Publications by authors named "Corinne Benoliel"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact of growth temperature and surface type on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

Int J Food Microbiol 2015 Dec 19;214:38-47. Epub 2015 Jul 19.

Laboratoire Régional de Recherche en Agroalimentaire et Biotechnologies: Institut Charles Viollette, Bâtiment Polytech'Lille, Université Lille 1, Avenue Paul Langevin, Cité Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France; INRA-UMR UMET 8207 - Equipe PIHM, CNRS-INRA, Université de Lille, 369 rue jules Guesde, BP20039, 59651 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France. Electronic address:

Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on food-contact-surfaces represents a significant risk for the public health. In this context, the present study investigates the relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and the resistance to disinfectants. Therefore, a static biofilm reactor, called NEC-Biofilm System, was established in order to study the effect of growth temperature (20, 30 and 37°C), and of the surface type (stainless steel and polycarbonate), on biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These conditions were selected to mimic the biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces of food processing industries. The antibiofilm assays were performed on biofilms grown during 24 h. The results showed that the growth temperature influenced significantly the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These data also revealed that the growth temperature has a significant effect on the biofilm structure of both bacteria. Furthermore, the increase of the biofilm growth temperature increased significantly the algD transcript level in sessile P. aeruginosa cells, whereas the icaA one was not affected in S. aureus cells. Overall, our findings show that the biofilm structure and matrix cannot fully explain the biofilm resistance to disinfectant agents. Nevertheless, it underlines the intimate link between environmental conditions, commonly met in food sectors, and the biofilm resistance to disinfectants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2015.07.022DOI Listing
December 2015

Effect of culture conditions on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms to disinfecting agents.

Biofouling 2015 ;31(1):49-59

a Laboratoire de Procédés Biologiques, Génie Enzymatique et Microbien (ProBioGEM), IUT A/Polytech'Lille , Université de Lille1-Science et Technologies , Villeneuve-d'Ascq , France.

The relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and resistance to disinfectants was studied. Anti-biofilm assays were performed against biofilms grown at 20, 30 and 37°C on stainless steel and polycarbonate, over 24 and 48 h. A rise in growth temperature increased the resistance of 24 h biofilms to disinfectants containing didecyldimethylammonium chloride and decreased it to a disinfectant containing alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride. The increase in growth temperature coupled with an incubation time of 24 h promoted increases in both matrix production and the membrane rigidity of sessile cells. An increase in incubation time also increased both matrix production and the membrane rigidity of sessile cells. Such phenomena resulted in an increased resistance to disinfectants of biofilms grown at 20 and 30°C. The resistance of 48 h biofilms to disinfectants decreased with an increase in growth temperature despite the increase in matrix production and the membrane rigidity of sessile cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08927014.2014.993390DOI Listing
July 2015

Thermodynamic prediction of growth temperature dependence in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus to stainless steel and polycarbonate.

J Food Prot 2014 Jul;77(7):1116-26

Laboratoire de Procédés Biologiques, Génie Enzymatique et Microbien (ProBioGEM), IUT A/Polytech'Lille, Université de Lille Science et Technologies Avenue Paul Langevin, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France.

This study investigated the effect of growth temperature changes (20, 30, and 37°C) on the adhesion behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus to stainless steel and polycarbonate. Adhesion assays were performed under static conditions at 20°C. In addition, the validity of the thermodynamic and extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theories as predictive tools of bacterial adhesion were studied. The surface properties of the bacterial cells and the substrates of attachment were characterized, and atomic force microscopy was used to analyze the surface topography. The results indicated that the highest adhesion rate of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus on both surfaces was observed when the cells were grown at 37°C. The bacterial adhesion to stainless steel was found to be two times higher than to polycarbonate for both bacteria, whatever the condition used. The present study underlined that the thermodynamic and the extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theories were able to partially predict the empirical results of P. aeruginosa adhesion. However, these theories failed to predict the adhesion behavior of S. aureus to both surfaces when the growth temperature was changed. The results of the microbial adhesion to solvent indicated that the adhesion rate to abiotic surfaces may correlate with the hydrophobicity of bacterial surfaces. The effect of surface topography on bacterial adhesion showed that surface roughness, even on the very low nanometer scale, has a significant effect on bacterial adhesion behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-13-365DOI Listing
July 2014

Biofilm formation and persistence on abiotic surfaces in the context of food and medical environments.

Arch Microbiol 2014 Jul 18;196(7):453-72. Epub 2014 Apr 18.

Laboratoire de Procédés Biologiques, Génie Enzymatique et Microbien (ProBioGEM), IUT A/Polytech'Lille, Université de Lille1-Science et Technologies, Avenue Paul Langevin, 59655, Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France.

The biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces in food and medical sectors constitutes a great public health concerns. In fact, biofilms present a persistent source for pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which lead to severe infections such as foodborne and nosocomial infections. Such biofilms are also a source of material deterioration and failure. The environmental conditions, commonly met in food and medical area, seem also to enhance the biofilm formation and their resistance to disinfectant agents. In this regard, this review highlights the effect of environmental conditions on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces in the context of food and medical environment. It also describes the current and emergent strategies used to study the biofilm formation and its eradication. The mechanisms of biofilm resistance to commercialized disinfectants are also discussed, since this phenomenon remains unclear to date.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-014-0983-1DOI Listing
July 2014

Effect of growth temperature, surface type and incubation time on the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2014 Mar 16;98(6):2597-607. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Laboratoire de Procédés Biologiques, Génie Enzymatique et Microbien (ProBioGEM), IUT A/Polytech'Lille, Université de Lille 1-Science et Technologies, Avenue Paul Langevin, 59655, Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France.

The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of the environmental conditions such as the temperature change, incubation time and surface type on the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants. The antibiofilm assays were performed against biofilms grown at 20 °C, 30 °C and 37 °C, on the stainless steel and polycarbonate, during 24 and 48 h. The involvement of the biofilm matrix and the bacterial membrane fluidity in the resistance of sessile cells were investigated. Our results show that the efficiency of disinfectants was dependent on the growth temperature, the surface type and the disinfectant product. The increase of growth temperature from 20 °C to 37 °C, with an incubation time of 24 h, increased the resistance of biofilms to cationic antimicrobials. This change of growth temperature did not affect the major content of the biofilm matrix, but it decreased the membrane fluidity of sessile cells through the increase of the anteiso-C19 relative amount. The increase of the biofilm resistance to disinfectants, with the rise of the incubation time, was dependent on both growth temperature and disinfectant product. The increase of the biofilm age also promoted increases in the matrix production and the membrane fluidity of sessile cells. The resistance of S. aureus biofilm seems to depend on the environment of the biofilm formation and involves both extracellular matrix and membrane fluidity of sessile cells. Our study represents the first report describing the impact of environmental conditions on the matrix production, sessile cells membrane fluidity and resistance of S. aureus biofilms to disinfectants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-013-5479-4DOI Listing
March 2014