Publications by authors named "Cosme F Buzzachera"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Commentary: Do Thirty-Second Post-activation Potentiation Exercises Improve the 50-m Freestyle Sprint Performance in Adolescent Swimmers?

Front Physiol 2019 18;10:215. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Faculty of Sport, Centre of Research, Education, Innovation and Intervention in Sport, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2019.00215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6431658PMC
March 2019

Effects of walk training with self-selected intensity on biochemical markers and anthropometric variables in women with obesity.

Obes Res Clin Pract 2019 Mar - Apr;13(2):211-213. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Universidade Estadual de Maringá (UEM), Maringá, Brazil.

To evaluate the effects of 12-weeks of walk training with self-selected intensity on lipid profile and anthropometric variables in women with obesity. Forty-eight women volunteers with obesity were randomly assigned into two training groups: self-selected walking group (SSWG; n=25) and control group (CG; n=23). There was improvement in biochemical markers only in the SSWG post-intervention (p<0.05), however no changes were verified in anthropometric variables (p>0.05). This study demonstrates that walking at self-selected intensity improved the lipid profile in women with obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2019.02.004DOI Listing
May 2020

Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Psychophysiological Responses to Maximal Incremental Exercise Test in Recreational Endurance Runners.

Front Psychol 2018 9;9:1867. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome "Foro Italico", Rome, Italy.

Previous studies have suggested that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) might improve exercise performance and alter psychophysiological responses to exercise. However, it is presently unknown whether this simple technique has similar (or greater) effects on running performance. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to test the hypothesis that, compared with sham and cathodal tDCS, anodal tDCS applied over the M1 region would attenuate perception of effort, improve affective valence, and enhance exercise tolerance, regardless of changes in physiological responses, during maximal incremental exercise. In a double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced design, 13 healthy recreational endurance runners, aged 20-42 years, volunteered to participate in this study. On three separate occasions, the subjects performed an incremental ramp exercise test from rest to volitional exhaustion on a motor-driven treadmill following 20-min of brain stimulation with either placebo tDCS (sham) or real tDCS (cathodal and anodal). Breath-by-breath pulmonary gas exchange and ventilation and indices of muscle hemodynamics and oxygenation were collected continuously during the ramp exercise test. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and affective valence in response to the ramp exercise test were also measured. Compared with sham, neither anodal tDCS nor cathodal tDCS altered the physiological responses to exercise ( > 0.05). Similarly, RPE and affective responses during the incremental ramp exercise test did not differ between the three experimental conditions at any time ( > 0.05). The exercise tolerance was also not significantly different following brain stimulation with either sham (533 ± 46 s) or real tDCS (anodal tDCS: 530 ± 44 s, and cathodal tDCS: 537 ± 40 s; > 0.05). These results demonstrate that acute tDCS applied over the M1 region did not alter physiological responses, perceived exertion, affective valence, or exercise performance in recreational endurance runners.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01867DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6189328PMC
October 2018

Commentary: Anaerobic Contribution Determined in Swimming Distances: Relation With Performance.

Front Physiol 2018 7;9:507. Epub 2018 May 7.

Department of Physical Education, North University of Paraná, Londrina, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00507DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5949358PMC
May 2018

Self-Selected Training Load and RPE During Resistance and Aerobic Training Among Recreational Exercisers.

Percept Mot Skills 2018 Aug 4;125(4):769-787. Epub 2018 May 4.

6 Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, WI, USA.

This study compared training load and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) during resistance training (RT) and aerobic training (AT) sessions at self-selected intensity. Participants were 54 recreationally trained subjects assigned to either RT or AT groups. During RT, participants performed three sets of 10 repetitions of each exercise at a self-selected intensity (load). After RT completion, participants performed one repetition maximum (1RM) and 10RM tests. During AT, participants performed a treadmill exercise at a self-selected intensity and duration (velocity and time). After AT completion, participants performed a treadmill maximal exercise test using a ramp protocol. During RT, subjects chose an intensity (43.6%-60.2% 1RM) below typical training recommendations, and RPE increased in successive exercise sets. During AT, participants chose an intensity (83.9% Heart Rate) in line with typical training recommendations, and RPE increased from the first to second quartile of the session (from a mean of 3.9, standard deviation [ SD] = 1.7 to a mean of 5.4, SD = 1.7; p < .05) and remained stable thereafter. These recreationally trained participants self-selected lower RT intensities than are typically recommended for strength and hypertrophy increases (>67% 1RM) and AT intensities in line with typically recommended intensity (64%-95% HR) for cardiovascular fitness increases. Thus, for recreational trained individuals to perform RT at recommended intensities, specific instruction will be required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0031512518774461DOI Listing
August 2018

ISOKINETIC ASSESSMENT OF MUSCULAR STRENGTH AND BALANCE IN BRAZILIAN ELITE FUTSAL PLAYERS.

Int J Sports Phys Ther 2018 Feb;13(1):94-103

Laboratory of Research Center for Exercise and Sport (CEPEE), Federal University of Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba-PR, Brazil.

Purpose/background: Strength asymmetries are related to knee injuries in intermittent sports players. The purpose of this study was to examine whether elite futsal players demonstrate strength asymmetries during knee isokinetic testing applying the Croisier et al.21 criteria.

Methods: Forty male elite (27.9 ± 6.5 years) Brazilian futsal players participated in the study. The testing protocol required players to perform concentric contractions of both quadriceps and hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60 °·s and 240 °·s and eccentric contractions of hamstring at 30 °·s and 120 °·s. Conventional (concentric:concentric) and mixed (eccentric:concentric) hamstrings/quadriceps (H/Q) ratios were calculated. Subjects were determined to have an imbalanced strength profile if an athlete had at least two parameters that were asymmetrical across speeds and conditions. Asymmetry was operationally defined as peak torque asymmetry greater than 15% in bilateral comparison, and H/Q ratio less than 0.47 for conventional and 0.80 for mixed conditions.

Results: Significant differences were observed between preferred and nonpreferred limbs in the concentric contractions of flexors at 240 °·s and eccentric contractions of extensors and flexors at 30 °·s and 120 °·s. However, these asymmetries did not exceed 15%. The conventional and mixed H/Q ratios were greater in the preferred than in nonpreferred limbs, but only the mixed hamstrings/quadriceps in the nonpreferred limbs showed values lower than recommended (<0.80). In addition, 50% of elite futsal players had preseason strength imbalances per the developed criteria.

Conclusion: The studied elite futsal players had preseason strength imbalances, which may increase the risk of hamstring injuries.

Level Of Evidence: 3.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5808018PMC
February 2018

Physiological, Perceptual, and Affective Responses to Six High-Intensity Interval Training Protocols.

Percept Mot Skills 2018 Apr 25;125(2):329-350. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

1 Department of Physical Education, 28122 Federal University of Paraná , Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.

This study examined the extent to which different high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and sprint interval training (SIT) protocols could influence psychophysiological responses in moderately active young men. Fourteen participants completed, in a randomized order, three cycling protocols (SIT: 4 × 30-second all-out sprints; Tabata: 7 × 20 seconds at 170% ⋮O; and HIIT: 10 × 60 seconds at 90% HR) and three running HIIT protocols (4 × 4 minutes at 90%-95% HR, 5 × at v⋮O, and 4 × 1,000 meters at a rating of perceived exertion (RPE) of 8, from the OMNI-Walk/Run scale). Oxygen uptake (⋮O), heart rate, and RPE were recorded during each interval. Affective responses were assessed before and after each trial. The Tabata protocol elicited the highest ⋮O and RPE responses, and the least pleasant session-affect among the cycling trials. The v⋮O elicited the highest ⋮O and RPE responses and the lowest mean session-affect among the running trials. Findings highlight the limited application of SIT and some HIIT protocols to individuals with low fitness levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0031512518754584DOI Listing
April 2018

Effect of low dose, short-term creatine supplementation on muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.

J Int Soc Sports Nutr 2017 7;14. Epub 2017 Feb 7.

Department of Physical Education, Research Group on Metabolism, Nutrition and Strength Training, Curitiba, Brazil.

Background: To determine the effects of a low dose, short-term Creatine monohydrate (Cr) supplementation (0.03 g.kg.d during 14 d) on muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.

Methods: Using a two-group matched, double blind, placebo-controlled design, nineteen male soccer players (mean age = 17.0 ± 0.5 years) were randomly assigned to either Cr ( = 9) or placebo ( = 10) group. Before and after supplementation, participants performed a 30s Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) to assess peak power output (PPO), mean power output (MPO), fatigue index (FI), and total work.

Results: There were significant increases in both PPO and MPO after the Cr supplementation period ( ≤ 0.05) but not the placebo period. There were also significant increases in total work, but not FI, after the Cr supplementation and placebo periods ( ≤ 0.05). Notably, there were differences in total work between the Cr and placebo groups after ( ≤ 0.05) but not before the 14 d supplementation period.

Conclusion: There is substantial evidence to indicate that a low-dose, short-term oral Cr supplementation beneficially affected muscle power output in elite youth soccer players.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12970-017-0162-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5296953PMC
January 2018

Repeated sprint ability in soccer players: associations with physiological and neuromuscular factors.

J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2017 Jan-Feb;57(1-2):26-32. Epub 2016 Mar 3.

Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between repeated sprint ability (RSA, 6×40 m [20+20 m] with 20-s recovery) and neuromuscular and aerobic fitness variables in male collegiate soccer players.

Methods: Twenty-six players (age 22.5±3.6 years) were tested on separate days for countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and standing long jump (LJ), and for maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max), velocity at onset of blood lactate accumulation (vOBLA), maximal aerobic speed (vV̇O2max), and peak blood lactate concentration (peak [La]). They were also tested for best and mean times on a repeated shuttle sprint ability test.

Results: RSA best time (r=-0.73 and r=-0.54) and RSA mean sprint time (r=-0.69 and r=-0.62) were significantly (P<0.01) correlated with LJ and CMJ, respectively. Significant correlations (P<0.05) were also found between RSA mean sprint time and sprint decrement with vOBLA (r=-0.44) and peak [La] (r=0.47), respectively.

Conclusions: This study showed that RSA performance had a large to very large association with the individual level of jump performance and to a smaller extent to aerobic fitness variables in male collegiate soccer players. Given this finding, lower limbs' explosive-strength performance should be regarded as a relevant factor for male soccer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0022-4707.16.05776-5DOI Listing
April 2017

HOW MOTIVATIONAL AND CALM MUSIC MAY AFFECT THE PREFRONTAL CORTEX AREA AND EMOTIONAL RESPONSES: A FUNCTIONAL NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY (fNIRS) STUDY.

Percept Mot Skills 2015 Feb 4;120(1):202-18. Epub 2015 Feb 4.

1 Center of Physical Education and Sport, State University of Londrina, Brazil.

Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, the present study investigated how listening to differently valenced music is associated with changes in hemoglobin concentrations in the prefrontal cortex area, indicating changes in neural activity. Thirty healthy people (15 men; M age = 24.8 yr., SD = 2.4; 15 women; M age = 25.2 yr., SD = 3.1) participated. Prefrontal cortex activation, emotional responses (heart rate variability), and self-reported affective ratings were measured while listening to calm and motivational music. The songs were presented in a random counterbalanced order and separated by periods of white noise. Mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated the relationships for main effects and interactions. The results showed that music was associated with increased activation of the prefrontal cortex area. For both sexes, listening to the motivational song was associated with higher vagal withdrawal (lower HR) than the calm song. As expected, participants rated the motivational song with greater affective valence and higher arousal. Effects persisted longer in men than in women. These findings suggest that both the characteristics of music and sex differences may significantly affect the results of emotional neuroimaging in samples of young adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2466/27.24.PMS.120v12x5DOI Listing
February 2015

How does music aid 5 km of running?

J Strength Cond Res 2015 Feb;29(2):305-14

1Group of Study and Research in Neuromuscular System and Exercise (GEPESINE), Center of Physical Education and Sports, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Madrid, Center for Brain Injury Rehabilitation (CRECER), Seville, Spain; and 3Department of Physical Education, North University of Paraná, Londrina, Brazil.

This research investigated the effects of music and its time of application on a 5-km run. Fifteen well-trained male long-distance runners (24.87 ± 2.47 years; 78.87 ± 10.57 kg; 178 ± 07 cm) participated in this study. Five randomized experimental conditions during a 5-km run on an official track were tested (PM: motivational songs, applied before 5 km of running; SM: slow motivational songs, applied during 5 km of running; FM: fast and motivational songs, applied during 5 km of running; CS: calm songs, applied after 5 km of running; CO: control condition). Psychophysiological assessments were performed before (functional near-infrared spectroscopy, heart rate variability [HRV], valence, and arousal), during (performance time, heart rate, and rate of perceived exertion [RPE]), and after (mood, RPE, and HRV) tests. The chosen songs were considered pleasurable and capable of activating. Furthermore, they activated the 3 assessed prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas (medial, right dorsolateral, and left dorsolateral) similarly, generating positive emotional consequences by autonomous system analysis. The first 800 m was accomplished faster for SM and FM compared with other conditions (p ≤ 0.05); moreover, there was a high probability of improving running performance when music was applied (SM: 89%; FM: 85%; PM: 39%). Finally, music was capable of accelerating vagal tonus after 5 km of running with CS (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, music was able to activate the PFC area, minimize perceptions, improve performance, and accelerate recovery during 5 km of running.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000627DOI Listing
February 2015

The Use of Session RPE to Monitor the Intensity of Weight Training in Older Women: Acute Responses to Eccentric, Concentric, and Dynamic Exercises.

J Aging Res 2014 13;2014:749317. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Parana, Caixa Postal 92, JD Botânico, 80215-370 Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

The rating of perceived exertion (RPE) is ability to detect and interpret organic sensations while performing exercises. This method has been used to measure the level of effort that is felt during weight-training at a given intensity. The purpose of this investigation was to compare session RPE values with those of traditional RPE measurements for different weight-training muscle actions, performed together or separately. Fourteen women with no former weight-training experience were recruited for the investigation. All participants completed five sessions of exercise: familiarization, maximum force, concentric-only (CONC-only), eccentric-only (ECC-only), and dynamic (DYN = CONC + ECC). The traditional RPE method was measured after each series of exercises, and the session RPE was measured 30 min after the end of the training session. The statistical analyses used were the paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and repeated measures analysis of variance. Significant differences between traditional RPE and session RPE for DYN, CONC, and ECC exercises were not found. This investigation demonstrated that session RPE is similar to traditional RPE in terms of weight-training involving concentric, eccentric, or dynamic muscle exercises, and that it can be used to prescribe and monitor weight-training sessions in older subjects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/749317DOI Listing
May 2014

Effect of body mass index on affect at intensities spanning the ventilatory threshold.

Percept Mot Skills 2011 Oct;113(2):575-88

Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraná, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to compare acute affective responses at exercise intensities based on the ventilatory threshold between normal weight, overweight, and obese women. 66 sedentary women (22 in each Body Mass Index group) performed a maximal graded treadmill test to measure their maximal oxygen uptake and ventilatory thresholds. Affective valence was compared at intensities spanning the ventilatory threshold (below, at, and above threshold). Affective valence below ventilatory threshold did not differ among the Body Mass Index groups. The obese group had a lower affective response at ventilatory threshold and above ventilatory threshold than the normal weight and overweight groups; the latter two groups did not differ. The obese group had a lower affective response than the normal and overweight groups, which corresponds to a less pleasant experience. Exercise prescriptions for obese subjects targeting intensities below ventilatory threshold can provide a more pleasant experience and may facilitate exercise adherence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2466/06.09.15.PMS.113.5.575-588DOI Listing
October 2011

Gender-based differences in substrate use during exercise at a self-selected pace.

J Strength Cond Res 2011 Sep;25(9):2544-51

Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.

The aim of this study was to investigate gender-based differences in substrate use during exercise at a self-selected pace. Seventeen men and 17 women performed a maximal exercise test and a 20-minute bout of self-paced treadmill walking to determine carbohydrate and fat oxidation rates. Gas exchange measurements were performed throughout the tests, and stoichiometric equations were used to calculate substrate oxidation rates. For each individual, a best-fit polynomial curve was constructed using fat oxidation rate (g·min(-1)) vs. exercise intensity (percentage of maximal oxygen uptake, % VO(2)max). Each individual curve was used to obtain the following variables: maximal fat oxidation (MFO), the peak rate of fat oxidation measured over the entire range of exercise intensities; fat(max), the exercise intensity at which the MFO was observed; and fat(max) zone, range of exercise intensities with fat oxidation rates within 10% of fat oxidation rates at fat(max). Although the MFO was similar between genders, fat(max) was lower in men than in women. Similarly, the "low" and "high" borders of the fat(max) zone were lower in men than in women. During exercise at a self-selected pace, carbohydrate oxidation rates were greater in men than in women, despite no gender-based differences in fat oxidation rates. However, fat oxidation contribution to total energy expenditure (EE) was greater in women than in men, despite no gender-based differences in the exercise intensity. In conclusion, although both genders self-selected a similar exercise intensity, the contribution of fat oxidation to EE is greater in women than in men. Interestingly, both genders self-selected an exercise intensity that falls within the fat(max) zone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181fb4962DOI Listing
September 2011

Validation of the OMNI-cycle scale of perceived exertion in the elderly.

J Aging Phys Act 2011 Jul;19(3):214-24

Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Rome Foro Italico, Rome, Italy.

This study examined the concurrent and construct validity of the OMNI-Cycle Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale, using elderly men and women. Seventy-six participants performed a load-incremented cycle-ergometer exercise test. Concurrent validity was determined by correlating OMNI-RPE responses with oxygen uptake, relative peak oxygen uptake, pulmonary ventilation, heart rate, respiratory rate, and respiratory-exchange ratio during a load-incremented cycle-ergometer protocol. Construct validity was established by correlating RPE derived from the OMNI-Cycle Scale with RPE from the Borg (6-20) Scale. Multilevel, mixed linear-regression models indicated that OMNI-RPE distributed as a significant (p < .05) positive linear function (r = .81-.92) for all physiological measures. OMNI-RPE was positively (p < .01) and linearly related to Borg-RPE in elderly men (r = .97) and women (r = .96). This study demonstrates both concurrent and construct validity of the OMNI-Cycle RPE Scale. These findings support the use of this scaling metric with elderly men and women to estimate RPE during cycle-ergometer exercise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/japa.19.3.214DOI Listing
July 2011

Psychophysiological responses to self-paced treadmill and overground exercise.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2011 Jun;43(6):1114-24

Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.

Unlabelled: Speculation exists that a positive affective response experienced during exercise may play an important role in predicting exercise adherence. Previous studies using self-paced exercise protocols have been associated with health benefits and pleasant experiences. However, all of these studies were conducted in laboratories, and consequently, the external validity of the findings may be questionable.

Purpose: To determine whether environmental settings (treadmill vs overground) differentially influence physiological, perceptual, and affective responses to exercise at a self-selected pace.

Methods: Thirty-four individuals (17 men and 17 women) between 18 and 30 yr volunteered to participate in this study. During the orientation session, individuals underwent an initial screening, anthropometric measurements, and familiarization with the experimental procedures. Next, subjects underwent a maximal treadmill test. In the two experimental trials, participants performed 20-min bouts of treadmill and overground walking at a self-selected pace, which were completed in a counterbalanced order. At least 48 h separated experimental trials.

Results: Using repeated-measures ANOVA, overground walking speed was significantly faster than treadmill walking speed (P < 0.01) during the 20-min bout of self-paced exercise. However, exercise intensity (%VO2R and %HRR) and perceived exertion during the session of overground walking were significantly lower (P < 0.05) when compared with those during the treadmill session. In addition, affective valence was more positive during the session of overground walking than during the treadmill session (P < 0.01).

Conclusions: These data extend previous findings by showing that environmental setting influences physiological, perceptual, and affective responses during exercise at a self-selected pace. Self-paced exercise performed over ground resulted in lower perceptual and more positive affective responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e318205874cDOI Listing
June 2011
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