Publications by authors named "Congcong Fan"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of the Cholesterol-Lowering Mechanism of Strain 132 and Strain 201 in Hypercholesterolemia Rats.

Nutrients 2021 Jun 9;13(6). Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Safety and Health, State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Institute of Microbiology, Guangdong Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510070, China.

Hypercholesterolemia can cause many diseases, but it can effectively regulated by . This study aimed to evaluate the cholesterol-lowering mechanism of strain 132 and strain 201. These results showed that both the strains decreased serum total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), liver TC and TG and increased fecal TC, TG and total bile acid (TBA) levels. Additionally, both strains also reduced glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (AST) and levels of tissue inflammation levels to improve the lipid profile, and they reduced fat accumulation partially by alleviating inflammatory responses. Furthermore, both strains regulated the expression of the , , and gene to promote cholesterol metabolism and reduce TG accumulation. Interventions with both strains also altered the gut microbiota, and decreasing the abundance of Veillonellaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae and . Furthermore, fecal acetic acid and propionic acid were increased by this intervention. Overall, the results suggested that strain 132 and strain 201 can alleviate hypercholesterolemia in rats and might be applied as a new type of hypercholesterolemia agent in functional foods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13061982DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8228983PMC
June 2021

Characterization and Genomic Analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Bacteriophage FEC14, a New Member of Genus Kuttervirus.

Curr Microbiol 2021 Jan 13;78(1):159-166. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

Department of Pathogenobiology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, People's Republic of China.

Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important foodborne pathogen that has become a major worldwide factor affecting the public safety of food. Bacteriophage has gradually attracted attention because of its ability to kill specific pathogens. In this study, a lytic phage of E. coli O157:H7, named FEC14, was isolated from hospital sewage. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that phage FEC14 had an isometric head 80 ± 5 nm in diameter and a contractile tail whose terminal spikes present an umbrella-like structure. Phage FEC14 revealed 158,639 bp double-stranded DNA, with the G+C content of 44.6%, 209 ORFs and four tRNAs. Genome DNA of FEC14 could not be digested by some endonucleases. Many of the features of phage FEC14 are very similar to those of the newly classified genus "Kuttervirus", including morphology, genome size and organization, etc. Phage FEC14 is proposed to be a new isolate of genus "Kuttervirus" within the family Ackermannviridae, moreover, the endonuclease resistance of phage FEC14, has priority over other genera of bacteriophages for its use in biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-020-02283-xDOI Listing
January 2021

Probiotics supplementation improves hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus: An update of meta-analysis.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2021 21;61(10):1670-1688. Epub 2020 May 21.

School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Xi an, China.

Although many studies have shown that consumption of probiotics is relevant to diabetes, the effects of probiotics improves clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes have yielded conflicting results. The aim of this meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effects of probiotics supplementation on glycemic, blood lipids, pressure and inflammatory control in type 2 diabetes. PubMed, Web of science, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for relevant studies from February 2015 up to Janurary 2020, with no language restrictions. The pooled results were calculated with the use of a random-effects model to assess the impact of supplemental probiotics on glycemic, blood lipids, pressure and inflammatory control in type 2 diabetes. Additionally, subgroup analysis was conducted based on patients age, body mass index (BMI), country and duration of the probiotics supplement, respectively. 13 studies were included in this meta-analysis, involving a total of 818 participants in 8 countries. Overall, compared with control groups, the subjects who received multiple species of probiotics had a statistically significant reduction in fasting blood sugar (FBS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α [standardized mean difference (SMD): -0.89 mg/Dl, 95% CI: -1.66, -0.12 mg/dL; SMD: -0.43, 95% CI: -0.63, -0.23; SMD: -0.19 mg/dL, 95% CI: -0.36, -0.01 mg/dL; SMD: -0.23 mg/dL, 95% CI: -0.40, -0.05 mg/dL; SMD: -5.61 mmHg, 95% CI: -9.78, -1.45 mmHg; SMD: -3.41 mmHg, 95% CI: -6.12, -0.69 mmHg; and SMD: 6.92 pg/ml, 95% CI: 5.95, 7.89 pg/ml, respectively]. However, the subjects who received single-species of probiotic or probiotic with co-supplements in food only changed FBS, HOMA-IR, DBP and TG levels. Moreover, subgroup analyses revealed that the effects of probiotics supplementation on FBS, HMOA-IR, SBP and DBP are significantly influenced by patients age, body mass index (BMI), country and duration of the probiotics supplement. Our analysis revealed that glycemic, lipids, blood pressure and inflammation indicators are significantly improved by probiotic supplementation, particularly the subjects who ages ≤ 55, baseline BMI< 30 kg/m, duration of intervention more than 8 weeks, and received multiple species probiotic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2020.1764488DOI Listing
April 2021

CD74 knockout protects against LPS-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction through AMPK-Skp2-SUV39H1-mediated demethylation of BCLB.

Br J Pharmacol 2020 04 11;177(8):1881-1897. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Department of Cardiology and Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fudan University Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Background And Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria, triggers myocardial anomalies in sepsis. Recent findings indicated a role for inflammatory cytokine MIF and its receptor, CD74, in septic organ injury, although little is known of the role of MIF-CD74 in septic cardiomyopathy.

Experimental Approach: This study evaluated the impact of CD74 ablation on endotoxaemia-induced cardiac anomalies. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca properties were examined.

Key Results: Our data revealed compromised cardiac function (lower fractional shortening, enlarged LV end systolic diameter, decreased peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, prolonged duration of relengthening and intracellular Ca mishandling) and ultrastructural derangement associated with inflammation, O production, apoptosis, excess autophagy, phosphorylation of AMPK and JNK and dampened mTOR phosphorylation. These effects were attenuated or mitigated by CD74 knockout. LPS challenge also down-regulated Skp2, an F-box component of Skp1/Cullin/F-box protein-type ubiquitin ligase, while up-regulating that of SUV39H1 and H3K9 methylation of the Bcl2 protein BCLB. These effects were reversed by CD74 ablation. In vitro study revealed that LPS facilitated GFP-LC3B formation and cardiomyocyte defects. These effects were prevented by CD74 ablation. Interestingly, the AMPK activator AICAR, the autophagy inducer rapamycin and the demethylation inhibitor difenoconazole inhibited the effects of CD74 ablation against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction, while the SUV39H1 inhibitor chaetocin or methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC ameliorated LPS-induced GFP-LC3B formation and cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction.

Conclusion And Implications: Our data suggested that CD74 ablation protected against LPS-induced cardiac anomalies, O production, inflammation and apoptosis through suppression of autophagy in a Skp2-SUV39H1-mediated mechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.14959DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7070165PMC
April 2020

Defects controlled hole doping and multivalley transport in SnSe single crystals.

Nat Commun 2018 01 3;9(1):47. Epub 2018 Jan 3.

Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.

SnSe is a promising thermoelectric material with record-breaking figure of merit. However, to date a comprehensive understanding of the electronic structure and most critically, the self-hole-doping mechanism in SnSe is still absent. Here we report the highly anisotropic electronic structure of SnSe investigated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, in which a unique pudding-mould-shaped valence band with quasi-linear energy dispersion is revealed. We prove that p-type doping in SnSe is extrinsically controlled by local phase segregation of SnSe microdomains via interfacial charge transferring. The multivalley nature of the pudding-mould band is manifested in quantum transport by crystallographic axis-dependent weak localisation and exotic non-saturating negative magnetoresistance. Strikingly, quantum oscillations also reveal 3D Fermi surface with unusual interlayer coupling strength in p-SnSe, in which individual monolayers are interwoven by peculiar point dislocation defects. Our results suggest that defect engineering may provide versatile routes in improving the thermoelectric performance of the SnSe family.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-02566-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5752673PMC
January 2018
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