Publications by authors named "Collin K Chin"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ibrutinib for central nervous system lymphoma: the Australasian Lymphoma Alliance/MD Anderson Cancer Center experience.

Br J Haematol 2021 Mar 16;192(6):1049-1053. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Department of Haematology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.

Primary and secondary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL/SCNSL) are aggressive rare malignancies with dismal outcomes. Encouraging data have emerged from Phase I/II clinical trials treating relapsed/refractory PCNSL/SCNSL with ibrutinib. We analysed 33 patients who received ibrutinib, alone or with other therapies, for PCNSL (n = 9) or SCNSL (n = 24). The objective response rate was 58% (complete response 55%). The median progression-free survival and overall survival for patients with PCNSL were both 3·1 months; for SCNSL, 10·2 and 11·5 months respectively. Only one invasive fungal infection was observed, despite concurrent or recent use of dexamethasone 8-16 mg daily in 14 patients (42%). Ibrutinib has encouraging activity in these aggressive malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.16946DOI Listing
March 2021

Novel Agents Beyond Immunomodulatory Agents and Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase for Follicular Lymphoma.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2020 08 5;34(4):743-756. Epub 2020 May 5.

Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 0429, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Follicular lymphoma is the most common indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Although median overall survival rates exceed 12 years with rituximab, follicular lymphoma remains largely incurable. The growing understanding of the molecular drivers of lymphomagenesis and the tumor microenvironment have led to novel therapies. Prognostic markers have identified a subset of patients with chemoresistant and/or refractory disease-associated poor outcomes. We identify the patients with follicular lymphoma in need of novel therapies, describe the drivers of lymphomagenesis and importance of the tumor microenvironment, and summarize the novel agents under investigation in relapsed/refractory and upfront follicular lymphoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2020.03.002DOI Listing
August 2020

Secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis due to checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

Eur J Cancer 2019 Jul 23;115:84-87. Epub 2019 May 23.

Department of Haematology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and Pathwest Laboratory Medicine, Perth, WA, Australia; School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2019.04.026DOI Listing
July 2019

The Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Utility of Molecular Testing in a Patient with Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia.

Int J Mol Sci 2017 Sep 22;18(10). Epub 2017 Sep 22.

Department of Haematology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and Pathwest Laboratory Medicine WA, Nedlands 6009, Australia.

The application of molecular genomics and our understanding of its clinical implications in the diagnosis, prognostication and treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders has rapidly evolved over the past few years. Of particular importance are indolent B-cell malignancies where tumour cell survival and proliferation are commonly driven by mutations involving the B-cell receptor and downstream signalling pathways. In addition, the increasing number of novel therapies and targeted agents have provided clinicians with new therapeutic options with the aim of exploiting such mutations. In this case report, we highlight one such success story involving the diagnostic impact of the mutation in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), its prognostic implications and effect on choice of therapy in the era of novel therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms18102038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5666720PMC
September 2017

How I treat patients with aggressive lymphoma at high risk of CNS relapse.

Blood 2017 08 13;130(7):867-874. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

Department of Haematology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.

Central nervous system (CNS) relapses are an uncommon yet devastating complication of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The identification of patients at high risk of secondary CNS relapse is therefore paramount. Retrospective data indicate prophylactic CNS-directed therapies may reduce the risk of CNS involvement; however, no consensus exists about dose, timing, or route of therapy. In addition, prophylaxis is not without risk of treatment-related complications and morbidity. Here, we present a series of case vignettes highlighting our approach to common dilemmas encountered in routine clinical practice. We review the method of assessing CNS relapse risk, factors that increase the likelihood of relapse including histologic subtype, rearrangement, protein expression, and extranodal involvement, and review our clinical practice based on available evidence in administering CNS-directed prophylaxis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2017-03-737460DOI Listing
August 2017

Does the Aged Care Funding Instrument provide increased funding in residential care? Comparisons with the Residential Classification Scale.

Australas J Ageing 2014 Jun 15;33(2):121-3. Epub 2013 May 15.

School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; Department of Geriatrics, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia.

Aim: To determine whether the Aged Care Funding Instrument (ACFI) provides more funding than the Residential Classification Scale (RCS) for residents in the Hellenic Residential Care Facility.

Methods: All residents within the care facility were assessed over a six 6-month period using ACFI, RCS and Clifton Assessment Procedures for the Elderly (CAPE) scores. Differences in funding levels were calculated using ACFI and RCS instruments against a standardised CAPE score.

Results: CAPE dependency RCS funding per resident per day varied from $32.20 for grade A to $116.20 for grade E4 residents. CAPE ACFI funding varied from $20.20 for grade A to $127.50 for grade E4. There was no significant difference in mean overall funding between the two scales (ACFI $92.50 vs RCS $90.35, P = 0.76).

Conclusions: The ACFI does provide a small but not significant increase in funding to residents in residential care. It redirects funding to higher dependency residents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajag.12036DOI Listing
June 2014