE Program is found to decrease cardiovascular events and reduce risk factors, this may represent an advance in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2015.08.010DOI Listing
January 2016

Is intake of vitamin D and calcium important for cardiovascular health in elderly obese patients?

Obes Surg 2012 Mar;22(3):437-44

Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, Sao Paulo, 04012-909, Brazil.

There is compelling evidence that bariatric weight loss reduces cardiovascular complications; however, these still tend to be the most common cause of late death after surgical intervention. In a prospective cohort study, correlations of dietary nutrients with indexes of vascular health were sought, with emphasis on vitamin D and calcium. Clinically stable obese outpatient subjects (>60 years old, N = 44) were interviewed about dietary macro and micronutrients. Nutritional assessment targeted anthropometric and bioimpedance analysis (BIA), hematologic counts, lipid profile, glucose homeostasis, and inflammatory markers. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), along with related vascular measurements, were documented, and results were correlated by uni- and multivariate analysis, corrected for known risk factors. IMT, FMD, and also brachial basal flow were positively influenced by vitamin D (P < 0.001). Calcium appeared beneficial for brachial basal flow only (P = 0.010). No association with IMT occurred, and a negative result for FMD was elicited. Also, vitamins A and B12 were advantageous for FMD, whereas iron was deleterious for IMT. Intake of many micronutrients including calcium and vitamin D did not meet recommendations. Vitamin D displayed a beneficial profile regarding vascular health, and more attention to this nutrient should be given, especially concerning obese patients with cardiometabolic risk. Calcium exhibited less straightforward results but deserves focus as well, along with antioxidant vitamin A as well as the B-complex which were mostly deficient in this experience.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-012-0593-4DOI Listing
March 2012
-->