Publications by authors named "Cornelia Haczek"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A strategy to establish a gene-activated matrix on titanium using gene vectors protected in a polylactide coating.

Biomaterials 2011 Oct 8;32(28):6850-9. Epub 2011 Jul 8.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich, Bavaria, Germany.

Bioactive implants are promising tools in regenerative medicine. Here we describe a versatile procedure for preparing a gene-activated matrix on titanium. Lyophilized copolymer-protected gene vectors (COPROGs) suspended in poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) solutions in ethyl acetate were used to varnish solid surfaces. The gene-activated PDLLA surfaces were first established on polypropylene 96-well plates. Vector release from these surfaces in aqueous buffer, cell viability and gene transfer efficiency to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was strongly dependent on the vector dose and its ratio to PDLLA film thickness. A detailed analysis of these relationships allowed establishing correlations which can be used to calculate suitable combinations of COPROGs and PDLLA yielding optimal gene transfer efficiency. This was verified with COPROG-activated PDLLA coatings on titanium foils. HEK 293 and mesenchymal stem cells expressed the BMP-2 gene comprised in the gene-activated surface in a manner that was consistent with the predicted dose-response and toxicity profiles found in NIH 3T3 cells. The systematic procedure presented here for identifying optimal coating compositions can be applied to any combination of vector type and coating material.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.05.071DOI Listing
October 2011

YB-1 dependent virotherapy in combination with temozolomide as a multimodal therapy approach to eradicate malignant glioma.

Int J Cancer 2011 Sep 6;129(5):1265-76. Epub 2011 Jan 6.

Institut für Experimentelle Onkologie und Therapieforschung, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany.

The human Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is known to be a promising target for cancer therapy. We have demonstrated that YB-1 plays an important role in the adenoviral life cycle by regulating the adenoviral E2-gene expression. Thus, we studied the oncolytic effect of the recombinant adenovirus Ad-Delo3-RGD, in which the transactivation domain CR3 of the E1A protein is ablated to enable viral replication only in YB-1 positive cancer cells. In vitro Southern Blot analysis and cytopathic effect assays demonstrate high anti-glioma potency, which was significantly increased in combination with temozolomide (TMZ), daunorubicin and cisplatin. Since vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is thought to promote the hypervascular phenotype of primary, malignant brain tumors, we also tested Ad-Delo3-RGD in regard to the inhibition of VEGF expression. Indeed, we found that Ad-Delo3-RGD induced VEGF down regulation, which was even amplified under hypoxic conditions. Tumor-bearing nudemice treated with the YB-1 dependent oncolytic adenovirus showed significantly smaller tumors than untreated controls. Furthermore, combination therapy with TMZ led to a regression in all treated animals with complete tumor regression in 33 % of analyzed mice, which was verified by bioluminescence imaging and histological studies. In addition, histopathological evaluation revealed enhanced apoptosis and a reduction in tumor vessel formation, indicating that Ad-Delo3-RGD has an anti-angiogenic effect in addition to its oncolytic capacity in vivo. Hence, our results demonstrate that the combination therapy of YB-1 dependent virotherapy and TMZ is effective in a xenograft glioma mouse model and might be useful in a YB-1 based clinical setting.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.25783DOI Listing
September 2011

Characterization of eight different tetracyclines: advances in fluorescence bone labeling.

J Anat 2010 Jul 26;217(1):76-82. Epub 2010 Apr 26.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Munich, Munich, Germany.

Polychrome sequential labeling with fluorochromes is a standard technique for the investigation of bone formation and regeneration processes in vivo. However, for human application, only tetracycline and its derivates are approved as fluorochromes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the fluorescence characteristics of the different tetracycline derivates to assess the feasibility of sequential in vivo bone labeling using distinguishable fluorochromes. Eight different tetracycline derivates were injected subcutaneously into growing rats as a single dose or sequentially in different combinations. After preparation of resin-embedded undecalcified bone sections, the fluorescence properties of the tetracycline derivates in bone were analyzed using conventional fluorescence microscopy, spectral image analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Each tetracycline derivate exhibited a characteristic fluorescence spectrum, but the differences between them were small. Chlortetracycline could be discriminated reliably from all other derivates and could therefore be combined with any other tetracycline derivate for reliably distinguishable double labeling. Tetracycline itself exhibited the brightest fluorescence of all the investigated derivates. Interestingly, in conventional microscopy the same tetracycline derivative can appear in different colours to the human eye, even if spectral analysis confirmed identical emission peaks. In conclusion, the data suggest that fluorescence double labeling of bone is feasible using appropriate tetracycline derivates in combination with spectral imaging modalities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7580.2010.01237.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2913014PMC
July 2010

Laser-modified titanium implants for improved cell adhesion.

Lasers Med Sci 2008 Jan 28;23(1):55-8. Epub 2007 Apr 28.

Lehrstuhl für Experimentalphysik IV, Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstr. 1, 86135, Augsburg, Germany.

Concerning dental implant systems, a main problem is the adhesion of peri-implant mucosa in the cervical region. The aim of the present study was to use a laser for modifying titanium implants to promote mucosal adhesion, which is indispensable as a biological barrier against bacterial infection. By the use of a KrF excimer laser, it was possible to induce a holey structure on the polished area of the implant surface, which was analysed by a scanning electron microscope. In addition, the attachment of fibroblast cells to the created structures was investigated with the aid of an environmental scanning electron microscope. It turned out that the cells preferentially attach to the holey structure. Thereby, the cells form bridges inside, leading to a complete covering of the hole. In this way, a more effective biological barrier against bacteria can be created.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-007-0460-zDOI Listing
January 2008

Effect of 308-nm excimer laser light on peri-implantitis-associated bacteria: an in vitro investigation.

Lasers Med Sci 2007 Nov 21;22(4):223-7. Epub 2007 Feb 21.

Department of Oral and Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Ismaninger Strasse 22, D-81675, München, Germany.

Dental implants are becoming increasingly important in prosthodontic rehabilitation. Bacterial infections, however, can induce bone loss and jeopardize clinical success. Recent literature has demonstrated that infrared CO(2) laser light is suitable for the decontamination of exposed implant surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of 308-nm excimer laser irradiation on peri-implantitis-associated bacteria in vitro. In this study, a XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) was used (Summit Technology, Boston, USA). Both aerobe (Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, Actinomyces naeslundii) and anaerobe microorganisms (A. odontolyticus, Prevotella melaninogenica) were tested. According to previous studies, a constant energy of 0.8 J/cm(2) and a constant frequency of 20 Hz were used for all irradiations. Colony-forming units after laser irradiation were counted. Excimer laser irradiation showed significant influence on the growth of all microorganisms. As compared to S. mutans and S. sanguis, A. naeslundii demonstrated higher sensitivity to laser irradiation. Anaerobe microorganisms, in contrast, demonstrated that a total of 200 pulses were sufficient to reduce the replication of these germs for more than 99.9%. Excimer laser irradiation (lambda = 308 nm) can significantly reduce both aerobe and anaerobe microorganisms. Depending on the parameters chosen, 200 pulses are sufficient for sterilization. New studies are necessary to evaluate if this wavelength is more of value in the treatment of peri-implantitis than other wavelengths or conventional therapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-007-0441-2DOI Listing
November 2007

New advances in fluorochrome sequential labelling of teeth using seven different fluorochromes and spectral image analysis.

J Anat 2007 Jan;210(1):117-21

Department of Oral and Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Germany.

Fluorochrome sequential labelling of mineralizing tissues is commonly used in different fields of clinical and basic research. Recently we improved polychrome fluorescent sequential labelling of bone by applying spectral image analysis to discriminate seven different fluorochromes. Although basic mineralization processes of bone and teeth follow comparable principles, the respective tissues differ in terms of matrix composition and mineral assembly. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the feasibility of this new technique for polychrome sequential labelling of teeth and to demonstrate the advantages in the field of dentistry. Furthermore, the exact labelled area of each fluorochrome could be measured, even in regions of overlapping fluorochromes. The technique presented may provide a basis for further investigations of mineralization processes of different anatomical dental structures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7580.2006.00660.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2100254PMC
January 2007