Publications by authors named "Connie Choua"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Delivered with Motor Training Enhances Recovery of Function after Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Neurotrauma 2016 05 5;33(9):871-9. Epub 2015 Aug 5.

1 The, School of Behavioral Brain Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas , Richardson, Texas.

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is one of the largest health problems in the United States, and affects nearly 2 million people every year. The effects of TBI, including weakness and loss of coordination, can be debilitating and last years after the initial injury. Recovery of motor function is often incomplete. We have developed a method using electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve paired with forelimb use by which we have demonstrated enhanced recovery from ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Here we have tested the hypothesis that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) paired with physical rehabilitation could enhance functional recovery after TBI. We trained rats to pull on a handle to receive a food reward. Following training, they received a controlled-cortical impact (CCI) in the forelimb area of motor cortex opposite the trained forelimb, and were then randomized into two treatment groups. One group of animals received VNS paired with rehabilitative therapy, whereas another group received rehabilitative therapy without VNS. Following CCI, volitional forelimb strength and task success rate in all animals were significantly reduced. VNS paired with rehabilitative therapy over a period of 5 weeks significantly increased recovery of both forelimb strength and success rate on the isometric pull task compared with rehabilitative training without VNS. No significant improvement was observed in the Rehab group. Our findings indicate that VNS paired with rehabilitative therapy enhances functional motor recovery after TBI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/neu.2015.3972DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860663PMC
May 2016

Controlled-cortical impact reduces volitional forelimb strength in rats.

Brain Res 2014 Sep 1;1582:91-8. Epub 2014 Aug 1.

The University of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States; The University of Texas at Dallas, Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States; The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas Biomedical Device Center, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021, United States.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the largest health problems in the United States and affects both cognitive and motor function. Although weakness is common in TBI patients, few studies have demonstrated a reduction in strength in models of brain injury. We have developed a behavioral method to measure volitional forelimb strength and quantify forelimb weakness following traumatic brain injury. In this paper, we report the ability of the isometric pull task to measure both acute and chronic impairments in forelimb motor function following a controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rodents. Following CCI, volitional forelimb strength is reduced by 36% and remains significantly reduced after 6 weeks of post-lesion training. We also show that CCI results in impairment of multiple additional measures of forelimb function for several weeks post-injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2014.07.039DOI Listing
September 2014