Publications by authors named "Corey Pollock"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

100 pT/cm single-point MEMS magnetic gradiometer from a commercial accelerometer.

Microsyst Nanoeng 2020 10;6:71. Epub 2020 Aug 10.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 USA.

Magnetic sensing is present in our everyday interactions with consumer electronics and demonstrates the potential for the measurement of extremely weak biomagnetic fields, such as those of the heart and brain. In this work, we leverage the many benefits of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices to fabricate a small, low-power, and inexpensive sensor whose resolution is in the range of biomagnetic fields. At present, biomagnetic fields are measured only by expensive mechanisms such as optical pumping and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), suggesting a large opportunity for MEMS technology in this work. The prototype fabrication is achieved by assembling micro-objects, including a permanent micromagnet, onto a postrelease commercial MEMS accelerometer using a pick-and-place technique. With this system, we demonstrate a room-temperature MEMS magnetic gradiometer. In air, the sensor's response is linear, with a resolution of 1.1 nT cm, spans over 3 decades of dynamic range to 4.6 µT cm, and is capable of off-resonance measurements at low frequencies. In a 1 mTorr vacuum with 20 dB magnetic shielding, the sensor achieves a 100 pT cm resolution at resonance. This resolution represents a 30-fold improvement compared with that of MEMS magnetometer technology and a 1000-fold improvement compared with that of MEMS gradiometer technology. The sensor is capable of a small spatial resolution with a magnetic sensing element of 0.25 mm along its sensitive axis, a >4-fold improvement compared with that of MEMS gradiometer technology. The calculated noise floor of this platform is 110 fT cm Hz, and thus, these devices hold promise for both magnetocardiography (MCG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41378-020-0173-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8433323PMC
August 2020

TLR4: the fall guy in sepsis?

Cell Stress 2020 Nov 9;4(12):270-272. Epub 2020 Nov 9.

Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute of Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic 3086, Australia.

Sepsis and its impact on human health can be traced back to 1000 BC and continues to be a major health burden today. It causes about 11 million deaths world-wide of which, more than a third are due to neonatal sepsis. There is no effective treatment other than fluid resuscitation therapy and antibiotic treatment that leave patients immunosuppressed and vulnerable to nosocomial infections. Added to that, ageing population and the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria pose new challenges. Most of the deleterious effects of sepsis are due to the host response to the systemic infection. In the initial phase of infection, hyper activation of the immune system leads to cytokine storm, which could lead to organ failure and this accounts for about 15% of overall deaths. However, the subsequent immune paralysis phase (mostly attributed to apoptotic death of immune cells) accounts for about 85% of all deaths. Past clinical trials (more than 100 in the last 30 years) all targeted the inflammatory phase with little success, predictably, for inflammation is a necessary process to fight infection. In order to identify the regulators of immune cell death during sepsis, we carried out an unbiased, whole genome CRISPR screening in mice and identified Trigger Receptor Expressed in Myeloid-like 4 (Treml4) as the receptor that controls both the inflammatory phase and the immune suppression phase in sepsis (Nedeva (2020) Nature Immunol, doi: 10.1038/s41590-020-0789-z). Characterising the gene knockout mice revealed new insights into the relative roles of TLR4 and TREML4 in inducing the inflammatory cytokine storm during sepsis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15698/cst2020.12.237DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7713263PMC
November 2020

Organic staining on bone from exposure to wood and other plant materials.

Forensic Sci Int 2018 Feb 21;283:200-210. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

University of South Florida, Department of Anthropology, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620, United States.

Determining the depositional environment and the postmortem alterations to a set of remains are necessary aspects of a forensic investigation to explain the circumstances surrounding the death of an individual. The present study examines organic staining as a method for reconstructing the depositional environment of skeletal remains and the taphonomic agents with which they came into contact. Organic staining results largely from tannins leaching from plant materials and therefore can be seen on bone deposited in wooden coffin environments or on terrestrial surfaces. The present study examines the hypothesis that the degree of staining observed on skeletal elements would increase as the length of exposure to the organic matter increased and that different plant materials and environments would leave different patterns or colorations of staining. The sample consisted of 165 pig (Sus scrofa) femora divided into four groups exposed to differing experimental conditions, including burial in direct contact with soil or burial in a simulated coffin environment, immersion in water with wood samples, and surface deposition with plant matter contact. The bones were removed once a month from their experimental environments and the level of staining was recorded qualitatively using the Munsell Soil Color Chart. In all of the experimental environments, staining was present after two months of exposure, and the color darkened across the bone surface with each episode of data collection. The results from the present study indicate that staining can manifest on bone within a relatively short time frame once skeletonization occurs and a variety of colorations or patterns of staining can manifest based on the plant material. The present research also demonstrates the potential of organic staining to aid in estimations of the postmortem interval as well as a depositional environmental reconstruction through plant species identification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.12.021DOI Listing
February 2018

Beam shaping with tip-tilt varifocal mirror for indoor optical wireless communication.

Opt Express 2017 Aug;25(17):20274-20285

MEMS mirrors are currently used in many applications to steer beams of light. An area of continued research is developing mirrors with varifocal capability that allows the beam to be shaped and focused. In this work, we study the varifocal capability of a 380 μm diameter, thermally actuated MEMS mirror with a ± 40° tip-tilt angle and a radius of curvature between -0.48 mm to 20.5 mm. Light is coupled to the mirror via a single mode optical fiber, similar to an indoor optical wireless communication architecture. The performance of the mirror is characterized with respect to (1) the profile of the reflected beam as the mirror deforms and (2) the mirror's impact when integrated into an optical communication system. We found that the mirror can focus light to a beam with a 0.18° half-angle divergence. Additionally, the ability to change the shape of fiberized light from a wide to narrow beam provides an unmatched level of dynamic control and significantly improves the bit error rate in an optical communication system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.25.020274DOI Listing
August 2017
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