Publications by authors named "Colin Goodman"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prevalence, clinical correlates and risk factors associated with Tardive Dyskinesia in Chinese patients with schizophrenia.

Asian J Psychiatr 2021 Oct 2;66:102877. Epub 2021 Oct 2.

CAS Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Tardive Dyskinesia (TD) is a serious, nonrhythmic and iatrogenic movement disorder, and is a common comorbidity in patients with schizophrenia (SZ). The main goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence, clinical correlates, and risk factors of TD in Chinese patients with chronic SZ, which has not been fully studied. This study adopted a cross-sectional design. A total of 901 Chinese inpatients with SZ were recruited between 2008 and 2011. We used the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) to measure the severity of TD, and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used to measure the psychopathological symptoms of SZ. Blood samples were also collected for routine blood tests, including the levels of triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHO), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-CHO), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-CHO), Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), and Apolipoprotein B (ApoB). Overall, 36% of patients with SZ had TD. Compared with the non-TD patients, the TD patients were more likely to be men, had older age, lower education level, higher smoking rate, higher hospitalization frequency, and longer duration of illness (DOI). Further, compared with the non-TD patients, the TD patients had higher PANSS total, PANSS negative subscale, and cognitive subscale scores, but had lower depressive subscale scores and lower mean levels of metabolic biomarkers, including TG, CHO, HDL-CHO, LDL-CHO, ApoA1 and ApoB. Moreover, binary regression analysis showed that antipsychotic type, BMI, gender, age, HDL-CHO, and ApoB were associated with TD. Our findings indicate that TD is a common movement disorder in patients with chronic SZ, with certain demographic and clinical variables being risk factors for the development of TD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2021.102877DOI Listing
October 2021

Factors of Negative Affect in Elderly Patients With Substance Use Disorders During COVID-19 Pandemic.

Front Psychiatry 2021 20;12:697472. Epub 2021 Jul 20.

CAS Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become the greatest public health emergency and has attracted global attention. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the negative affect (NA) of elderly patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) has also become a more serious public concern. The current study aims to clarify the NA and its influencing factors in elderly patients with SUDs during the pandemic. Two psychiatrists conducted semi-structured interviews with 77 SUD patients aged above 50 years to collect their demographical information and certain drug use characteristics. Barratt Impulse Scale and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale were used to obtain information about patients' self-reported impulsivity and NA. Univariate linear regression analysis showed that NA was positively correlated with the frequency of drug use, type of SUDs, cravings during COVID-19, and impulsivity. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that being female, higher frequency of drug use, stronger cravings, and greater impulsiveness jointly accounted for the variation of NA in elderly patients with SUDs. This study confirmed that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, gender, frequency of drug use, cravings, and impulsivity were associated with NA in elderly patients with SUDs. This study provided a theoretical basis for clinicians to reduce the patients' NA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.697472DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8329338PMC
July 2021

Do free-ranging rattlesnakes use thermal cues to evaluate prey?

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol 2018 03 7;204(3):295-303. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

Department of Biology, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA, 92182, USA.

Rattlesnakes use infrared radiation to detect prey animals such as small mammals and lizards. Because ectotherm locomotor performance depends on temperature, rattlesnakes could use prey temperature to evaluate the potential of lizards to evade attacks. Here, we tested whether hunting rattlesnakes use infrared information to (1) detect and (2) evaluate prey before attack. We expected thermal contrast between prey and background to be the best predictor of predatory behaviour under the prey detection hypothesis, and absolute prey temperature under the prey evaluation hypothesis. We presented lizard carcasses of varying temperatures to free-ranging sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes) and scored behavioural responses as a function of thermal contrast, absolute lizard temperature, and light level. Thermal contrast and light level were the most salient predictors of snake behaviour. Snakes were more likely to respond to lizards and/or respond at greater distances at night and when thermal contrast was high, supporting the known prey detection function of infrared sensing. Absolute lizard temperature was not an important predictor of snake behaviour; thus, we found no evidence for temperature-based prey evaluation. Infrared sensing is still poorly understood in ecologically relevant contexts; future research will test whether rattlesnakes learn to evaluate prey based on temperature with experience.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00359-017-1239-8DOI Listing
March 2018

Patient Knowledge and Attitudes About Fecal Microbiota Therapy for Infection.

Fed Pract 2017 Jan;34(1):15-19

is a pharmacist at the Mayo Clinic Hospital Rochester. is a medical researcher, and is a staff physician, infectious diseases, at the Minneapolis VA Health Care System, all in Minnesota. is a first-year resident in internal medicine at the University of Illinois in Chicago. Dr. Drekonja is an associate professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis.

In a survey of patients with infection, physician recommendation seemed to be the largest factor affecting the likelihood of patients considering future fecal microbial therapy.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372037PMC
January 2017
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