Publications by authors named "Connie T R M Stumpel"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

NEXMIF encephalopathy: an X-linked disorder with male and female phenotypic patterns.

Genet Med 2021 Feb 4;23(2):363-373. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Department of Clinical Genomics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Purpose: Pathogenic variants in the X-linked gene NEXMIF (previously KIAA2022) are associated with intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder, and epilepsy. We aimed to delineate the female and male phenotypic spectrum of NEXMIF encephalopathy.

Methods: Through an international collaboration, we analyzed the phenotypes and genotypes of 87 patients with NEXMIF encephalopathy.

Results: Sixty-three females and 24 males (46 new patients) with NEXMIF encephalopathy were studied, with 30 novel variants. Phenotypic features included developmental delay/ID in 86/87 (99%), seizures in 71/86 (83%) and multiple comorbidities. Generalized seizures predominated including myoclonic seizures and absence seizures (both 46/70, 66%), absence with eyelid myoclonia (17/70, 24%), and atonic seizures (30/70, 43%). Males had more severe developmental impairment; females had epilepsy more frequently, and varied from unaffected to severely affected. All NEXMIF pathogenic variants led to a premature stop codon or were deleterious structural variants. Most arose de novo, although X-linked segregation occurred for both sexes. Somatic mosaicism occurred in two males and a family with suspected parental mosaicism.

Conclusion: NEXMIF encephalopathy is an X-linked, generalized developmental and epileptic encephalopathy characterized by myoclonic-atonic epilepsy overlapping with eyelid myoclonia with absence. Some patients have developmental encephalopathy without epilepsy. Males have more severe developmental impairment. NEXMIF encephalopathy arises due to loss-of-function variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-00988-9DOI Listing
February 2021

Impaired iloprost-induced platelet inhibition and phosphoproteome changes in patients with confirmed pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia, linked to genetic mutations in GNAS.

Sci Rep 2020 07 9;10(1):11389. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Patients diagnosed with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia) suffer from hormonal resistance and abnormal postural features, in a condition classified as Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) syndrome. This syndrome is linked to a maternally inherited mutation in the GNAS complex locus, encoding for the GTPase subunit Gsα. Here, we investigated how platelet phenotype and omics analysis can assist in the often difficult diagnosis. By coupling to the IP receptor, Gsα induces platelet inhibition via adenylyl cyclase and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In platelets from seven patients with suspected AHO, one of the largest cohorts examined, we studied the PKA-induced phenotypic changes. Five patients with a confirmed GNAS mutation, displayed impairments in Gsα-dependent VASP phosphorylation, aggregation, and microfluidic thrombus formation. Analysis of the platelet phosphoproteome revealed 2,516 phosphorylation sites, of which 453 were regulated by Gsα-PKA. Common changes in the patients were: (1) a joint panel of upregulated and downregulated phosphopeptides; (2) overall PKA dependency of the upregulated phosphopeptides; (3) links to key platelet function pathways. In one patient with GNAS mutation, diagnosed as non-AHO, the changes in platelet phosphoproteome were reversed. This combined approach thus revealed multiple phenotypic and molecular biomarkers to assist in the diagnosis of suspected PHP Ia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-68379-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7347634PMC
July 2020

CHD3 helicase domain mutations cause a neurodevelopmental syndrome with macrocephaly and impaired speech and language.

Nat Commun 2018 11 5;9(1):4619. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, Département de Génétique, Paris, 75013, France.

Chromatin remodeling is of crucial importance during brain development. Pathogenic alterations of several chromatin remodeling ATPases have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. We describe an index case with a de novo missense mutation in CHD3, identified during whole genome sequencing of a cohort of children with rare speech disorders. To gain a comprehensive view of features associated with disruption of this gene, we use a genotype-driven approach, collecting and characterizing 35 individuals with de novo CHD3 mutations and overlapping phenotypes. Most mutations cluster within the ATPase/helicase domain of the encoded protein. Modeling their impact on the three-dimensional structure demonstrates disturbance of critical binding and interaction motifs. Experimental assays with six of the identified mutations show that a subset directly affects ATPase activity, and all but one yield alterations in chromatin remodeling. We implicate de novo CHD3 mutations in a syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, macrocephaly, and impaired speech and language.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06014-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6218476PMC
November 2018

PURA syndrome: clinical delineation and genotype-phenotype study in 32 individuals with review of published literature.

J Med Genet 2018 02 2;55(2):104-113. Epub 2017 Nov 2.

Department of Pediatric Neurology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Background: De novo mutations in have recently been described to cause PURA syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, feeding difficulties and neonatal hypotonia.

Objectives: To delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome and study genotype-phenotype correlations.

Methods: Diagnostic or research-based exome or Sanger sequencing was performed in individuals with ID. We systematically collected clinical and mutation data on newly ascertained PURA syndrome individuals, evaluated data of previously reported individuals and performed a computational analysis of photographs. We classified mutations based on predicted effect using 3D in silico models of crystal structures of -derived Pur-alpha homologues. Finally, we explored genotype-phenotype correlations by analysis of both recurrent mutations as well as mutation classes.

Results: We report mutations in (purine-rich element binding protein A) in 32 individuals, the largest cohort described so far. Evaluation of clinical data, including 22 previously published cases, revealed that all have moderate to severe ID and neonatal-onset symptoms, including hypotonia (96%), respiratory problems (57%), feeding difficulties (77%), exaggerated startle response (44%), hypersomnolence (66%) and hypothermia (35%). Epilepsy (54%) and gastrointestinal (69%), ophthalmological (51%) and endocrine problems (42%) were observed frequently. Computational analysis of facial photographs showed subtle facial dysmorphism. No strong genotype-phenotype correlation was identified by subgrouping mutations into functional classes.

Conclusion: We delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome with the identification of 32 additional individuals. The identification of one individual through targeted Sanger sequencing points towards the clinical recognisability of the syndrome. Genotype-phenotype analysis showed no significant correlation between mutation classes and disease severity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2017-104946DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5800346PMC
February 2018

Functional convergence of histone methyltransferases EHMT1 and KMT2C involved in intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder.

PLoS Genet 2017 Oct 25;13(10):e1006864. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.

Kleefstra syndrome, caused by haploinsufficiency of euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1), is characterized by intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), characteristic facial dysmorphisms, and other variable clinical features. In addition to EHMT1 mutations, de novo variants were reported in four additional genes (MBD5, SMARCB1, NR1I3, and KMT2C), in single individuals with clinical characteristics overlapping Kleefstra syndrome. Here, we present a novel cohort of five patients with de novo loss of function mutations affecting the histone methyltransferase KMT2C. Our clinical data delineates the KMT2C phenotypic spectrum and reinforces the phenotypic overlap with Kleefstra syndrome and other related ID disorders. To elucidate the common molecular basis of the neuropathology associated with mutations in KMT2C and EHMT1, we characterized the role of the Drosophila KMT2C ortholog, trithorax related (trr), in the nervous system. Similar to the Drosophila EHMT1 ortholog, G9a, trr is required in the mushroom body for short term memory. Trr ChIP-seq identified 3371 binding sites, mainly in the promoter of genes involved in neuronal processes. Transcriptional profiling of pan-neuronal trr knockdown and G9a null mutant fly heads identified 613 and 1123 misregulated genes, respectively. These gene sets show a significant overlap and are associated with nearly identical gene ontology enrichments. The majority of the observed biological convergence is derived from predicted indirect target genes. However, trr and G9a also have common direct targets, including the Drosophila ortholog of Arc (Arc1), a key regulator of synaptic plasticity. Our data highlight the clinical and molecular convergence between the KMT2 and EHMT protein families, which may contribute to a molecular network underlying a larger group of ID/ASD-related disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1006864DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5656305PMC
October 2017

TSC2 c.1864C>T variant associated with mild cases of tuberous sclerosis complex.

Am J Med Genet A 2017 Mar;173(3):771-775

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder with variable expressivity associated with hamartomatous tumors, abnormalities of the skin, and neurologic problems including seizures, intellectual disability, and autism. TSC is caused by pathogenic variants in either TSC1 or TSC2. In general, TSC2 pathogenic variants are associated with a more severe phenotype than TSC1 pathogenic variants. Here, we report a pathogenic TSC2 variant, c.1864C>T, p.(Arg622Trp), associated with a mild phenotype, with most carriers meeting fewer than two major clinical diagnostic criteria for TSC. This finding has significant implications for counseling patients regarding prognosis. More patient data are required before changing the surveillance recommendations for patients with the reported variant. However, consideration should be given to tailoring surveillance recommendations for all pathogenic TSC1 and TSC2 variants with documented milder clinical sequelae. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.38083DOI Listing
March 2017

De Novo Mutations in SON Disrupt RNA Splicing of Genes Essential for Brain Development and Metabolism, Causing an Intellectual-Disability Syndrome.

Am J Hum Genet 2016 09 18;99(3):711-719. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA.

The overall understanding of the molecular etiologies of intellectual disability (ID) and developmental delay (DD) is increasing as next-generation sequencing technologies identify genetic variants in individuals with such disorders. However, detailed analyses conclusively confirming these variants, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the diseases, are often lacking. Here, we report on an ID syndrome caused by de novo heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) mutations in SON. The syndrome is characterized by ID and/or DD, malformations of the cerebral cortex, epilepsy, vision problems, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital malformations. Knockdown of son in zebrafish resulted in severe malformation of the spine, brain, and eyes. Importantly, analyses of RNA from affected individuals revealed that genes critical for neuronal migration and cortex organization (TUBG1, FLNA, PNKP, WDR62, PSMD3, and HDAC6) and metabolism (PCK2, PFKL, IDH2, ACY1, and ADA) are significantly downregulated because of the accumulation of mis-spliced transcripts resulting from erroneous SON-mediated RNA splicing. Our data highlight SON as a master regulator governing neurodevelopment and demonstrate the importance of SON-mediated RNA splicing in human development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.06.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5011044PMC
September 2016

Effect of comprehensive oncogenetics training interventions for general practitioners, evaluated at multiple performance levels.

PLoS One 2015 2;10(4):e0122648. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

School for Public Health and Primary Care, Department of Family Medicine, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

General practitioners (GPs) are increasingly called upon to identify patients at risk for hereditary cancers, and their genetic competencies need to be enhanced. This article gives an overview of a research project on how to build effective educational modules on genetics, assessed by randomized controlled trials (RCTs), reflecting the prioritized educational needs of primary care physicians. It also reports on an ongoing study to investigate long-term increase in genetic consultation skills (1-year follow-up) and interest in and satisfaction with a supportive website on genetics among GPs. Three oncogenetics modules were developed: an online Continuing Professional Development (G-eCPD) module, a live genetic CPD module, and a "GP and genetics" website (huisartsengenetica.nl) providing further genetics information applicable in daily practice. Three assessments to evaluate the effectiveness (1-year follow-up) of the oncogenetic modules were designed: 1.An online questionnaire on self-reported genetic competencies and changes in referral behaviour, 2.Referral rates from GPs to clinical genetics centres and 3.Satisfaction questionnaire and visitor count analytics of supportive genetics website. The setting was Primary care in the Netherlands and three groups of study participants were included in the reported studies:. Assessment 1. 168 GPs responded to an email invitation and were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group, evaluating the G-eCPD module (n = 80) or the live module (n = 88). Assessment 2. Referral rates by GPs were requested from the clinical genetics centres, in the northern and southern parts of the Netherlands (Amsterdam and Maastricht), for the two years before (2010 [n = 2510] and 2011 [n = 2940]) and the year after (2012 [n = 2875]) launch of the oncogenetics CPD modules and the website. Assessment 3. Participants of the website evaluation were all recruited online. When they visited the website during the month of February 2013, a pop-up invitation came up. Of the 1350 unique visitors that month, only 38 completed the online questionnaire. Main outcomes measure showed long-term (self-reported) genetic consultation skills (i.e. increased genetics awareness and referrals to clinical genetics centres) among GPs who participated in the oncogenetic training course, and interest in and satisfaction with the supportive website. 42 GPs (52%) who previously participated in the G-eCPD evaluation study and 50 GPs (57%) who participated in the live training programme responded to the online questionnaire on long-term effects of educational outcome. Previous RCTs showed that the genetics CPD modules achieved sustained improvement of oncogenetic knowledge and consultation skills (3-months follow-up). Participants of these RCTs reported being more aware of genetic problems long term; this was reported by 29 GPs (69%) and 46 GPs (92%) participating in the G-eCPD and live module evaluation studies, respectively (Chisquare test, p<0.005). One year later, 68% of the respondents attending the live training reported that they more frequently referred patients to the clinical genetics centres, compared to 29% of those who attended the online oncogenetics training (Chisquare test, p<0.0005). However, the clinical genetics centres reported no significant change in referral numbers one year after the training. Website visitor numbers increased, as did satisfaction, reflected in a 7.7 and 8.1 (out of 10) global rating of the website (by G-eCPD and live module participants, respectively). The page most often consulted was "family tree drawing". Self-perceived genetic consultation skills increased long-term and GPs were interested in and satisfied with the supportive website. Further studies are necessary to see whether the oncogenetics CPD modules result in more efficient referral. The results presented suggest we have provided a flexible and effective framework to meet the need for effective educational programmes for non-geneticist healthcare providers, enabling improvement of genetic medical care.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0122648PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383330PMC
March 2016

De novo mutations in the motor domain of KIF1A cause cognitive impairment, spastic paraparesis, axonal neuropathy, and cerebellar atrophy.

Hum Mutat 2015 Jan 27;36(1):69-78. Epub 2014 Nov 27.

Biomedical Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, Korea.

KIF1A is a neuron-specific motor protein that plays important roles in cargo transport along neurites. Recessive mutations in KIF1A were previously described in families with spastic paraparesis or sensory and autonomic neuropathy type-2. Here, we report 11 heterozygous de novo missense mutations (p.S58L, p.T99M, p.G102D, p.V144F, p.R167C, p.A202P, p.S215R, p.R216P, p.L249Q, p.E253K, and p.R316W) in KIF1A in 14 individuals, including two monozygotic twins. Two mutations (p.T99M and p.E253K) were recurrent, each being found in unrelated cases. All these de novo mutations are located in the motor domain (MD) of KIF1A. Structural modeling revealed that they alter conserved residues that are critical for the structure and function of the MD. Transfection studies suggested that at least five of these mutations affect the transport of the MD along axons. Individuals with de novo mutations in KIF1A display a phenotype characterized by cognitive impairment and variable presence of cerebellar atrophy, spastic paraparesis, optic nerve atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and epilepsy. Our findings thus indicate that de novo missense mutations in the MD of KIF1A cause a phenotype that overlaps with, while being more severe, than that associated with recessive mutations in the same gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.22709DOI Listing
January 2015